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Jebb - solid Wood or Ply

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  • tubman101
    Hello New to the group and looking for help. just got my plans for Jebb and looking to get started. This will be my thrid wooden boat and is being built for my
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 26, 2005
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      Hello

      New to the group and looking for help. just got my plans for Jebb and
      looking to get started. This will be my thrid wooden boat and is being
      built for my sister. It will live on a trailer most of the time and
      used for day trips/fishing.
      So I want to be traditional as possible, but need a boat that is
      water tight when taken off trailer. My experience is with plank on
      frame has been that a few days out and she takes on water for a day or
      so. I was thinking a ply bottum on Jebb and solid planking or should I
      go with ply for everything? Or a bottum with a thin plank layer then
      ply on bottum?

      Any helpful advice would be great.
      Thanks
    • Ron Carter
      Tubman, I m having the same discussion with myself regarding Bagaduce. I really want the traditional construction but the boat will be a trailer queen and I m
      Message 2 of 4 , Oct 27, 2005
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        Tubman,
        I'm having the same discussion with myself regarding Bagaduce. I
        really want the traditional construction but the boat will be a
        trailer queen and I'm concerned about how much leakage a cross planked
        hull will exhibit. I'm curious to hear input from this group,
        Ron
      • John B. Trussell
        Although flat bottomed, cross planked skiffs are easy to build, they are not, in my opinion, suitable for dry sailing or life on a trailer. They dry out,
        Message 3 of 4 , Oct 27, 2005
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          Although flat bottomed, cross planked skiffs are easy to build, they are
          not, in my opinion, suitable for "dry" sailing or life on a trailer. They
          dry out, leak while they are in the water, and tend to get nail sick from
          vibration if they are towed any distance.

          Atkin drew a number of plywood skiffs to include Emma which is very similiar
          to Jebb, though 2 feet longer.

          You could build Jebb entirely out of plywood. To maintain a trditional
          look, you could make the sides two planks, lapstrake. The only caution I
          would offer is that plywood is a limp material and it needs more framing
          than traditional cross plank bottoms. An alternative might be to plank the
          bottom so the grain of the ply runs cross wise and double the bottom.

          Have fun.

          John T
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "tubman101" <tubman101@...>
          To: <AtkinBoats@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Wednesday, October 26, 2005 1:49 PM
          Subject: [AtkinBoats] Jebb - solid Wood or Ply


          > Hello
          >
          > New to the group and looking for help. just got my plans for Jebb and
          > looking to get started. This will be my thrid wooden boat and is being
          > built for my sister. It will live on a trailer most of the time and
          > used for day trips/fishing.
          > So I want to be traditional as possible, but need a boat that is
          > water tight when taken off trailer. My experience is with plank on
          > frame has been that a few days out and she takes on water for a day or
          > so. I was thinking a ply bottum on Jebb and solid planking or should I
          > go with ply for everything? Or a bottum with a thin plank layer then
          > ply on bottum?
          >
          > Any helpful advice would be great.
          > Thanks
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
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          > If you set out to build an Atkin boat, please do not modify the plans. If
          > you stray from the plans you do so at your own risk and Atkin & Co. will
          > take no responsibility for the performance of the resulting boat.
          >
          > The current Atkin boat plans catalog is online at
          > <http://www.atkinboatplans.com/>
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        • cartacreations
          Tubman, I m looking at the same issue with atkins Maud & Emmiline, similar to Jebb but a bit larger. I got to see a M&E at the Port Townesd Boat Festival this
          Message 4 of 4 , Oct 28, 2005
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            Tubman, I'm looking at the same issue with atkins Maud & Emmiline, similar to Jebb but a
            bit larger. I got to see a M&E at the Port Townesd Boat Festival this year that was planked
            with ply, sides and bottom. The builder ran cross braces over the bottom under the
            thwarts to add ridgidity to the ply.

            I'm considering going with ply for my sides, but clinch nailing them and using Sika to seal
            the laps. I want a solid wood bottom but don't want the issues of having caulked athwart
            ship planks. So I may instead layup the bottom out of longitudinal planks of cedar as on
            a dory bottom and epoxy them together (using rabbbeted edges along each plank to
            increase holding surface). If the planks are numerous and narrow, movement should not
            be much of an issue (cedar doesn't move as much as many other woods). I'm still
            gathering opinions on this idea however.

            Harry Bryan had a 2 part article in Wooden Boat a while back where he built his skiff
            "Daisy". In it he shows how he lays up a 2 layer cross planked bottom out of solid wood
            but epoxied together for life on a trailer or out of the water. Could be anoter option. You
            may want to order that back copies from WB.

            dave

            --- In AtkinBoats@yahoogroups.com, "tubman101" <tubman101@y...> wrote:
            >
            > Hello
            >
            > New to the group and looking for help. just got my plans for Jebb and
            > looking to get started. This will be my thrid wooden boat and is being
            > built for my sister. It will live on a trailer most of the time and
            > used for day trips/fishing.
            > So I want to be traditional as possible, but need a boat that is
            > water tight when taken off trailer. My experience is with plank on
            > frame has been that a few days out and she takes on water for a day or
            > so. I was thinking a ply bottum on Jebb and solid planking or should I
            > go with ply for everything? Or a bottum with a thin plank layer then
            > ply on bottum?
            >
            > Any helpful advice would be great.
            > Thanks
            >
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