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First cooking project

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  • Sunny Medlock
    I m going to my first event in my new group, and as it turns out, it is less of an event and more like a pot luck get-together. Whatever I bring doesn t have
    Message 1 of 18 , Nov 28, 2001
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      I'm going to my first event in my new group, and as it turns out, it
      is less of an "event" and more like a pot luck get-together.
      Whatever I bring doesn't have to be period (I just hate that, and for
      a university group too!), but I just got a copy of Platina and want
      to try out a few things.

      I found directions for "Sour cherry pie" and "Apple fritters" and I
      have a few questions about the ingredients.

      For the fritters, it calls for "flour meal". Is this different than
      regular flour, what should I look for in the store?

      For the pie, it calls for fresh and aged cheeses, but I don't know
      what kind of cheese would be appropriate for that. It also calls for
      some sort of pastry crust, but I can't seem to find directions for
      that anywhere.

      Thanks for any help in advance, it's greatly appreciated.

      Elisabetta Morosini
    • Amy L. Hornburg Heilveil
      I have forwarded your plea to Bogdan, who is better at this sort of thing than I. ... Appropriate for fresh cheese would be called farmer s cheese in your
      Message 2 of 18 , Nov 28, 2001
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        I have forwarded your plea to Bogdan, who is better at this sort of thing than I.

        I found directions for "Sour cherry pie" and "Apple fritters" and I
        have a few questions about the ingredients.

        Appropriate for fresh cheese would be called farmer's cheese in your grocery.  It's very young cheese.  Aged cheese would be something like a romano or parmesean.

        Those are the parts that I can say and be pretty sure of myself.

        Smiles,
        Despina
      • Amy L. Hornburg Heilveil
        Message 3 of 18 , Nov 28, 2001
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          And my darling husband writes to say:

          fresh: think farmers cheese.
          aged: parmesean is a good choice.

          for the crust at that time it's flour, water and salt.  ROLL IT THIN!!!!

          flour meal merely means that it doesn't have to be bolted forever.  A
          coarse flour would be a better match.



          "If I claim to be a wise man, it surely means that I don't know."
          -Kansas, Wayward son
          _______________________________________________________________________________
                                        Jeffrey Heilveil M.S.
                               PhD Candidate, Department of Entomology
                                        University of Illinois
                                           heilveil@...
                                       lab: (217) 333-2929

          A Bear's Paw and Base Vert on Field Argent
          _______________________________________________________________________________
        • Sunny Medlock
          ... THIN!!!! ... forever. A coarse flour would be a better match. ... Bogdan, and Despina, thank you so much! A non-SCAdian friend is already amazed at the
          Message 4 of 18 , Nov 28, 2001
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            --- In Authentic_SCA@y..., "Amy L. Hornburg Heilveil" <aheilvei@u...>
            wrote:
            > And my darling husband writes to say:
            >
            > >fresh: think farmers cheese.
            > >aged: parmesean is a good choice.
            > >
            > >for the crust at that time it's flour, water and salt. ROLL IT
            THIN!!!!
            > >
            > >flour meal merely means that it doesn't have to be bolted
            forever. A coarse flour would be a better match.
            > >...
            > > Jeffrey Heilveil M.S.
            > >...
            Bogdan, and Despina, thank you so much! A non-SCAdian friend is
            already amazed at the effort, and all I have done so far is read a
            book. With any luck, it will also taste good.

            By the way, can you recomend/know of any other Italian cookbooks that
            are pre 1600? I'm interested in anything I can get my hands on.

            Elisabetta
          • Amy L. Hornburg Heilveil
            ... No biggie. Just remember to taste as you make and you ll be fine. that s how Bogdan cooks and I m convinced it s why his food is to die for. ... I just
            Message 5 of 18 , Nov 28, 2001
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              Bogdan, and Despina, thank you so much!  A non-SCAdian friend is
              already amazed at the effort, and all I have done so far is read a
              book.  With any luck, it will also taste good.

              No biggie.  Just remember to taste as you make and you'll be fine.  that's how Bogdan cooks and I'm convinced it's why his food is to die for.

              By the way, can you recomend/know of any other Italian cookbooks that
              are pre 1600?  I'm interested in anything I can get my hands on.

