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Re: [Authentic_SCA] Kamakura

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  • Kass McGann
    Lady Fujiwara, I just saw that picture on your website of you as a Kamakura lady at Pennsic! It sent shivers down my spine; you look exactly like you just
    Message 1 of 8 , Nov 13, 2000
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      Lady Fujiwara, I just saw that picture on your website of you as a Kamakura
      lady at Pennsic! It sent shivers down my spine; you look exactly like you
      just stepped out of an old Japanese woodblock print. The background even
      looks like you're in Japan.
      >>>>
      You are too kind!
      >>>>
      Bravo! My admiration knows no bounds! Did you
      make the hat yourself?
      >>>>
      I did make the hat myself. It is called "tsubozoshoku" and it functions to
      keep bugs and sunlight from one's face. It also discourages the gaze of
      others, as we are supposed to hide our faces from all but intimates. It is
      made from willow basketry reeds with a silk gauze veil sewn to the edge.
      >>>>
      Do tell us about your garb!
      >>>>
      It is very simple, as are all things in the Kamakura period. I wear a white
      kosode in fuji broadcloth silk and red ankle-'ength hakama in a satin twill.
      I dyed the hakama myself, but it was a commercial dye. This fall, I am
      dyeing a pair of long (naga-) hakama with real safflower. Anyway, the uwagi
      or overrobe is brocaded with a pattern of pine needles. My homestay mother
      in Kyoto gave this fabric to me when she found out I was studying Japanese
      dress. It is actually a Autumn colour (pine), but August is considered
      Autumn in Japan.
      >>>>
      Do you have any good stories from Pennsic about you being Japanese?
      >>>>
      I do. Two gentlemen were at Pennsic that day and stopped me to take a
      picture. One was American and the other Japanese. Not knowing that I spoke
      the language, the Japanese gentleman said to his friend (in Japanese),
      ""Damn, she looks like the real thing!" It was the best compliment that
      I've ever gotten. These gentlemen are responsible for that picture you see.
      >>>>
      P.S. I hope you can get some pictures of your encampment up on your site! I
      would really love to see it.
      >>>
      Dearest Moshe,

      Not likely since my encampment is not uniformly anything. You see, Heian
      ladies don't "camp"!

      Fujiwara
    • Stephen Higa
      Shalom, Lady Fujiwara! I am very impressed at your hat-making skills! I don t know if I d ever have patience to do that myself. ;) I also love your Pennsic
      Message 2 of 8 , Nov 13, 2000
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        Shalom, Lady Fujiwara!

        I am very impressed at your hat-making skills! I don't know if I'd ever
        have patience to do that myself. ;) I also love your Pennsic story! I'm
        happy that you can actually speak Japanese...Not many Arab personae can
        speak Arabic, likewise Anglo-Saxon, Medieval Spanish (as opposed to the
        modern version which many people like to speak; any Spanish I use is 12th
        c.), Norse, etc. I'm just generally impressed!

        This is a picture of me at the Renaissance Faire. At the SCA event, I tied
        my hair up underneath the cloth and bound my legs with strips of linen up to
        the knees. I need to actually make a period kosode (the one I'm wearing has
        wrong sleeves; the modern kind).

        Oh, about 16th c. naming practices: would it be "given name" no "family
        name"? So, like Mitsuo no Higa? (Alright, Higa is Okinawan and Mitsuo may
        not be period, but I'll find an actual 16th c. Japanese name. Mitsuo and
        Higa are my mundane middle and last names).

        el Dio vos vala,
        Moshe
        --------------------------
        Todo callado, todo 'stava'n silencio,
        Como la nuve'n a la escuridad.
        "Miseravle! Porqué vienes agora
        Arecordarme del mal que yo pasí,
        Arecordarme de toda la mi vida?"
        --anon. sefardí
      • Kass McGann
        Shalom, Lady Fujiwara! I am very impressed at your hat-making skills! I don t know if I d ever have patience to do that myself. ;) I also love your Pennsic
        Message 3 of 8 , Nov 14, 2000
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          Shalom, Lady Fujiwara!

          I am very impressed at your hat-making skills! I don't know if I'd ever
          have patience to do that myself. ;) I also love your Pennsic story! I'm
          happy that you can actually speak Japanese...Not many Arab personae can
          speak Arabic, likewise Anglo-Saxon, Medieval Spanish (as opposed to the
          modern version which many people like to speak; any Spanish I use is 12th
          c.), Norse, etc. I'm just generally impressed!
          >>>>
          Well, I came by it honestly. It was my major in college (BA in Japanese
          Studies) and I spent my junior year living with a family in Kyoto.

          I might mention that I don't speak medieval/classical Japanese, which is
          quite a different thing. But I have a friend who does (Master Edward of
          Effingham, mundanely studying for his Ph.D. in the subject). He often
          baffles me with poetry in that language!
          >>>>
          This is a picture of me at the Renaissance Faire. At the SCA event, I tied
          my hair up underneath the cloth and bound my legs with strips of linen up to
          the knees. I need to actually make a period kosode (the one I'm wearing has
          wrong sleeves; the modern kind).
          >>>>
          The impression looks great, though.

