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Re: freezing, pre-cooking and other horrible deeds ;)

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  • wodeford
    ... the best. And ... used. Not that my recipes have been period (yet), but I ve found that pre- cooked stews do fine in the ice chest for 24-48 hours. In the
    Message 1 of 8 , Jun 28, 2002
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      --- In Authentic_SCA@y..., rose@s... wrote:
      > Hello Marianne!
      >
      > I find that soups and stews survive the "freeze and reheat" cycle
      the best. And
      > the frozen bags keep the ice chest nice and cool until they're
      used.

      Not that my recipes have been period (yet), but I've found that pre-
      cooked stews do fine in the ice chest for 24-48 hours. In the
      interest of labor saving and reducing food poisoning, I've been pre-
      cooking and refrigerating things for weekend campouts: bacon (to be
      scrambled into our breakfast eggs), boeuf bourgignonne and chicken
      stewed in beer have all reheated nicely after storage in our cooler.
      Precooking the bacon also means I can dispose of the attendant grease
      in my own kitchen!

      The chicken stew was my own invention: white meat chicken, chicken
      broth, one bottle of beer (Henry Weinhardt's amber), mushrooms,
      onions and carrots, a little flour to thicken the broth. Served it
      in bread bowls. Good stuff.

      Jehanne
    • Cannoneer
      ... That s what the campfire s for :) BTW we ve found that a 50/50 mix of bacon fat and candlewax makes a GREAT firestarter for wet wood (or Greek Fire,
      Message 2 of 8 , Jun 30, 2002
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        At 09:39 PM 06/28/2002 +0000, you wrote:
        >Precooking the bacon also means I can dispose of the attendant grease
        >in my own kitchen!
        >
        >Jehanne

        That's what the campfire's for :)

        BTW we've found that a 50/50 mix of bacon fat and candlewax makes a
        GREAT firestarter for wet wood (or Greek Fire, whatever your needs are!)


        Roderic Hawkyns
        Master Gunner

        Artillery lends dignity to what might otherwise be a vulgar brawl
      • wodeford
        ... Assuming you live in a kingdom where ground fires are permitted, Master Gunner. I currently cook on an evil propane stove, though Gaius and I will probably
        Message 3 of 8 , Jun 30, 2002
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          --- In Authentic_SCA@y..., Cannoneer <cannoneer@s...> wrote:
          > That's what the campfire's for :)
          Assuming you live in a kingdom where ground fires are permitted,
          Master Gunner. I currently cook on an evil propane stove, though
          Gaius and I will probably acquire a "portable firepit" one of these
          days. (Imagine a large "bowl" constructed of articulated metal plates
          suspended from a tripod).

          > BTW we've found that a 50/50 mix of bacon fat and candlewax makes a
          > GREAT firestarter for wet wood (or Greek Fire, whatever your needs
          are!)

          I'll keep that in mind next time I have to shoot flaming arrows at
          someone.

          Jehanne
          (Bemused at the proliferation of legal fireworks shops in a state
          where brush fires are a common hazard.)
        • Marianne Perdomo Machin
          Greetings! Thanks for the suggestions! I think I ll go for the experimental approach. Make small batches, freeze for a week, then try it and see what works,
          Message 4 of 8 , Jul 1, 2002
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            Greetings!

            Thanks for the suggestions! I think I'll go for the experimental approach. Make
            small batches, freeze for a week, then try it and see what works, starting with the
            almond milk. (I might seem obsessed with that, but there's this lovely chicken in
            lemon, ginger and almond-milk sauce I want to make).

            As for the non-cooler texts I re-read them just in case but a lot of it seems to
            deal with keeping the food, not pre-doing the work. Still, we will be doing some
            bread, cheese, cured meats, olives, that sort of thing as a complement (a van sells
            bread on site early-ish in the mornings). Hopefully I'll do the non-cooler thing
            sometime, but I think this occasion is not the best for it.

            Thanks!


            Marianne
          • Cannoneer
            ... Actually, that s how we discovered this little gem. We were using a portable firepit with an attached tripod and trying to get it going so we could have
            Message 5 of 8 , Jul 1, 2002
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              At 03:35 AM 07/01/2002 +0000, you wrote:
              >Gaius and I will probably acquire a "portable firepit" one of these
              >days. (Imagine a large "bowl" constructed of articulated metal plates
              >suspended from a tripod).
              >
              >Jehanne

              Actually, that's how we discovered this little gem. We were using a
              portable firepit with an attached tripod and trying to get it going so we
              could have breakfast on a damp morning. The pit part was made from an
              old washing machine drum, pierced all over. The fire just dripped out the
              holes and could only be put out with sand.

              I have several period formulae for Greek Fire, but this is just so much
              easier :>


              Roderic Hawkyns
              Master Gunner

              Artillery lends dignity to what might otherwise be a vulgar brawl
            • marshamclean@rogers.com
              May I suggest a chinese restaurant wok? They come in sizes up to HUGE! and have no holes. They are iron and run from CDN$19 up. Baroness Tamara, from up
              Message 6 of 8 , Jul 2, 2002
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                At 03:35 AM 07/01/2002 +0000, you wrote:
                >Gaius and I will probably acquire a "portable firepit" one of these
                >days. (Imagine a large "bowl" constructed of articulated metal plates
                >suspended from a tripod).
                >
                >Jehanne

                Actually, that's how we discovered this little gem.  We were using a
                portable firepit with an attached tripod and trying to get it going so we
                could have breakfast on a damp morning.    The pit part was made from an
                old washing machine drum, pierced all over.  The fire just dripped out the
                holes and could only be put out with sand.

                I have several period formulae for Greek  Fire, but this is just so much
                easier :>


                Roderic Hawkyns
                Master Gunner

                Artillery lends dignity to what might otherwise be a vulgar brawl





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