              I just bought him one at Pennsic and I can't remember the name of it to save my life.  I forwarded him your request and hopefully he'll be able to remember the names off the top of his head.  I'm not good that way.  *grin*  If we don't get any more info to you today, I'll be sure we look at home on the shelves tonight and get back with you tomorrow.

              Smiles,
              Despina
            • Sunny Medlock
              ... that s how Bogdan cooks and I m convinced it s why his food is to die for. ... That s not a problem, and I really like apples anyway, so it may be hard to
              Message 6 of 18 , Nov 28, 2001
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                ...With any luck, it will also taste good.
                >
                > No biggie. Just remember to taste as you make and you'll be fine.
                that's how Bogdan cooks and I'm convinced it's why his food is to die
                for.
                >
                That's not a problem, and I really like apples anyway, so it may be
                hard to save them for the event. :)

                > >By the way, can you recomend/know of any other Italian cookbooks
                that are pre 1600? I'm interested in anything I can get my hands on.
                >
                > I just bought him one at Pennsic and I can't remember the name of
                it to save my life....
                >
                > Smiles,
                > Despina

                Thanks, the book info isn't urgent, just something for me to look for
                and put on a wish list in the future.
                Elisabetta
              • ginevra@shipbrook.com
                Two books I came across recently that you might like to get are: The Medieval Kitchen: Recipes from France and Italy , by Redon, Sabban, & Serventi,
                Message 7 of 18 , Nov 28, 2001
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                  Two books I came across recently that you might like to get are:

                  "The Medieval Kitchen: Recipes from France and Italy", by Redon,
                  Sabban, & Serventi, translated by Edward Schneider. ISBN 0-226-70685-
                  0, U of Chicago Press. This has a translation of each recipe, a
                  redaction, and in the back, each recipe in the original language.

                  "The Original Mediterranean Cuisine" by Barbara Santich. ISBN 1-55652-
                  272-X, Chicago Review Press. Also has redactions, translations, and
                  original language text.

                  I noticed when I did a search on half.com that there are two versions
                  of Platina. Which do you have?

                  -Ginevra

                  > By the way, can you recomend/know of any other Italian cookbooks
                  that
                  > are pre 1600? I'm interested in anything I can get my hands on.
                  >
                  > Elisabetta
                • Sunny Medlock
                  ... versions ... I have On right Pleasure and Good Health translated by Mayr Ella Milham. Thanks for the other titles. I will definately check them out.
                  Message 8 of 18 , Nov 28, 2001
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                    --- In Authentic_SCA@y..., ginevra@s... wrote:
                    > Two books I came across recently that you might like to get are:
                    >
                    > ...
                    >
                    > I noticed when I did a search on half.com that there are two
                    versions
                    > of Platina. Which do you have?
                    >
                    > -Ginevra
                    >

                    I have On right Pleasure and Good Health translated by Mayr Ella
                    Milham. Thanks for the other titles. I will definately check them
                    out.

                    Elisabetta
                  • Sunny Medlock
                    ... THIN!!!! ... Just out of curiousity, wouldn t that make it like a very tasty glue? I m just concerned since there is no fats or eggs or anything else.
                    Message 9 of 18 , Nov 28, 2001
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                      --- In Authentic_SCA@y..., "Amy L. Hornburg Heilveil" <aheilvei@u...>
                      wrote:
                      > And my darling husband writes to say:
                      > >
                      > >for the crust at that time it's flour, water and salt. ROLL IT
                      THIN!!!!
                      > >
                      > > Jeffrey Heilveil M.S.

                      Just out of curiousity, wouldn't that make it like a very tasty
                      glue? I'm just concerned since there is no fats or eggs or anything
                      else.

                      Elisabetta
                    • janeravenswood@yahoo.com
                      glue, homeade playdough or maybe matzoh. I would find it odd if it didn t have some kind of fat in it. Lard maybe? My mother-in-law used to make a great
                      Message 10 of 18 , Nov 28, 2001
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                        glue, homeade playdough or maybe matzoh. I would find it odd if it
                        didn't have some kind of fat in it. Lard maybe? My mother-in-law
                        used to make a great lard based pie crust. I use butter for my
                        crusts and my mom has a great oil based crust recipe.

