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Re: [AustinLace] Butterfly migration

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  • Pat T
    Ok, I have an embellishment to my previous email. The Butterfly is from Pamela Nottingham’s previous book “Complete Book of English Bobbin Lace” (1976).
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 27, 2010
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      Ok, I have an embellishment to my previous email. The Butterfly is from Pamela Nottingham’s previous book “Complete Book of English Bobbin Lace” (1976). It was repeated in “The Technique of Bobbin Lace” (1995) but the diagram of the upper wing that was included in the instructions last week does not appear in the later book.
       
      I have now gone through all my Bobbin Lace books. I obviously need more books.
       
      Pat T.
       
      From: Pat T
      Sent: Saturday, November 27, 2010 8:30 PM
      Subject: [AustinLace] Butterfly migration
       


      Sometime it is nice to know where the butterflies come from.
       
      I was trying to decide whether to do a second butterfly like the one from the weekend or find something a little different, after I complete one from the class. I bought some nice colors in Guterman cotton today at Jo Ann’s buy one get one free thread sale (also bought more beads for spangling). So I started looking through my books.
       
      If you have Pamela Nottingham’s The Technique of Bobbin Lace, you should look at Butterfly no. 2 starting on page 103. I like that the picot locations are not marked. Gives room for some creativity.
       
      I am still feeling inspired by the class, Spangling bobbins, finished the first lower wing. I attached the bobbins for the second lower wing.
       
      During the class we attached the bobbins for the plaits and the leaves on two different pins. I did not like the look and wanted to move the leaf’s bobbins to where the plait started. Hilary told me the thread was too fine to undo a sewing so we used a whole stitch to pull the threads together.
       
      Today while attaching the bobbins for the edge of the lower wing I sewed in two pairs at two pins instead of 1 pair each. And I was pleased to discover that I was able to detach two sewings with the DMC Machine Broder no. 50. I don’t think I want to do that again.
       
      According to Threads for Lace the Machine Broder takes 42 wraps / cm whereas the Guterman coton 50 takes 40 wraps / cm. So very close but the Machine Broder is a little thinner. I have to wonder how many less weaves this will mean in each leaf when I try the butterfly in color.
       
      I hope all of you had a wonderful Thanksgiving. We did the Turkey Trot (Nathan and I the one-mile after Nathan did the 1K) then we celebrated near Elgin on my brother-in-law place out in the country with several friends and family. The cold was a nice touch.
       
      TTFN
       
      Pat T.
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