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Re: painting fabric

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  • unclrashid
    ... certainly ... Rashid? ... I beleive I said that wood block printing is period. I also have discovered that modern textile paints really work better with
    Message 1 of 83 , Dec 28, 2001
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      --- In Authentic_SCA@y..., "Amy L. Hornburg Heilveil" <aheilvei@u...>
      wrote:
      > At 04:43 PM 12/28/2001 -0800, you wrote:
      >

      >
      > I'm honestly on my way out the door, but fabric stamping is
      certainly
      > period. I believe Uncle Rashid knows more on this than I.....
      Rashid?
      >

      I beleive I said that wood block printing is period. I also have
      discovered that modern textile paints really work better with
      stencilling than with block printing, so that is what I use. I know
      it is not precisely period but the end result looks the same, and
      since I would prefer it to be washable, I use modern paints rather
      than oil or whatnot as in period. I paint on fabric sometimes to
      get a look that I can't buy, so I just care what it looks like as
      garb, I am not attempting to do a period technique.

      I reccomend Decca fabric paints, the metalics look amazing on dark
      fabrics.

      To learn about how it was done in period, get the Dover book by
      Cennini "the Craftsman's Handbook".

      My impression is that this was used more for banners and decorations
      than for garb, but I may be wrong.

      Rashid
    • Jeff Gedney
      ... One cannot have petticoates enow, to confuse the blust ry windes and men of savage intente. However, I beleeve women should be surrounded by gentleness,
      Message 83 of 83 , Jan 2, 2002
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        > >I've got a rope petticoat half-done; it's mostly just experimental. I'm
        > >using a reduced version of the Alcega farthingale pattern for it, and
        > >some cheap nasty rope that's all prickly through the cloth, so I need to
        > >wear another petticoat under it. Bah.
        >

        One cannot have petticoates enow, to confuse the blust'ry windes and men of
        savage intente.

        However, I beleeve women should be surrounded by gentleness, lest harshness
        of environment translate into a harshe temperament, whyche is unseemly, and
        may suggest a coarse upbringing, whyche impediment I am certain no Lady
        here hath been hindered with.
        To that ende, as I have seen and dealt moreover with such ropes, though
        they are coarse productes of poor qualitie, but sometimes a saylor has to
        make do,m I shall endeavor to help thee.
        To use such a poor qualitie rope, passe it though a fierce flame, such as a
        blowtorch. This will burn awaye the splinters but the rope will be left
        untouched, unless thou leavest the flame in one playce too long.

        But one ought not do without the qualitie of goode rope, and goode hempen
        rope is goode to hande, and kinde to a laydies fingers moreover, being well
        polished, and can be had for not overmuch coste.

        What thou dost sayve in getting the cheape rope thou shalt surely spende
        severalle times over in ruint petticoates and in needless aggravaytion, so
        buy thee goodlye rope, and save the money later.

        Such junke as thou dost describe is not much good cept as basest oakum for
        caulking a shyppes sides, or as mattes for scraping dirt from boots,
        methinks.
        Avoid "manilla" ropes, "Jute" is better.
        Hempe is beste, by farre, and can be found on the web in numerous playces.
        Thou hast onlie to consult a searcher, and thou shall certainly bee
        rewarded with a plethora of vendors for such.
        Beware thee, though, that the tarres and oiles used to preserve anie
        naturalle rope may well staine, so thou may wishe to use a rope produced
        moste unaturally of Polly's Properlines, or such. These may give thee the
        necessarie weight and feel, but then be washable moreover, without rotting
        in the dresse as naturalle rope shall surely do, though heating it to drie
        it may be yet more ruinous indeed, as it ruin in great heates like
        sugarplate left out in the rayne, do be sure to hang it to dries ait and
        thou shall be well pleased.

        Elias Gedney
        +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
        Studium doscendi volutate quae cogi non potest constat.
        +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
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