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Plain smocks Was:Re: How early were chemises embroidered?

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  • Anneke Lyffland
    ... ... These references are mostly Flemish painters, there are some from German and a French painters for comparison. Most of the painings are on Web
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 10, 2002
      --- In Authentic_SCA@y..., "Generys ferch Ednuyed" wrote:
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: "Anneke Lyffland"
      > To:
      > Sent: Tuesday, October 08, 2002 4:38 PM
      > Subject: [Authentic_SCA] Re: How early were chemises embroidered?
      <snip>
      > > The smock neckline is usually plain when visible. :) I've found two
      > smock-like garments that are decoreted, but they are worn by religious
      > persons.
      >
      > So in which paintings is it visible and plain? (I'm curious, the two you
      > mentioned below with the decorated parts are the only two I've found at
      > all...
      >
      > Generys

      These references are mostly Flemish painters, there are some from German and a French painters for comparison. Most of the painings are on Web Gallery of Art, but some references come from books. I haven't had time to look at illuminations, but there's a picture in Files section:
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Authentic_SCA/files/1470%27s%20Dancing%20Peasants.jpg

      Rogier van der Weyden:
      Abegg Triptych, c. 1445
      Seven Sacraments, c. 1445-1450
      St. columba Altarpiece, c. 1455
      Madonna, c. 1460
      St. John Altarpiece, c. 1455-1460
      Lamentation, c. 1460-1480

      Master of Legend of St. Catherine:
      Deposition, c. 1470-1480

      Petrus Christus:
      Naitivity, c. 1452

      Hans Memling:
      Naitivity, c. 1470-1472
      Bathseba, 1485
      Passion, 1491

      Master of the Life of Virgin:
      The Birth of Mary, c. 1470

      Michael Pacher:
      The Birth of Mary, 15th century

      Simon Marmion:
      Scenes from the Life of St. Bertin, 1459

      Master of Pullendorf Altar:
      The Birth of Mary, early 15th century

      Unknown:
      Deposition, 1470's
      Naitivity, last quarter of 15th century

      I also found an embroidered smock:

      Triptych by Hans Memling, ca. 1470: http://www.kfki.hu/~arthp/art/m/memling/1early2/04notri1.jpg

      Another smock lookalike Mary is wearing on the left panel. The quality of this scan isn't very good, but in a book I have the neckline is clearly embroidered.


      Anneke

      -~*~-
      Life's a journey - not a destination. Amazing, Aerosmith
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