                        Darka

                        --- In Authentic_SCA@y..., "Sunny Medlock" <sunnyday78723@y...> wrote:

                        >
                        > Just out of curiousity, wouldn't that make it like a very tasty
                        > glue? I'm just concerned since there is no fats or eggs or
                        anything
                        > else.
                        >
                        > Elisabetta
                      • Amy L. Hornburg Heilveil
                        ... You got it. Actually, many of these crusts are very tasty where they are in contact with the filling. They soak up the filling juices, particularly if
                        Message 11 of 18 , Nov 29, 2001
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                          > > >for the crust at that time it's flour, water and salt. ROLL IT
                          >THIN!!!!
                          > > >
                          > > > Jeffrey Heilveil M.S.
                          >
                          >Just out of curiousity, wouldn't that make it like a very tasty
                          >glue? I'm just concerned since there is no fats or eggs or anything
                          >else.

                          You got it. Actually, many of these crusts are very tasty where they are
                          in contact with the filling. They soak up the filling juices, particularly
                          if the dish sets overnight.

                          The crust was *literally* there just to hold it all together (well, and
                          provide starch to fill up the people eating). Basic function with basic
                          parameters. There is a dish of, I beleive, plum pie, where the crust was
                          served to the peasants in the street. Those in attendance at the feast
                          would only have eaten the filling.

                          Smiles,
                          Despina
                        • Amy L. Hornburg Heilveil
                          ... For my modern pies, I use lard. Nothing gives flavor like it, nothing tastes like it and there is no comparison when it comes to flaky. However...... in
                          Message 12 of 18 , Nov 29, 2001
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                            At 12:35 AM 11/29/2001 +0000, you wrote:
                            >glue, homeade playdough or maybe matzoh. I would find it odd if it
                            >didn't have some kind of fat in it. Lard maybe? My mother-in-law
                            >used to make a great lard based pie crust. I use butter for my
                            >crusts and my mom has a great oil based crust recipe.
                            >
                            >Darka

                            For my modern pies, I use lard. Nothing gives flavor like it, nothing
                            tastes like it and there is no comparison when it comes to flaky.

                            However...... in period it it was not used in pie crust, nor was butter,
                            oil, or any other type of fat (to my knowlege). Fat was used in the dishes
                            themselves to add flavor (it also helped to bulk up and keep one warm
                            during the winter), as well as coating certain dishes to help preserve
                            them. On the preserving side, you can find that in 17th c American cooking
                            as well.

                            Smiles,
                            Despina
                          • ysfaeleleanor@aol.com
                            Salutations, Something that I have not heard here yet concerning this is that the crust is referred to as a coffin and often was to be discarded, or given to
                            Message 13 of 18 , Nov 29, 2001
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                                    Salutations,
                                          Something that I have not heard here yet concerning this is that the "crust" is referred to as a coffin and often was to be discarded, or given to the poor,or dogs,
                              or maybe those poor dogs by the gate. ;-)  Two years in a culinary guild where I
                              believe them to have researched this is my only "documentation.  Comments?

                                                                                    Ysfael
                            • janeravenswood@yahoo.com
                              Ah, I guess I just have a hard time imagining not eating the crust of a pie-type thing and giving it away. I m a bit of a crust fiend(as is my one cat)to the
                              Message 14 of 18 , Nov 29, 2001
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                                Ah, I guess I just have a hard time imagining not eating the crust of
                                a pie-type thing and giving it away. I'm a bit of a crust fiend(as
                                is my one cat)to the point my husband graciously breaks off his and
                                gives it to me.
                                But if it's just there to act as an "envelope" for the goodies
                                inside, then I could see using it.

                                Darka


                                --- In Authentic_SCA@y..., "Amy L. Hornburg Heilveil" <aheilvei@u...>
                                wrote:
                                > At 12:35 AM 11/29/2001 +0000, you wrote:
                                > >glue, homeade playdough or maybe matzoh. I would find it odd if it
                                > >didn't have some kind of fat in it. Lard maybe? My mother-in-law
                                > >used to make a great lard based pie crust. I use butter for my
                                > >crusts and my mom has a great oil based crust recipe.
                                > >
                                > >Darka
                                >
                                > For my modern pies, I use lard. Nothing gives flavor like it,
                                nothing
                                > tastes like it and there is no comparison when it comes to flaky.
                                >
                                > However...... in period it it was not used in pie crust, nor was
                                butter,
                                > oil, or any other type of fat (to my knowlege). Fat was used in
                                the dishes
                                > themselves to add flavor (it also helped to bulk up and keep one
                                warm
                                > during the winter), as well as coating certain dishes to help
                                preserve
                                > them. On the preserving side, you can find that in 17th c American
                                cooking
                                > as well.
                                >
                                > Smiles,
                                > Despina
                              • Amy L. Hornburg Heilveil
                                ... Pretty much. But as I said before, the crust does soak up some of the flavor from the goodies and is often very yummy. Particularly if you make your meat
                                Message 15 of 18 , Nov 29, 2001
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                                  >But if it's just there to act as an "envelope" for the goodies
                                  >inside, then I could see using it.
                                  >
                                  >Darka

