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Re: [Authentic_SCA] Fw: Blackwork

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  • Kirrily Robert
    ... Someone else has already mentioned the Bostoke sampler. I ll turn your question around a bit, and instead of answering what you asked, I ll answer Was
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 31, 2002
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      Apollonia asked:
      > When doing black work, from about 1550-1600, did people make samplers? Or
      > pictures? Or just embellish clothing?

      Someone else has already mentioned the Bostoke sampler. I'll turn your
      question around a bit, and instead of answering what you asked, I'll
      answer "Was blackwork used on anything other than clothing?"

      The answer is a resounding "yes". There are numerous examples of
      household textiles decorated with blackwork. These include cushion
      covers, bedspreads, etc. Some of the best examples you'll find are in
      Mary Gostelow's "Blackwork" which is published by Dover and hence is
      cheaply and readily available.

      Many of the cushions and covers I've seen done in blackwork have both
      representational designs (birds, foliage, flowers, etc) outlined in chain
      stitch or similar, and a range of filling stitches used for shading or
      just variety. One example I've seen has a grid pattern of diamonds, and
      in each diamond is a different type of bird, including things like
      cranes and turkeys. Another has a border with a scrolling foliage
      pattern, and the centre is filled with leaves that look like ivy or
      something, and each leaf is filled with a different blackwork filling
      stitch.

      So in one way they are "samplers" because they demonstrate a range of
      simple stitches. And in a way they are "pictures" because they have
      designs that are immediately recognisable as actual things, not just
      geometric designs.

      Hope that helps.

      Yours,

      Katherine

      --
      Lady Katherine Rowberd (mka Kirrily "Skud" Robert)
      katherine@... http://infotrope.net/sca/
      Caldrithig, Skraeling Althing, Ealdormere
      "The rose is red, the leaves are grene, God save Elizabeth our Queene"
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