Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

French base garments

Expand Messages
  • Amy L. Hornburg Heilveil
    I have a friend who is looking into 15th c French garments. Any ideas on the base garments? I told her I think it s a well fitted smock. Anyone.......
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 31, 2001
    • 0 Attachment
      I have a friend who is looking into 15th c French garments. Any ideas on
      the base garments? I told her I think it's a well fitted smock.

      Anyone.......

      Smiles,
      Despina
    • Danielle Nunn-Weinberg
      ... Yup. Smock, kirtle, gown. I ve never seen any women s outfits from middle ages through the Renaissance that didn t have a smock next to the skin. Cheers,
      Message 2 of 4 , Oct 31, 2001
      • 0 Attachment
        At 03:33 PM 10/31/2001 -0600, you wrote:
        >I have a friend who is looking into 15th c French garments. Any ideas on
        >the base garments? I told her I think it's a well fitted smock.
        >
        >Anyone.......
        >
        >Smiles,
        >Despina


        Yup. Smock, kirtle, gown. I've never seen any women's outfits from middle
        ages through the Renaissance that didn't have a smock next to the skin.

        Cheers,
        Gwendoline
      • Amy L. Hornburg Heilveil
        ... Thanks Gwen *grin* I already told her that part. The difficult part is, what type of smock and kirtle, similar to the English, with fairly tight, long
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 1, 2001
        • 0 Attachment
          At 10:37 PM 10/31/2001 -0600, you wrote:
          Yup.  Smock, kirtle, gown.  I've never seen any women's outfits from middle
          ages through the Renaissance that didn't have a smock next to the skin.

          Thanks Gwen *grin*  I already told her that part.  The difficult part is, what type of smock and kirtle, similar to the English, with fairly tight, long sleeves in the smock or a short sleeved smock?  Basic tank-style, no-sleeve kirtle or kirtle with short sleeves?  She has the gown down pretty well.  She had been putting lacing up the front of her smocks but I *really* don't think that's correct.  I think she ought to be using a more fitted smock that one has to wiggle into......particularly as she is well endowed.  More thoughts?

          Smiles,
          Despina

        • Danielle Nunn-Weinberg
          ... Ah you want one that is basically a t-tunic (proper, period construction) shape that has straight, fitted sleeves and reasonably snug. You want it long
          Message 4 of 4 , Nov 1, 2001
          • 0 Attachment
            At 09:35 AM 11/1/2001 -0600, you wrote:
            >At 10:37 PM 10/31/2001 -0600, you wrote:
            >>Yup. Smock, kirtle, gown. I've never seen any women's outfits from middle
            >>ages through the Renaissance that didn't have a smock next to the skin.
            >
            >Thanks Gwen *grin* I already told her that part. The difficult part is,
            >what type of smock and kirtle, similar to the English, with fairly tight,
            >long sleeves in the smock or a short sleeved smock? Basic tank-style,
            >no-sleeve kirtle or kirtle with short sleeves? She has the gown down
            >pretty well. She had been putting lacing up the front of her smocks but I
            >*really* don't think that's correct. I think she ought to be using a more
            >fitted smock that one has to wiggle into......particularly as she is well
            >endowed. More thoughts?
            >
            >Smiles,
            >Despina

            Ah you want one that is basically a t-tunic (proper, period construction)
            shape that has straight, fitted sleeves and reasonably snug. You want it
            long sleeved too. I've never seen lacing up the front of smock in period
            so, no I don't think that is correct either.

            The smock isn't meant to be seen at that point. Also, the puffy sleeves
            seem to have moved out of southern Europe in the very late 15th or early
            16th century.

            Cheers,
            Gwendoline
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.