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Learning How to Make Gloves

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  • muirnenicormaic
    Greetings! My name is Muirne ni Cormaic and I m the lady from BBM that Isabella and Morgan has mentioned in connection with glovemaking. I m more than happy to
    Message 1 of 15 , Mar 27, 2002
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      Greetings!

      My name is Muirne ni Cormaic and I'm the lady from BBM that Isabella
      and Morgan has mentioned in connection with glovemaking. I'm more
      than happy to pass along the knowledge I've gained so far in
      glovemaking to anyone who is interested. :)

      I did teach an introductory class on glovemaking last Pennsic and if
      there's enough interest (and it sounds like there is), I will teach
      it again. Though I'm currently researching a more period method of
      making gloves, I do have a handout that uses modern patterns
      (particularly with respect to the thumb) to make gloves. It will take
      a bit of work to get the handout ready (part of it is already in
      electronic form, but some items need to be scanned), but I'm more
      than happy to send it to anyone who is interested.

      If you'd like to receive a copy, please email me at muirnesue@...
      and I'll send you one as soon as I can get the info. together. If you
      prefer a snail mail version, please include your mailing address.

      Yours in service,
      Muirne
      muirnesue@...
    • Steven Proctor
      Hey, Muirne! Welcome to the list! Ta Morgan ...teach the class... teach the class... :-D ... -- It s 6:15, she thought, and the newspaper should be here by
      Message 2 of 15 , Mar 27, 2002
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        Hey, Muirne! Welcome to the list!

        Ta

        Morgan

        ...teach the class... teach the class... :-D


        muirnenicormaic wrote:
        >
        > Greetings!
        >
        > My name is Muirne ni Cormaic and I'm the lady from BBM that Isabella
        > and Morgan has mentioned in connection with glovemaking. I'm more
        > than happy to pass along the knowledge I've gained so far in
        > glovemaking to anyone who is interested. :)

        --
        It's 6:15, she thought, and the newspaper should be here by now, then
        she opened her door and realized with disgust that the paper boy was
        still in her bedroom.
      • Amy L. Hornburg Heilveil
        ... you want to teach the class, you want to teach..... something is compelling you to teach the class you must teach........
        Message 3 of 15 , Mar 27, 2002
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          At 03:20 PM 3/27/2002 -0500, you wrote:
          >Hey, Muirne! Welcome to the list!
          >
          >Ta
          >
          >Morgan
          >
          >...teach the class... teach the class... :-D

          you want to teach the class, you want to teach.....

          something is compelling you to teach the class

          you must teach........
        • muirnesue@aol.com
          Oh, alright already! :) For those of you who have an interest, I will teach my not-yet-famous class, An Introduction to Glovemaking, at Pennsic War this year.
          Message 4 of 15 , Mar 27, 2002
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            Oh, alright already! :)

            For those of you who have an interest, I will teach my not-yet-famous class, An Introduction to Glovemaking, at Pennsic War this year. Please look for the class sometime early during War Week - Sunday, Monday, or Tuesday. Class will be limited to 10-15 people and will probably be scheduled for two hours.

            Please note: This is barely enough time to go through the basics - tools needed, leather and stretching, the process of sewing the glove. We won't really be able to do more than touch upon drafting your own pattern from scratch. To do all of that, I'd need to teach a two hour class every day for the entire week! This is definitely a "just the basics" type of class. :)

            Muirne
          • L Joseph
            ... Welcome, Muirne. Run like hell if they start suggesting that you save France. Jehanne ===== I do but sing because I must, And pipe but as the linnets
            Message 5 of 15 , Mar 27, 2002
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              --- "Amy L. Hornburg Heilveil" <aheilvei@...>
              wrote:
              > you want to teach the class, you want to teach.....
              >
              > something is compelling you to teach the class
              >
              > you must teach........

              Welcome, Muirne. Run like hell if they start
              suggesting that you save France.

              Jehanne

              =====
              "I do but sing because I must, And pipe but as the linnets sing."
              Alfred, Lord Tennyson, "In Memoriam."

              __________________________________________________
              Do You Yahoo!?
              Yahoo! Movies - coverage of the 74th Academy Awards�
              http://movies.yahoo.com/
            • Amy L. Hornburg Heilveil
              ... Jehanne , just because you think you see things in our posts doesn t mean that they are really
              Message 6 of 15 , Mar 27, 2002
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                >Welcome, Muirne. Run like hell if they start
                >suggesting that you save France.
                >
                >Jehanne

                Jehanne <save France>, just because you <save France> think you see things
                in our posts <save France> doesn't mean that they are really <save France>
                there. *I* have never <save France> seen such suggestions <save
                France> in the posts on this <save France> list.

