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Re: Italian sumptuary laws, and question about odd lacing style

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  • Sunny Medlock
    ... what though... ... right on and off. They can t be ornamental in the sense of not having buttonholes , because at least one of those fellows in the fresco
    Message 1 of 10 , Sep 4, 2001
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      > Ah yes, I see now. I wonder if they [buttons] were ornamental or
      what though...
      > I mean, with the v-shaped back neckline, the garment DOES slip
      right on and off. They can't be ornamental in the sense of "not
      having buttonholes", because at least one of those fellows in the
      fresco is clearly wearing buttonholed buttons, but I wonder if they
      were really actually used or needed.

      If you're talking about "Allegory of April: Triumph of Venus (right
      view)", the fellow in the front with the gold over-garment and all
      the buttons, in my opinion, those are needed as that the garment is
      fitted with what I suspect is a seam at the waistline and a circular
      skirt attached. As for all the ones with the houppleande/pleated
      tabard variants from the research I have seen, those pleats are sewn
      to tapes to hold them in place (one at the bust line, one at the
      waist line and possibly one at the hem line, check out Elizabeth
      Bibari's book Dress in Painting(? or something like that), it has
      some good pictures of that detail), and I suspect that buttons or
      ties would be needed at the neckline.
      >
      > The sumptuary paper I saw was at this site:
      http://www.armory.com/~skuld/venice.html
      > I found it just fascinating...

      Just be careful if you are using that for Florentine clothing. In
      general, the Florentines were more soberly dressed than the Venetians
      at the same time (and more than most other Italian from what I can
      tell)
      >
      > Aoda

      Elisabetta
    • Venera di Nardiello
      ... Warning! Bad ACII art. This is how I do it. You can start at either end. Solid lines are on outside of gown and dashed ones on the inside. Start
      Message 2 of 10 , Sep 4, 2001
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        --- ivinian@... wrote:
        > One question: How do they get that peculiar lacing
        > in some of those
        > views, with the laces running horizontally from side
        > to side with no
        > crossings ("x's")? I wondered. It must be done from
        > the inside, but I
        > can't figure it out for the life of me.
        >
        > Aoda


        Warning! Bad ACII art. <G>

        This is how I do it. You can start at either end.
        Solid lines are on outside of gown and dashed ones on
        the inside.

        Start (with a basic bulky knot on the inside of the
        gown pull lace through to outside, straight across and
        down into corresponding eyelet on the other side)
        |________
        /
        /
        /
        /
        /
        /
        /
        /
        /________
        /
        /
        /
        /
        /
        /
        /
        /
        /________
        |
        End (I use a double half-hitch knot as it's
        easiest for me to undo)

        This is also known as spiral lacing.
        I prefer it over ladder lacing since I'm paranoid
        about things staying laced. <G>

        Venera di Nardiello

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