Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Where to start?

Expand Messages
  • alizkye
    Hello to all. I m new to the list, though not new to the SCA. For a while now I ve been wanting to improve my authenticity in the Society and really focus on
    Message 1 of 50 , Nov 20, 2002
      Hello to all. I'm new to the list, though not new to the SCA. For a
      while now I've been wanting to improve my authenticity in the Society
      and really focus on one time and place of history. However I have a
      horrible tendency to run off in all directions at once and
      consequently not accomplish anything at all (though I have dozens of
      barely started projects :)

      I'd love to hear everyone's thoughts on what they feel is a good
      starting point in being more authentic? I've asked this question of
      some local to me and have gotten some interesting answers but I
      thought it might be a good topic, especially for those of us just
      starting this journey.

      aliskye
      Barony of Lyondemere, Caid
    • xina007eu
      ... such ... as ... different ... inventory ... I meant that the 20th century people who started using the word as a noun did this because they did not realise
      Message 50 of 50 , Nov 27, 2002
        --- In Authentic_SCA@y..., "Amy L. Hornburg Heilveil" <aheilvei@u...>
        wrote:
        > *Snipped large and useful OED definition of "treen"*
        >
        > >Thanks for posting this, however I'm not convinced that this was
        such
        > >a popular word once that one has to use it today. I'll stick
        > >with "wooden". Seeing the word as a noun seems to me a
        > >misinterpretation of earlier occurrences that occurred precisely
        > >because the adjective wasn't in use any more and wasn't understood
        as
        > >such and maybe confused with the plural "treen".
        >
        > Personally, eight quotes from in period grouped in two or three
        different
        > eras is good enough for me. You don't use words in a will or an
        inventory
        > that would/could be misinterpreted for the most part.
        >
        > Smiles,
        > Despina de la has treen plates *grin*

        I meant that the 20th century people who started using the word as a
        noun did this because they did not realise it was supposed to be an
        adjective. And they did not realise this because at the time they
        wrote the word had been out of use for quite a while. They saw "a
        treen dish" as an analogous construction to "a pottery dish", which
        is incorrect. (Of course "treen" does not mean the same as "pottery",
        it's the construction I'm after, OK?)
        Summary:
        Treen (adj.) -> period (possibly regional and maybe obsolescent later
        on - if Spenser uses it I am always suspicious because he uses a lot
        of old-fashioned words)
        Treen (singular noun) -> NOT period. First written occurrence in OED
        may be the 1927 quote, but this is open to interpretation because it
        quotes the word and the author may have realised it was an adjective.

        When you look at OED quotes, please bear in mind that Middle English
        is not the same as Modern English and that a word that Chaucer used
        may well have been obsolete in Shakespeare's time. Lots of words,
        especially words with Germanic roots, that were used in Middle
        English times, did not make it into Modern English. Middle English
        very roughly goes up to 1500 (that's very roughly, no arguing about a
        few decades please, this is just an easy date for non-linguists to
        remember).
        Best regards,

        Christina
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.