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Olwen's Oddities

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  • Jeanne Harney
    In case y all haven t seen these, they re the arms of a bunch of Baronies in Marzipan for EK 12th night. That s a LOT of almonds!
    Message 1 of 44 , Jan 14, 2002
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      In case y'all haven't seen these, they're the arms of a bunch of
      Baronies in Marzipan for EK 12th night. That's a LOT of almonds!

      http://communities.msn.com/OlwensOddities/baronialarms.msnw?Page=1

      Jeanne
    • Beth and Bob Matney
      I think that bit of additional information is needed. The era in question is last quarter of the 10th century (975+) and the location is Islamic Spain
      Message 44 of 44 , Feb 28, 2005
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        I think that bit of additional information is needed. The era in question
        is last quarter of the 10th century (975+) and the location is Islamic
        Spain (al-Andalucia). The personna is a Christian woman of rank living
        under Islamic rule.

        IMHO. Both Christian (Eastern and Western) and Islamic cultures had strong
        rules about head-coverings and modesty for women. These light weight (token
        coverings) "veils" were usually (but not exclusively, cf silk caps found in
        Viking Dublin and York) white linen in close contact with the head and
        hair, but could also be supplemented or superceded by an additional more
        comprehensive covering such as a cloak or mantle pulled over the head. This
        was especially true for the more religiously devout or their allegorical
        representations (cf religious figures such as Mary) or under more
        repressive regimes (cf the Taliban of recent history). These "mantles"
        could (and frequently were) of colored wool or possibly of silk. The issue
        now being the color black. This color was certainly possible in this time
        period (blue-black or brown-black of dyes or the very dark brown of "black"
        sheep). It was not, however, very common. The earliest large scale use of
        it that I can find is 15th century. I would be very happy to find
        documentation to the contrary....

        The Spanish mantilla of today (as beautiful as they are) is
        post-reconquista and I have been unable to find earlier documentation.
        Sorry......

        If you chose to think of it as a small woven mantle (scarf or shawl) worn
        over the head and shoulders for greater modesty and the color being a
        personal eccentricity, I say go for it. But if it's a lace mantilla, that
        is another documentation issue....

        Beth of Walnutvale


        At 02:36 PM 2/28/2005, you wrote:

        >I think I'd say rather that white veils are correct for pretty much any
        >woman, anywhere in western Europe, in veil-wearing eras.
        >
        >There might in addition be colored veils in specialized or general use,
        >but I'd think nice white linen veils would be standard.
        >
        >Is that re-phrased in a useful manner?
        >
        >Colored veils might be used, but white veils pretty much always were worn,
        >until veils went out of general use.
        >
        >Ann in CT
        >
        >
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