Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

RE: [Authentic_SCA] Re: Subliminal suggestions Learning How to Make Gloves

Expand Messages
  • Jeff Gedney
    ... As I suspected, for this I thank thee. Thou dost me overmuche honour with thy comments, both in my confirmaytion, and in thy addresse. from what I have
    Message 1 of 15 , Apr 1, 2002
      > No, Sir, you are not wrong. The buffcoat appears around 1615 or so but
      > takes 20 years to become commonplace. Even the Swedes, who were
      > known for
      > their buffcoats did not seriously adopt them until 1635 or so.
      > They were
      > also primarily a cavary armour and a proper one would be
      > somewhat unwealdy
      > on foot.
      > The buffcoat was of ox-hide, oil tanned, generally with fish oil, and in
      > the neighborhood of 1/4 inch thick, sometimes more. Those large skirts
      > would do an excellent job of protecting the thighs on horseback,
      > but could
      > fly out like unsecured tassets on the ground and draw you off
      > balance. While a coat may have been more flexible than a breast
      > and back,
      > it may not have been that much lighter, depending on the armour. It was
      > known for soaking up water like a sponge and then taking a week to dry
      > out. Master Luke Knowlton can attest to that, having actually
      > made one of
      > period weight and tannage. Then we went to battle in the
      > rain.......... Damn thing was three to four times it's weight when wet
      > and had all the style and flexibility of a wet rag.
      >
      > The references in period seem to be more of leather jerkins or
      > jacks made
      > of leather. I have never seen the word 'buffcoat' used in a
      > primary source
      > prior to 1600.

      As I suspected, for this I thank thee.
      Thou dost me overmuche honour with thy comments, both in my confirmaytion,
      and in thy addresse.
      from what I have seen of such coates they seem onerous, indeed, and the
      armes painfully inflexible. Should I have need, I shal stay with a coate of
      maille, or a leather doublette.
      Fortunately I am but a simple merchantman, and by Grace of God, have little
      need of feats of armes. Which is moste mete, as I am growen fat handling
      money, and as I accostom to balance my registers, I am less accostome to the
      balance of mine rapier. This is a lacke I shall remedy, a little, perhaps,
      but skill at armes is the result of a constante discipline, and I have not
      the time for this dsicipline, for the bankers and venturerers are hungrier
      for their returns than a Irish is for Aquavitae. I fearre that I shall never
      be so greate a complimente to a regiment than our good Hawkins. Perhaps it
      is enough that I benefit the realme by taking goode English wool and
      worsteds to France, and bring back that whych is common there, and less so
      here.

      Elias Gedney

      ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
      Love is like a boomerang, It only comes back to you if you throw it really
      hard.
      ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.