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Re: [Authentic_SCA] Re: pourpoint question

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  • Gwendoline Rosamond
    ... I get them in book form. I have no idea why it was left to the woman, I m only just getting into the 15th century stuff - I usually work with 16th
    Message 1 of 24 , May 11, 2002
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      At 02:10 PM 5/9/2002 +0000, you wrote:
      >--- In Authentic_SCA@y..., Gwendoline Rosamond <dameg@a...> wrote:
      > > I've been lately looking at wills that are very late 14th century
      >and early
      > > 15th century and kirtle and gown have both been mentioned.
      >However, the
      > > most bizarre thing I've found is a "pourpoint" left to a woman...
      > >
      > > Cheers,
      > > Gwendoline
      >
      >Fascinating! How did you find the wills? And do you think that the
      >pourpoint being left to a woman might indicate that the word might
      >have been used for women's gowns/outer layers? Or possibly something
      >was left to a woman for recycling purposes, for their offspring's
      >use, or maybe because this lady was one of those cross-dressing
      >tournament-attenders I've read about in _Fashion in the Age of the
      >Black Prince_!

      I get them in book form. I have no idea why it was left to the woman, I'm
      only just getting into the 15th century stuff - I usually work with 16th
      century. From everything I've read however, I don't think that women would
      normally wear such a garment. These are mainly merchant class wills so its
      really hard to tell....

      >Apparently, cadres of upper-class ladies liked to get together, dress
      >in masculine fashions, and then attend tournaments and generally
      >raise a ruckus. Contemporary writings describe them as independent
      >and heartless, if I remember correctly, though those exact words were
      >probably not used. I'll have to go home and look this up..
      >
      >Marcele de Montsegur

      Well, the reference says "to Edith, their servant (servienti), one white
      "parpyne"" so it is most like a case of recycling...

      Cheers,
      Gwendoline
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