          Have you seen my article on beginning Japanese garb:
          http://www.reconstructinghistory.com/japanese/Jap123s.html

          The figures aren't there yet, but I'll try to have them up today or tomrrow.
          >>>>
          Oh, about 16th c. naming practices: would it be "given name" no "family
          name"? So, like Mitsuo no Higa? (Alright, Higa is Okinawan and Mitsuo may
          not be period, but I'll find an actual 16th c. Japanese name. Mitsuo and
          Higa are my mundane middle and last names).
          >>>>
          I admit that I am not an expert on medieval naming practices, but it has
          been "Family name" no "given name" since time immemorial. I don't know
          enough to tell you, however, whether Higa no Mitsuo would be period-correct
          or not.

          Fujiwara is my surname. But it is terribly impolite to call someone by
          their given name in Japanese society of that time. Even my lord would not
          "embarass" me like that in public, though he may call me "Aoi" in private.
          Medieval Japanese is very well understood but a very different thing from
          the modern world. Many famous people are only known by their nicknames
          today (Murasaki Shikibu, Sei Shonagon, Lady Sarashina...) because of the
          fact that it was rude to be so direct as to say someone's name.

          Your correspondent from the East,
          Fujiwara
        • Stephen Higa
          ... Oh, wow! I recently was raving about the cool people I ve met/heard about on-line to some other SCAdians (I was explaining why I feel like the SCA is
          Message 4 of 8 , Nov 21, 2000
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            > Well, I came by it honestly. It was my major in college (BA in Japanese
            > Studies) and I spent my junior year living with a family in Kyoto.
            >
            > I might mention that I don't speak medieval/classical Japanese, which is
            > quite a different thing. But I have a friend who does (Master Edward of
            > Effingham, mundanely studying for his Ph.D. in the subject). He often
            > baffles me with poetry in that language!

            Oh, wow! I recently was raving about the cool people I've met/heard about
            on-line to some other SCAdians (I was explaining why I feel like the SCA is
            cooler when reading/talking to people about it on-line than when I'm
            actually at events ;)) and you and your friend were certainly at the top of
            the list!

            Why doesn't Master Edward have a Japanese persona? ;) Or does he?

            > Have you seen my article on beginning Japanese garb:
            > http://www.reconstructinghistory.com/japanese/Jap123s.html
            >
            > The figures aren't there yet, but I'll try to have them up today or tomrrow.

            Yes! thank you very much for putting that up there. I'm going to go
            looking for some hemp fabric sometime soon and try my hand at some sashiko
            quilting...Is hemp terribly expensive?

            Thanks also for the name hints...I'm at a university so I have access to a
            great library as well as some great faculty...I suppose I should take
            advantage of that. ;) I've definitely done it with medieval music, so names
            and costumes are next on my list.

            el Dió vos guadre,
            --Moshe ha-'Ebed ben Yishma'el
            (Don Mossé Mantega)
            (Sayyad Musa ibn Isma'il al-'Abri al-Kastilya)
            * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
            Sing for joy to the Lord, all the earth!
            Worship the Lord gladly,
            and come before him with joyful songs!
            (Psalm 100:1-2)
            * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
          • Stephen Higa
            Shalom Doña Fujiwara, I was wondering if you could help me with a possible Muromachi period persona: I want to wear more peasant-ish clothing, yet I also want
            Message 5 of 8 , Nov 22, 2000
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              Shalom Doña Fujiwara,

              I was wondering if you could help me with a possible Muromachi period
              persona:

              I want to wear more peasant-ish clothing, yet I also want to participate in
              more courtly arts such as poetry, calligraphy, painting, etc...If there is
              no way that I could be a villager and still practice those arts, then I will
              consider dressing as a lesser noble. Or perhaps I can be a zen monk? Of
              course, I would have to shave my head...Arrghh!

              BTW--Happy Thanksgiving, everybody!

              Your correspondent from the West (Western for now, anyways),
              --Moshe ha-'Ebed ben Yishma'el
              (Don Mossé Mantega)
              (Sayyad Musa ibn Isma'il al-'Abri al-Kastilya)
              * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
              Sing for joy to the Lord, all the earth!
              Worship the Lord gladly,
              and come before him with joyful songs!
              (Psalm 100:1-2)
              * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *


              ----------
              >From: "Stephen Higa" <mitsuo@...>
              >To: Authentic_SCA@egroups.com
              >Subject: Re: [Authentic_SCA] Kamakura
              >Date: Tue, Nov 21, 2000, 6:55 PM
              >