                                  Pretty much. But as I said before, the crust does soak up some of the
                                  flavor from the goodies and is often very yummy. Particularly if you make
                                  your meat pies a day or two in advance and let them set in the refrigerator
                                  until you leave. Sitting, combined with warming up through the day makes
                                  the crust definitely eatable.

                                  Smiles,
                                  Despina
                                • Sunny Medlock
                                  ... anything ... they are ... particularly if the dish sets overnight. ... and provide starch to fill up the people eating). Basic function with basic
                                  Message 16 of 18 , Nov 29, 2001
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                                    --- In Authentic_SCA@y..., "Amy L. Hornburg Heilveil" <aheilvei@u...>
                                    wrote:
                                    >
                                    > > > >for the crust at that time it's flour, water and salt. ROLL IT
                                    > >THIN!!!!
                                    > > > >
                                    > > > > Jeffrey Heilveil M.S.
                                    > >
                                    > >Just out of curiousity, wouldn't that make it like a very tasty
                                    > >glue? I'm just concerned since there is no fats or eggs or
                                    anything
                                    > >else.
                                    >
                                    > You got it. Actually, many of these crusts are very tasty where
                                    they are
                                    > in contact with the filling. They soak up the filling juices,
                                    particularly if the dish sets overnight.
                                    >
                                    > The crust was *literally* there just to hold it all together (well,
                                    and provide starch to fill up the people eating). Basic function with
                                    basic parameters. There is a dish of, I beleive, plum pie, where the
                                    crust was served to the peasants in the street. Those in attendance
                                    at the feast would only have eaten the filling.
                                    >
                                    > Smiles,
                                    > Despina

                                    Cool! Now if I could just find some sour cherries somewhere (I've
                                    only checked one store, everything but cherries...). I love
                                    strawberries, but for just starting out, I want to be true to the
                                    recipie before I start fiddiling with it.

                                    Elisabetta :)
                                  • roswtr@yahoo.com
                                    If you re trying something along the lines of Platina s Crust of Tame Creatures, where the appearance of the cherries is secondary, look in the pie filling
                                    Message 17 of 18 , Nov 30, 2001
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                                      If you're trying something along the lines of Platina's "Crust of
                                      Tame Creatures," where the appearance of the cherries is secondary,
                                      look in the pie filling section of your local grocery store. You
                                      should be able to get canned sour cherried packed in water.

                                      Rose

                                      --- In Authentic_SCA@y..., "Sunny Medlock" <sunnyday78723@y...> wrote:
                                      > Cool! Now if I could just find some sour cherries somewhere (I've
                                      > only checked one store, everything but cherries...). I love
                                      > strawberries, but for just starting out, I want to be true to the
                                      > recipie before I start fiddiling with it.
                                      >
                                      > Elisabetta :)
                                    • Sunny Medlock
                                      ... Ooh thanks! I didn t even think to check there, I was afraid of finding pie filling with all that sweet goo in there. I will have to keep looking, and I
                                      Message 18 of 18 , Dec 2, 2001
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                                        --- In Authentic_SCA@y..., roswtr@y... wrote:
                                        > If you're trying something along the lines of Platina's "Crust of
                                        > Tame Creatures," where the appearance of the cherries is secondary,
                                        > look in the pie filling section of your local grocery store. You
                                        > should be able to get canned sour cherried packed in water.
                                        >
                                        > Rose
                                        >
                                        Ooh thanks! I didn't even think to check there, I was afraid of
                                        finding pie filling with all that sweet goo in there. I will have to
                                        keep looking, and I have some really nice neighbors that I can
                                        experiment on...
                                        Elisabetta
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