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re: food and timeline cutoffs.

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  • Jeff Heilveil
    Kahlen said: Im confused. I thought that if it was pre 1600 it was considered period. However it is not ok to use cooking methods which are post 1500... that
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 2, 2001
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      Kahlen said:
      "Im confused. I thought that if it was pre 1600 it was
      considered period. However it is not ok to use cooking methods which are
      post 1500... that leaves a hundred year gap. Or did I miss something?
      If methods were begining to be used that lead to a greater cooking
      renaissance in the 1600s, that doesnt make them not period. I really MUST
      be missing something here, please set me straight?"

      From the SCA webpage:

      "What is the SCA?
      The SCA is the Society for Creative Anachronism, which is a group
      dedicated to researching and recreating the Middle Ages in the present.
      <snip>
      Where did the SCA come from?
      The avowed purpose of the SCA is the study and recreation of the European
      Middle Ages, its crafts, sciences, arts, traditions, literature, etc. The
      SCA "period" is defined to be Western civilization before 1600 AD,
      concentrating on the Western European High Middle Ages.
      <snip>"

      So, for some of us, the cutoff of 1600 is merely seen as a help to remain
      in the Middle Ages and avoid the Rennaisance. If this is true, one needs
      to decide what is more important: the calendar date, or avoiding
      techniques and materials which are part of the Rennaisance? For me,
      especially for food, I try to avoid things associated with the
      Rennaisance. Yes, Turkeys were brought into England VERY LATE in period
      and served once or twice. So were some New World veggies. However, they
      are not representative of most of the middle ages and therefore not items
      with which I am willing to cook.

      In fact, I try not to use the late period sources for anything for which I
      do not have evidence of existing in the early 16th Century. As I
      suggested earlier, everyone is entitled to their own cutoff, but mine, for
      cooking, is around 1500 since that is when the cooking Rennaisance began.
      Not that is was likely that those changes appeared in the area of my
      persona until much later, but since the sources which survive are from
      places where the cooking Rennaisance did occur... I prefer not to use
      them. There are other cooks who prefer to use a hard and fast timeline
      cutoff, but as I said, to each their own.

      Just trying to help answer your question.

      Cu drag,
      Bogdan


      _______________________________________________________________________________
      Jeffrey Heilveil M.S. Ld. Bogdan de la Brasov, C.W.
      Department of Entomology A Bear's paw and base vert on field argent
      University of Illinois
      heilveil@...
      lab: (217) 333-2929
      _______________________________________________________________________________
    • ladymorwenna@yahoo.com
      ... Corpora defines the time period as pre-17th century European Middle Ages and Renaissance. Abigail/Morwenna
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 3, 2001
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        > From the SCA webpage:
        >
        > "What is the SCA?
        > The SCA is the Society for Creative Anachronism, which is a group
        > dedicated to researching and recreating the Middle Ages in the
        > present.
        > <snip>
        > Where did the SCA come from?
        > The avowed purpose of the SCA is the study and recreation of the
        > European Middle Ages, its crafts, sciences, arts, traditions,
        > literature, etc. The SCA "period" is defined to be Western
        > civilization before 1600 AD,concentrating on the Western European
        > High Middle Ages.
        > <snip>"

        Corpora defines the time period as "pre-17th century European Middle
        Ages and Renaissance."

        Abigail/Morwenna
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