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elon jessup

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  • adharvey2
    Boy am I glad to find this site!. Several years ago I purchased plans for John Atkin s Elon Jessup 16 flat bottomed skiff from the By-the-Sea website. Trouble
    Message 1 of 8 , Feb 23, 2004
      Boy am I glad to find this site!. Several years ago I purchased plans
      for John Atkin's Elon Jessup 16' flat bottomed skiff from the
      By-the-Sea website. Trouble was, despite being a lifelong cabinetmaker
      and woodcarver, this was my first wood boat project and the plans came
      with no "instruction book", just plans. None of my boat building
      books covered the building procedure of an athwartship plank bottomed,
      lapstrake sided boat, so I shelved the plans untill I had a clue how
      to proceed.
      In the mean time I have built a Ken Swan nez perce 13, (with
      instructions), just to get the feel of the marine ply and epoxy, and I
      bought Ian Oughtread's book on clinker plywood construction - so I
      think I'm ready to try the Atkins design. I'd like to run my
      ideas/assumptions by you people who know these boats and get some input.
      I figure I'll use 1/2" okume ply for the sides, as John Atkins
      allowed in his comments, and 3/4(18mm) okume ply for the bottom. This
      boat will spend 90% of it's life sitting on a trailer at 5-10%
      relative humidity, so I'll need the stability of the plywood. Since
      the frames aren't really full width frames at all, just topside
      frames, and aren't even perpendicular to the centerline, I guess I'll
      build the boat on moulds like a frameless boat and flip it over and
      install the frames afterwards. What I'm the least sure about is the
      fastening of the plank laps and the side frames. Mechanical or epoxy?
      Of course Atkins specifies copper nails, but I'm wondering about epoxy
      for the laps, or perhaps both. I'd appreciate any advice. Also if
      anyone could suggest a book that covers construction methods
      applicable to these designs I'd be interested in it.
      Thanks For any help.
      Andrew Harvey
    • craig o'donnell
      ... Try boat building in your own back yard by Sam Rabl - interlibrary loan - or watch Duckworks for a lost Chapelle article from the 50s dealing with just
      Message 2 of 8 , Feb 24, 2004
        >None of my boat building
        >books covered the building procedure of an athwartship plank bottomed,
        >lapstrake sided boat, so I shelved the plans untill I had a clue how
        >to proceed.

        Try "boat building in your own back yard" by Sam Rabl - interlibrary loan -
        or watch Duckworks for a "lost" Chapelle article from the 50s dealing with
        just this topic (which I uncovered and edited slightly; it's a great
        article and a realy nice little skiff).

        Go here and you might be surprised:

        http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~fassitt/canoe_mirror/jessup/jessup.html
        --
        Craig O'Donnell
        Sinepuxent Ancestors & Boats
        <http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~fassitt/>
        The Proa FAQ <http://boat-links.com/proafaq.html>
        The Cheap Pages <http://www.friend.ly.net/~dadadata/>
        Sailing Canoes, Polytarp Sails, Bamboo, Chinese Junks,
        American Proas, the Bolger Boat Honor Roll,
        Plywood Boats, Bamboo Rafts, &c.
        _________________________________

        -- Professor of Boatology -- Junkomologist
        -- Macintosh kinda guy
        Friend of Wanda the Wonder Cat, 1991-1997.
        _________________________________
      • Chuck Leinweber
        Andrew: First, a disclaimer: I am not an expert at boat building, and I don t even play one on TV. That said, I have read and talked about boat building a
        Message 3 of 8 , Feb 24, 2004
          Andrew:

          First, a disclaimer: I am not an expert at boat building, and I don't even play one on TV.

          That said, I have read and talked about boat building a bit. There are a number of ways to build lapstrake boats. I happen to like ply lap construction. Just within that category, there are several ways to build. The way Tom Hill and Iain Oughtred show is over moulds with ribands where you get the shape of the strakes by spiling, then gluing with clamps and no fasteners. John Welsford sets up bulkheads with longitudinal stringers to which the strakes are glued and screwed. He claims the advantage to this method is that you can butt pieces of ply as you work along a strake, rather than have to scarph one long piece before starting.

          One other method that would probably lend itself to this particular design is outlined in Tom Hill's book. In it, you glue one entire side of the boat up on a flat table, then bend it to shape. This only works for boats with flat sides, though, and it is not clear if it would be possible with half inch ply.

          Chuck
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: adharvey2
          To: AtkinBoats@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Monday, February 23, 2004 11:59 PM
          Subject: [AtkinBoats] elon jessup


          Boy am I glad to find this site!. Several years ago I purchased plans
          for John Atkin's Elon Jessup 16' flat bottomed skiff from the
          By-the-Sea website. Trouble was, despite being a lifelong cabinetmaker
          and woodcarver, this was my first wood boat project and the plans came
          with no "instruction book", just plans. None of my boat building
          books covered the building procedure of an athwartship plank bottomed,
          lapstrake sided boat, so I shelved the plans untill I had a clue how
          to proceed.
          In the mean time I have built a Ken Swan nez perce 13, (with
          instructions), just to get the feel of the marine ply and epoxy, and I
          bought Ian Oughtread's book on clinker plywood construction - so I
          think I'm ready to try the Atkins design. I'd like to run my
          ideas/assumptions by you people who know these boats and get some input.
          I figure I'll use 1/2" okume ply for the sides, as John Atkins
          allowed in his comments, and 3/4(18mm) okume ply for the bottom. This
          boat will spend 90% of it's life sitting on a trailer at 5-10%
          relative humidity, so I'll need the stability of the plywood. Since
          the frames aren't really full width frames at all, just topside
          frames, and aren't even perpendicular to the centerline, I guess I'll
          build the boat on moulds like a frameless boat and flip it over and
          install the frames afterwards. What I'm the least sure about is the
          fastening of the plank laps and the side frames. Mechanical or epoxy?
          Of course Atkins specifies copper nails, but I'm wondering about epoxy
          for the laps, or perhaps both. I'd appreciate any advice. Also if
          anyone could suggest a book that covers construction methods
          applicable to these designs I'd be interested in it.
          Thanks For any help.
          Andrew Harvey