              >
              >> Well, I came by it honestly. It was my major in college (BA in Japanese
              >> Studies) and I spent my junior year living with a family in Kyoto.
              >>
              >> I might mention that I don't speak medieval/classical Japanese, which is
              >> quite a different thing. But I have a friend who does (Master Edward of
              >> Effingham, mundanely studying for his Ph.D. in the subject). He often
              >> baffles me with poetry in that language!
              >
              > Oh, wow! I recently was raving about the cool people I've met/heard about
              > on-line to some other SCAdians (I was explaining why I feel like the SCA is
              > cooler when reading/talking to people about it on-line than when I'm
              > actually at events ;)) and you and your friend were certainly at the top of
              > the list!
              >
              > Why doesn't Master Edward have a Japanese persona? ;) Or does he?
              >
              >> Have you seen my article on beginning Japanese garb:
              >> http://www.reconstructinghistory.com/japanese/Jap123s.html
              >>
              >> The figures aren't there yet, but I'll try to have them up today or tomrrow.
              >
              > Yes! thank you very much for putting that up there. I'm going to go
              > looking for some hemp fabric sometime soon and try my hand at some sashiko
              > quilting...Is hemp terribly expensive?
              >
              > Thanks also for the name hints...I'm at a university so I have access to a
              > great library as well as some great faculty...I suppose I should take
              > advantage of that. ;) I've definitely done it with medieval music, so names
              > and costumes are next on my list.
              >
              > el Dió vos guadre,
              > --Moshe ha-'Ebed ben Yishma'el
              > (Don Mossé Mantega)
              > (Sayyad Musa ibn Isma'il al-'Abri al-Kastilya)
              > * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
              > Sing for joy to the Lord, all the earth!
              > Worship the Lord gladly,
              > and come before him with joyful songs!
              > (Psalm 100:1-2)
              > * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
              >
              >
              >
              > This is the Authentic SCA eGroup
              > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              > authentic_SCA-unsubscribe@egroups.com
              >
              >
              >
              >
            • Kass McGann
              Oh, wow! I recently was raving about the cool people I ve met/heard about on-line to some other SCAdians (I was explaining why I feel like the SCA is cooler
              Message 6 of 8 , Nov 22, 2000
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                Oh, wow! I recently was raving about the cool people I've met/heard about
                on-line to some other SCAdians (I was explaining why I feel like the SCA is
                cooler when reading/talking to people about it on-line than when I'm
                actually at events ;)) and you and your friend were certainly at the top of
                the list!
                >>>>
                Thanks, Moshe. You do our hearts good.
                >>>>
                Why doesn't Master Edward have a Japanese persona? ;) Or does he?
                >>>>
                He does. He just had this one for so long that he is afraid to start
                calling himself something else for fear no one would know him.
                >>>>
                Yes! thank you very much for putting that up there. I'm going to go
                looking for some hemp fabric sometime soon and try my hand at some sashiko
                quilting...Is hemp terribly expensive?
                >>>>
                Hemp is terribly expensive since it's not allowed to be grown in the US. It
                often exceeds $18 a yard (more than silk!). I would suggest using linen as
                a substitute. It looks very similar and is from a similar plant. Go to
                fabrics-store.com for great prices. Also, since silk can sometimes be had
                for $6 a yard, try silkconnection.com. Just avoid making things out of silk
                noil (aka "raw silk"). It's not period and it tends to fall apart.

                By the way, sashiko quilting started in the 18th century. But if you're
                doing it for non-SCA purposes, go right ahead.
                >>>>
                Thanks also for the name hints...I'm at a university so I have access to a
                great library as well as some great faculty...I suppose I should take
                advantage of that. ;) I've definitely done it with medieval music, so names
                and costumes are next on my list.
                >>>>
                Good for you!

                Kass/Fujiwara
              • Stephen Higa
                ... Okay, thanks... ... Oh, really? I don t mean the patterned kind, but the utilitarian straight kind for repairing garments...would that be period? If not,
                Message 7 of 8 , Nov 27, 2000
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                  > Hemp is terribly expensive since it's not allowed to be grown in the US. It
                  > often exceeds $18 a yard (more than silk!). I would suggest using linen as
                  > a substitute. It looks very similar and is from a similar plant. Go to
                  > fabrics-store.com for great prices. Also, since silk can sometimes be had
                  > for $6 a yard, try silkconnection.com. Just avoid making things out of silk
                  > noil (aka "raw silk"). It's not period and it tends to fall apart.

                  Okay, thanks...

                  > By the way, sashiko quilting started in the 18th century. But if you're
                  > doing it for non-SCA purposes, go right ahead.

                  Oh, really? I don't mean the patterned kind, but the utilitarian straight
                  kind for repairing garments...would that be period? If not, how would the
                  non-nobility have repaired their old clothes? I love the look of
                  well-wornedness (not a word, but then again, I don't speak these Western
                  tongues so well ;)). With my Jewish garb, I have tried to get the same
                  "worn look" you see in National Geographic pictures of Middle-Easterners...

                  Moshe
                  --------------------------
                  Todo callado, todo 'stava'n silencio,
                  Como la nuve'n a la escuridad.
                  "Miseravle! Porqué vienes agora
                  Arecordarme del mal que yo pasí,
                  Arecordarme de toda la mi vida?"
                  --anon. sefardí
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