                Jehanne <save France> is really very nice if a bit tich in the head <save
                France, Jehanne>, Muirne. Don't worry too much about her.

                Smiles,
                Despina
              • Amy L. Hornburg Heilveil
                ... YEAH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Some of us are very willing to sit in a class for two hours every day for a week if it means we know something and learn
                Message 7 of 15 , Mar 27, 2002
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                  >Please note: This is barely enough time to go through the basics - tools
                  >needed, leather and stretching, the process of sewing the glove. We won't
                  >really be able to do more than touch upon drafting your own pattern from
                  >scratch. To do all of that, I'd need to teach a two hour class every day
                  >for the entire week! This is definitely a "just the basics" type of class. :)

                  YEAH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

                  Some of us are very willing to sit in a class for two hours every day for a
                  week if it means we know something and learn something at the end.......

                  Smiles,
                  Despina de la has taken 6 such classes and loved each of them!
                • rowen_g
                  ... not-yet-famous class, An Introduction to Glovemaking, at Pennsic War this year. Please look for the class sometime early during War Week - Sunday, Monday,
                  Message 8 of 15 , Mar 27, 2002
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                    --- In Authentic_SCA@y..., muirnesue@a... wrote:
                    > Oh, alright already! :)
                    >
                    > For those of you who have an interest, I will teach my
                    not-yet-famous class, An Introduction to Glovemaking, at Pennsic War
                    this year. Please look for the class sometime early during War Week -
                    Sunday, Monday, or Tuesday. Class will be limited to 10-15 people and
                    will probably be scheduled for two hours.
                    >
                    > Please note: This is barely enough time to go through the basics -
                    tools needed, leather and stretching, the process of sewing the glove.
                    We won't really be able to do more than touch upon drafting your own
                    pattern from scratch. To do all of that, I'd need to teach a two hour
                    class every day for the entire week! This is definitely a "just the
                    basics" type of class. :)


                    I attended a class last year with a little history, materials
                    information, and the most basic of create-your-own notes, and that
                    took over three hours. I'd love to get a copy of your handout.

                    Welcome to the group. :)

                    Rowen
                  • L Joseph
                    ... Hey, Pot, this is Kettle. Guess what? Jehanne ===== I do but sing because I must, And pipe but as the linnets sing. Alfred, Lord Tennyson, In Memoriam.
                    Message 9 of 15 , Mar 27, 2002
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                      --- "Amy L. Hornburg Heilveil" <aheilvei@...>
                      wrote:
                      > Jehanne <save France> is really very nice if a bit
                      > tich in the head <save France, Jehanne>, Muirne.
                      > Don't worry too much about her.

                      Hey, Pot, this is Kettle. Guess what?

                      Jehanne

                      =====
                      "I do but sing because I must, And pipe but as the linnets sing."
                      Alfred, Lord Tennyson, "In Memoriam."

                      __________________________________________________
                      Do You Yahoo!?
                      Yahoo! Movies - coverage of the 74th Academy Awards�
                      http://movies.yahoo.com/
                    • Amy L. Hornburg Heilveil
                      ... We re being joined by Skillet? *grin* SMiles, Despina
                      Message 10 of 15 , Mar 27, 2002
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                        At 01:43 PM 3/27/2002 -0800, you wrote:

                        >--- "Amy L. Hornburg Heilveil" <aheilvei@...>
                        >wrote:
                        > > Jehanne <save France> is really very nice if a bit
                        > > tich in the head <save France, Jehanne>, Muirne.
                        > > Don't worry too much about her.
                        >
                        >Hey, Pot, this is Kettle. Guess what?

                        We're being joined by Skillet? *grin*

                        SMiles,
                        Despina
                      • Jeff Gedney
                        ... Leave me out of this... going back to reading my latest book, History of the worsted manufacture in England, from the earliest times; with introductory
                        Message 11 of 15 , Mar 28, 2002
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                          > >Hey, Pot, this is Kettle. Guess what?
                          >
                          > We're being joined by Skillet? *grin*
                          >
                          > SMiles,
                          > Despina


                          Leave me out of this...

                          going back to reading my latest book, "History of the worsted manufacture in
                          England, from the earliest times; with introductory notices of the
                          manufacture among the ancient nations, and during the Middle Ages", by John
                          James...

                          (Wonderful, and it generally concentrates on the Norwich area - which is
                          convenient for me, as Elias is from Yarmouth, and comes from a Norwich
                          family of Drapers... hee hee... twiddle twiddle twiddle)

                          Elias Gedney

                          ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
                          Love is like a boomerang, It only comes back to you if you throw it really
                          hard.
                          ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
                        • Kirrily Robert
                          ... No! Um. Sorry. You just reminded me that a friend was asking me about buff coats, and I said I knew some people who might know something, and I was
                          Message 12 of 15 , Mar 28, 2002
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                            Elias wrote:
                            > Leave me out of this...

