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Re: choosing outboard skiffs

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  • Wayne
    ... with ... cedar, ... sides? Might ... batten ... 1/4 ... situation would ... These two boats are double planked and seem to work well.
    Message 1 of 12 , Aug 17, 2005
      --- In AtkinBoats@yahoogroups.com, David Lightfoot <dlight@k...>
      wrote:
      > Just a thought brought out by someone's suggestion to double plank
      with
      > plywood. How about a couple of 1/2" longitudinal layers of your
      cedar,
      > properly staggered and with the outmost layer overlapping the
      sides? Might
      > be a toss up as far as the trade off in time and materials over
      batten
      > seam. If you laminated with epoxy, would this force a limit to the
      > swelling/shrinking? I don't know for sure. A laminated beam with
      1/4"
      > stock seems to hold its shape pretty well. 1/2" might be
      > different. Anybody know or have a guess what the swelling
      situation would
      > be in this type construction for a drysailed bottom?
      >
      > David Lightfoot

      These two boats are double planked and seem to work well.

      http://www.gartsideboats.com/jessie.php

      http://www.gartsideboats.com/surprise.php

      Add Bill Garden's Tom Cat to the list as well.

      http://www.woodenboat.com/tcsample.pdf

      John Gardner advocated double bottoms for dories. However, their
      bottoms are quite a bit narrower than a skiff. Typical dory
      construction called for an inner bottom with an odd number of planks
      fore and aft and an outer, sacrificial, cross planked bottom. Kim
      Smith at The Dory Shop quoted that type construction to me for a dory
      to be kept on a trailer. Still wondering why I didn't buy it.

      Wayne
      In the Swamp.
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