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Re: [Authentic_SCA] Origami question

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  • Moreta
    Origami as we know it is not period. However, like many things, it s origins and original form(s) are period. Keep in mind that the links/sources I found are
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 30, 2002
      Origami as we know it is not period.  However, like many things, it's origins and original form(s) are period.
       
      Keep in mind that the links/sources I found are not proven accurate, but are good for finding basic ideas and vocabulary
      to provide a starting point for further research.  I love Google!  (and researching, of course).  Also while browsing, I noted
      that there are a lot of mailing lists and societies for origami - perhaps some of their members can point your friend towards
      actual books and articles, instead of summaries.
       
      I hope this helps you and your friend out, at least in some small way.
       
      - Elinor
       

       
      Items wrapped in paper starting around the Heian (794-1192) period, Tatogami is an example
      During Muromachi (1392-1573) period, paper became more common, the folded wrapping became an art for the samurai
      * Pajarita (little bird) is a Spanish folding paper tradition, thought to have been brought by the Moors in 8th century
       
      Probably originated in China around 1st or 2nd century AD, arrived in Japan in Heian period
      Only nobility practiced paper folding until post-period (middle of the Edo period)
       
      Actual name of origami dates from 18th century
      Folding paper is mentioned in medieval Japanese literature
       
      First mentioned in literature in the 4th century
      Origami was used in worship (represented spirit of God, hung in shrines and worshipped) - kami = both god & paper in Japanese
      Medieval origami involved cutting as well as folding
       
      In Heian Era, paper folding known as futokogami, kashi, or tatogami
      Spain's pajarita dates to 16th century, not inspired by Japan
       
      [collection of email postings, post near end quotes from "Another View of the Word Origami" by Maseo Okamura]
       
      On page 530 he writes:
      "During the Heian period, a gentlemen carried in his pocket several pieces of paper folded in two vertically
      and then folded in four horizontally. The way of folding paper, however, varied from one period to another.
      They also used pieces of thicker paper (called "danshi") scattered with gold and silver flake and folded in two
      to hold thinner paper inside. They always carried such pieces of paper mainly to blow their noses and to write
      down a poem or brief letter. There were also wrappers made of beautiful paper, which were designed to wrap
      women's cosmetics."  [Mr. Okamura adds in a footnote here:"In the picture of 'Tatogami Shop' shown in
      'Shichijuchiban Shokunin Uta Awase' (1500), one can see  wrapper made of two or three pieces of paper
      piled and folded up in the way that two corners of each paper show in the front. The wrapper looks quite similar
      to incense wrappers of later times. The text says that the wrapper is finished luxuriously with gold and silver
      flakes scattered on it. The picture is the earliest visual source of origami."
       
      Article by David Lister, an origami historian/researcher/scholar
      No evidence of recreational folding until around 1600
      No evidence paper folding definately came from East
      European table napkin folding dates from 16th-17th century
      Windmill folding pattern used for astrological diagrams & baptismal certificates in Spain in 12th century
      1490 - Venetian book "Tractatus de Spaera Mundi" by Johannes de Sacrobusto may show paper boats
      1614 - English play "The Duchess of Malfi" by John Webster, refers to paper boxes used to catch flies
      European paperfolding either used waterbomb or windmill base, no indication of bird or frog bases
       
      Also by Lister
      Thoroughly researched article on pajarita's origins - this author has found no primary sources pre-1600 for pajarita
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Sunday, June 30, 2002 7:01 PM
      Subject: [Authentic_SCA] Origami question

      Hey all,
       
      A friend in my canton has taken up origami, and the earliest source he can find is one from 1797, which, as he knows, is post period.  So do any of you have any sources that are in period? 
       
      Thanks,
       
      Apollonia
    • Amy L. Hornburg Heilveil
      ... Your best bet on this one, I would think, would be Effingham... if you can pry him away from his studies. Smiles, Despina
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 1, 2002
        At 01:46 AM 7/1/2002 -0500, you wrote:
        >Origami as we know it is not period. However, like many things, it's
        >origins and original form(s) are period.

        Your best bet on this one, I would think, would be Effingham... if you can
        pry him away from his studies.

        Smiles,
        Despina
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