                            No!

                            Um. Sorry.

                            You just reminded me that a friend was asking me about buff coats, and I
                            said I knew some people who might know something, and I was thinking of
                            you and Roderic. I'm not sure what his actual question was, but if
                            anyone has any general information on the garments, I'm sure he'd be
                            appreciative. He does both late-period SCA and plays with a fencing
                            group that does 1630s.

                            On another note, some other friends of mine were asking about the
                            Pennsic encampment that I believe is/was associated with the Trayned
                            Bands. 16th century English, high-authenticity, and I believe they
                            didn't do their thing last year but were active before that. Who are
                            that group, and are they intending on having an encampment this year?
                            Or, failing that, does anyone else know of any authentically minded
                            encampments, preferably late period focus, that are operating this year
                            and would be prepared to accept some newbies? Newbies to their
                            encampment that is, not newbies to the SCA nor to authenticity.

                            Yours,

                            Katherine

                            --
                            Lady Katherine Rowberd (mka Kirrily "Skud" Robert)
                            katherine@... http://infotrope.net/sca/
                            Caldrithig, Skraeling Althing, Ealdormere
                            "The rose is red, the leaves are grene, God save Elizabeth our Queene"
                          • Jeff Gedney
                            ... Roderic will correct me if I am wrong but... If by Buff-coat you mean a shortwaisted skirted ox-hide jacket worn under armor, then I think that these are
                            Message 13 of 15 , Mar 28, 2002
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                              > You just reminded me that a friend was asking me about buff coats, and I
                              > said I knew some people who might know something, and I was thinking of
                              > you and Roderic. I'm not sure what his actual question was, but if
                              > anyone has any general information on the garments, I'm sure he'd be
                              > appreciative. He does both late-period SCA and plays with a fencing
                              > group that does 1630s.
                              >
                              > On another note, some other friends of mine were asking about the
                              > Pennsic encampment that I believe is/was associated with the Trayned
                              > Bands. 16th century English, high-authenticity, and I believe they
                              > didn't do their thing last year but were active before that. Who are
                              > that group, and are they intending on having an encampment this year?
                              > Or, failing that, does anyone else know of any authentically minded
                              > encampments, preferably late period focus, that are operating this year
                              > and would be prepared to accept some newbies? Newbies to their
                              > encampment that is, not newbies to the SCA nor to authenticity.
                              >

                              Roderic will correct me if I am wrong but...

                              If by "Buff-coat" you mean a shortwaisted skirted ox-hide jacket worn under
                              armor, then I think that these are post-SCA-period by 20 years. All
                              references to them that I have seen are in relation to the English Civil War
                              era...
                              So I'd think that this is about right for the 1630's group, but not for the
                              SCA period.

                              here are a few links
                              http://www.vanessatreasure.co.uk/buff_coats.html
                              http://www.plimoth.org/Museum/cc-shoe.htm
                              http://www.megalink.net/~dschorr/DanPart3.html

                              While there are many references to "Buffcoats" being worn as light armor in
                              SCA-period (including one Victorian writer discussing the assizes of 1181),
                              none of the references are contemporary to period, all that I have seen are
                              post-SCA-period, and in many cases may be simply referring to what _we_
                              would call a gambeson as a "buffcoat", because that is what the writer was
                              used to calling leather coats.

                              If you mean some other garment, such as a short frock coat... then that is
                              post-SCA-period by much more.

                              As for the Trayned Bandes encampments...
                              I'll leave this to Roderic.
                              He is _much_ more intimate with the ECW and Sealed Knot societies.


                              Elias Gedney

                              ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
                              Love is like a boomerang, It only comes back to you if you throw it really
                              hard.
                              ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
                            • Stephan Barratt
                              ... No, Sir, you are not wrong. The buffcoat appears around 1615 or so but takes 20 years to become commonplace. Even the Swedes, who were known for their
                              Message 14 of 15 , Mar 29, 2002
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                                At 10:42 AM 03/28/2002 -0500, you wrote:
                                > > You just reminded me that a friend was asking me about buff coats, and I
                                > > said I knew some people who might know something, and I was thinking of
                                > > you and Roderic. I'm not sure what his actual question was, but if
                                > > anyone has any general information on the garments, I'm sure he'd be
                                > > appreciative. He does both late-period SCA and plays with a fencing
                                > > group that does 1630s.
                                >
                                >Roderic will correct me if I am wrong but...
                                >
                                >If by "Buff-coat" you mean a shortwaisted skirted ox-hide jacket worn under
                                >armor, then I think that these are post-SCA-period by 20 years. All
                                >references to them that I have seen are in relation to the English Civil War
                                >era...
                                >So I'd think that this is about right for the 1630's group, but not for the
                                >SCA period.
                                >
                                >While there are many references to "Buffcoats" being worn as light armor in
                                >SCA-period (including one Victorian writer discussing the assizes of 1181),
                                >none of the references are contemporary to period, all that I have seen are
                                >post-SCA-period, and in many cases may be simply referring to what _we_
                                >would call a gambeson as a "buffcoat", because that is what the writer was
                                >used to calling leather coats.
                                >
                                >Elias Gedney

