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Re: [AustinLace] Re: pillow stuffing

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  • Russell Montgomery
    Hello Karisse, Yes, it was expensive to use Spanish moss. I was surprised how much it packed down. You could use your own gatherings, but I would want to try
    Message 1 of 7 , Aug 18 8:26 PM
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      Hello Karisse,

      Yes, it was expensive to use Spanish moss.  I was surprised how much it packed down.  You could use your own gatherings, but I would want to try to make them insect free as possible and that usually involves applying heat such as baking in an oven and the resulting problem is the aroma.  A good example of this is sterilizing soil for your hot houses can be done in your home oven but the smell is horrible.  This is why I switched to wool blankets.  It was cheaper and I didn't need to worry about insects.  I'm assuming you will have insects and maybe that isn't true.  The European pillows aren't sterilized and that is why you are supposed to declare them as agriculture imports, even the customs agent didn't catch it and I failed to do that when I brought them back.  To me it is really hard to beat ethafoam for the cost [mine is free since it is used for packing computer equipment we resell so I have a source for it], it is easy to shape [you can use a knife or a foam tool], it is light weight.

      Also there are alternatives to Spanish Moss.  Hydroponics uses something similar and it is sterilized.  You buy it with nursery products.

      Just because someone has a "proper" idea of how you should do this, remember our predecessors used their ingenuity to get by on the limited income.  Look at some of the French pillows, the quality is in the roller and box,  but the rest of the pillow can be made from cardboard and paper.

      There were a couple of lace Nazis that told me I could not do things like make a pillow from something or attempt leaves until I had made lace for 10 years.  [Everything must be done properly with the proper equipment.]  When I asked Mary Frances if I could try making leaves because I thought I understood the concept, she told me I could try anything I wanted.  I might learn something that didn't work, but I might find things that do work.  The story goes that Edison didn't discover the light bulb until his 1,000th attempt.  He didn't call the other 999 attempts wasted time but acknowledged that he did learn 999 ways that didn't work.

      Ask Fran about this.  I use to come to her with an idea of what I wanted and usually she could find a way to accomplish what I wanted.  It might not be the way the books spoke of it but I succeeded like the ideas for the "tongue depressors" that I had her make for me.  They worked great but not something I saw elsewhere.

      Russell

      karissem wrote:

      Russell,

      It is so good to hear from you too. I have used dried grass clippings
      for some of my pillows and that works pretty good too. Do you think you
      could use tree moss that you picked naturally if you dried it good
      first? I am not too sure but I think it may be pretty expensive to buy
      from Michelles or Hobby Lobby.

      Karisse

       
    • karissem
      I know that if you applie heat you will kill the bugs but what about cold. Could you put the moss in your freezer for awhile and then use it? I was just
      Message 2 of 7 , Aug 19 6:31 PM
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        I know that if you applie heat you will kill the bugs but what about
        cold. Could you put the moss in your freezer for awhile and then use
        it? I was just wondering. Also with the heat in Texas what about
        spreading it out on the drive way in the noon heat. That is hot enough
        to cook eggs, No?

        Karisse
      • Mlkquilts
        Hi Karisse, I can answer this one from experience. A lot of bugs just go into hibernation when put into cold or freezing conditions. I had to do an insect
        Message 3 of 7 , Aug 19 8:03 PM
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          Hi Karisse,
           
             I can answer this one from experience.  A lot of bugs just go into hibernation when put into cold or freezing conditions.  I had to do an insect collection in college and my father caught me some cockroaches, placed them in a jar and set them outside our house in New York in the snow.  When I got the jar to college and into my warm dorm room they came back to life.  Good thing they were still in the jar.
           
          Michelle
           
          In a message dated 08/19/08 20:31:42 Central Daylight Time, KarisseM@... writes:

          I know that if you applied heat you will kill the bugs but what about
          cold. Could you put the moss in your freezer for awhile and then use
          it? I was just wondering. Also with the heat in Texas what about
          spreading it out on the drive way in the noon heat. That is hot enough
          to cook eggs, No?

          Karisse

           
        • Karen Martinez
          Only goes to show, Michelle, that those darn cockroaches are indestructable!  Worked for a pest control company before teaching, and we determined that the
          Message 4 of 7 , Aug 20 4:15 AM
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            Only goes to show, Michelle, that those darn cockroaches are indestructable!  Worked for a pest control company before teaching, and we determined that the doggone roaches could survive an A-bomb!  Love the story this morning!  Oh, and Karisse, Mythbusters did try to fry an egg on the driveway once, and they determined that it doesn't get hot enough.  Driveways can only fry feet.  Karen Martinez

            --- On Tue, 8/19/08, Mlkquilts <Mlkquilts@...> wrote:
            From: Mlkquilts <Mlkquilts@...>
            Subject: Re: [AustinLace] Re: pillow stuffing
            To: AustinLace@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Tuesday, August 19, 2008, 10:03 PM

            Hi Karisse,
             
               I can answer this one from experience.  A lot of bugs just go into hibernation when put into cold or freezing conditions.  I had to do an insect collection in college and my father caught me some cockroaches, placed them in a jar and set them outside our house in New York in the snow.  When I got the jar to college and into my warm dorm room they came back to life.  Good thing they were still in the jar.
             
            Michelle
             
            In a message dated 08/19/08 20:31:42 Central Daylight Time, KarisseM@hot. rr.com writes:
            I know that if you applied heat you will kill the bugs but what about
            cold. Could you put the moss in your freezer for awhile and then use
            it? I was just wondering. Also with the heat in Texas what about
            spreading it out on the drive way in the noon heat. That is hot enough
            to cook eggs, No?

            Karisse

             

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