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Re: question on name composition, 'de'

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  • sismith42 <sismith42@yahoo.com>
    ... I forwarded this to my freindly, neighborhood herald (who also doubles as a boyfreind), since this is his area of specialty (he taught a class on
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 3, 2003
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      > Would the name have been converted to "du" for "of the
      > {feminine noun}" in 13th-14th century France?

      I forwarded this to my freindly, neighborhood herald (who also
      doubles as a boyfreind), since this is his area of specialty (he
      taught a class on pronouncing middle French at University, besides
      being from France):

      Steph, forward this to the appropriate list :)

      This is an answer from the top of my head without a middle French
      grammar at hand:

      The way I see it, 'du chardon' means 'of the thistle' as in
      'originating from the particular plant', which honestly strikes me as
      odd for a
      period name. 'des' or 'du' really means that something is 'from'
      somewhere. As an alternative 'des chardons' would work better because
      it could
      relate to an activity closely related to thistles like a florist
      specialised in cultivating thistles (still odd in its own way since
      thistles
      as a weed). Finally 'de Chardon' would work if there is documentation
      that there is a period place name called 'Chardon'. There is none
      that I
      can personally think of but I don't know the name of every tiny
      village
      in France.
      The bottom line is 'du chardon' although grammatically correct
      strikes
      me as very queer for a period French name.

      Hope this helps

      -Ulf
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