                                No, Sir, you are not wrong. The buffcoat appears around 1615 or so but
                                takes 20 years to become commonplace. Even the Swedes, who were known for
                                their buffcoats did not seriously adopt them until 1635 or so. They were
                                also primarily a cavary armour and a proper one would be somewhat unwealdy
                                on foot.
                                The buffcoat was of ox-hide, oil tanned, generally with fish oil, and in
                                the neighborhood of 1/4 inch thick, sometimes more. Those large skirts
                                would do an excellent job of protecting the thighs on horseback, but could
                                fly out like unsecured tassets on the ground and draw you off
                                balance. While a coat may have been more flexible than a breast and back,
                                it may not have been that much lighter, depending on the armour. It was
                                known for soaking up water like a sponge and then taking a week to dry
                                out. Master Luke Knowlton can attest to that, having actually made one of
                                period weight and tannage. Then we went to battle in the
                                rain.......... Damn thing was three to four times it's weight when wet
                                and had all the style and flexibility of a wet rag.

                                The references in period seem to be more of leather jerkins or jacks made
                                of leather. I have never seen the word 'buffcoat' used in a primary source
                                prior to 1600.

                                Roderic
                              • Jeff Gedney
                                ... As I suspected, for this I thank thee. Thou dost me overmuche honour with thy comments, both in my confirmaytion, and in thy addresse. from what I have
                                Message 15 of 15 , Apr 1 8:27 AM
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                                  > No, Sir, you are not wrong. The buffcoat appears around 1615 or so but
                                  > takes 20 years to become commonplace. Even the Swedes, who were
                                  > known for
                                  > their buffcoats did not seriously adopt them until 1635 or so.
                                  > They were
                                  > also primarily a cavary armour and a proper one would be
                                  > somewhat unwealdy
                                  > on foot.
                                  > The buffcoat was of ox-hide, oil tanned, generally with fish oil, and in
                                  > the neighborhood of 1/4 inch thick, sometimes more. Those large skirts
                                  > would do an excellent job of protecting the thighs on horseback,
                                  > but could
                                  > fly out like unsecured tassets on the ground and draw you off
                                  > balance. While a coat may have been more flexible than a breast
                                  > and back,
                                  > it may not have been that much lighter, depending on the armour. It was
                                  > known for soaking up water like a sponge and then taking a week to dry
                                  > out. Master Luke Knowlton can attest to that, having actually
                                  > made one of
                                  > period weight and tannage. Then we went to battle in the
                                  > rain.......... Damn thing was three to four times it's weight when wet
                                  > and had all the style and flexibility of a wet rag.
                                  >
                                  > The references in period seem to be more of leather jerkins or
                                  > jacks made
                                  > of leather. I have never seen the word 'buffcoat' used in a
                                  > primary source
                                  > prior to 1600.

                                  As I suspected, for this I thank thee.
                                  Thou dost me overmuche honour with thy comments, both in my confirmaytion,
                                  and in thy addresse.
                                  from what I have seen of such coates they seem onerous, indeed, and the
                                  armes painfully inflexible. Should I have need, I shal stay with a coate of
                                  maille, or a leather doublette.
                                  Fortunately I am but a simple merchantman, and by Grace of God, have little
                                  need of feats of armes. Which is moste mete, as I am growen fat handling
                                  money, and as I accostom to balance my registers, I am less accostome to the
                                  balance of mine rapier. This is a lacke I shall remedy, a little, perhaps,
                                  but skill at armes is the result of a constante discipline, and I have not
                                  the time for this dsicipline, for the bankers and venturerers are hungrier
                                  for their returns than a Irish is for Aquavitae. I fearre that I shall never
                                  be so greate a complimente to a regiment than our good Hawkins. Perhaps it
                                  is enough that I benefit the realme by taking goode English wool and
                                  worsteds to France, and bring back that whych is common there, and less so
                                  here.

                                  Elias Gedney

                                  ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
                                  Love is like a boomerang, It only comes back to you if you throw it really
                                  hard.
                                  ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
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