          No flaming, cursing, politics, religion or public mopery. Please be polite. The current Atkin boat plans catalog is online at
          <http://www.atkinboatplans.com/>


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        • craig o'donnell
          ... For crossplanking, see also Gidge Gandy: http://www.friend.ly.net/~dadadata/short/gandy.html -- Craig O Donnell Sinepuxent Ancestors & Boats
          Message 4 of 8 , Feb 24, 2004
            >None of my boat building
            >books covered the building procedure of an athwartship plank bottomed,
            >lapstrake sided boat, so I shelved the plans untill I had a clue how
            >to proceed.

            For crossplanking, see also Gidge Gandy:

            http://www.friend.ly.net/~dadadata/short/gandy.html
            --
            Craig O'Donnell
            Sinepuxent Ancestors & Boats
            <http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~fassitt/>
            The Proa FAQ <http://boat-links.com/proafaq.html>
            The Cheap Pages <http://www.friend.ly.net/~dadadata/>
            Sailing Canoes, Polytarp Sails, Bamboo, Chinese Junks,
            American Proas, the Bolger Boat Honor Roll,
            Plywood Boats, Bamboo Rafts, &c.
            _________________________________

            -- Professor of Boatology -- Junkomologist
            -- Macintosh kinda guy
            Friend of Wanda the Wonder Cat, 1991-1997.
            _________________________________
          • steve
            Try Tom Hill s Ultralight Boatbuilding ...it details lofting and set- up of a flat bottomed glued plywood lapstarke skiff...don t be put off by the
            Message 5 of 8 , Feb 24, 2004
              Try Tom Hill's 'Ultralight Boatbuilding'...it details lofting and set-
              up of a flat bottomed glued plywood lapstarke skiff...don't be put
              off by the 'ultralight' in the title...I've built a couple of skiffs
              and canoes using his method...also I think you might be a bit
              heavy...3/8 for the laps and 1/2 for the bottom should be
              sufficient...

              -- In AtkinBoats@yahoogroups.com, "adharvey2" <cen67858@c...> wrote:
              > Boy am I glad to find this site!. Several years ago I purchased
              plans
              > for John Atkin's Elon Jessup 16' flat bottomed skiff from the
              > By-the-Sea website. Trouble was, despite being a lifelong
              cabinetmaker
              > and woodcarver, this was my first wood boat project and the plans
              came
              > with no "instruction book", just plans. None of my boat building
              > books covered the building procedure of an athwartship plank
              bottomed,
              > lapstrake sided boat, so I shelved the plans untill I had a clue how
              > to proceed.
              > In the mean time I have built a Ken Swan nez perce 13, (with
              > instructions), just to get the feel of the marine ply and epoxy,
              and I
              > bought Ian Oughtread's book on clinker plywood construction - so I
              > think I'm ready to try the Atkins design. I'd like to run my
              > ideas/assumptions by you people who know these boats and get some
              input.
              > I figure I'll use 1/2" okume ply for the sides, as John Atkins
              > allowed in his comments, and 3/4(18mm) okume ply for the bottom.
              This
              > boat will spend 90% of it's life sitting on a trailer at 5-10%
              > relative humidity, so I'll need the stability of the plywood. Since
              > the frames aren't really full width frames at all, just topside
              > frames, and aren't even perpendicular to the centerline, I guess
              I'll
              > build the boat on moulds like a frameless boat and flip it over and
              > install the frames afterwards. What I'm the least sure about is the
              > fastening of the plank laps and the side frames. Mechanical or
              epoxy?
              > Of course Atkins specifies copper nails, but I'm wondering about
              epoxy
              > for the laps, or perhaps both. I'd appreciate any advice. Also if
              > anyone could suggest a book that covers construction methods
              > applicable to these designs I'd be interested in it.
              > Thanks For any help.
              > Andrew Harvey
            • jkohnen@boat-links.com
              A friend of mine just launched a boat built like that a few weeks ago; a little dory built cross-planked skiff style, but out of plywood. Here are some photos
              Message 6 of 8 , Feb 24, 2004
                A friend of mine just launched a boat built like that a few weeks ago; a
                little dory built cross-planked skiff style, but out of plywood. Here are
                some photos that might give you some inspiration. It only took him a month
                from dreaming up the design to completion! You'll have to sign up with
                another Yahoo group to see these:

                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MessaboutW-Photos-A/files/MembersBoats2/DickMitschsDory/

                1/2" ply on the sides and 3/4" on the bottom is awfully heavy construction!
                I agree with Steve that 3/8" on the sides and 1/2" on the bottom is plenty.
                Run the grain of the face veneers of the plywood across the bottom for best
                strength.

                Epoxy will hold the laps fine.

                Years ago Wooden Boat ran a couple of artcles about building a flat-bottom
                skiff that cover the construction quite well, in numbers 30 and 31, which
                are out of print. They may still sell a booklet with the articles in it,
                look for something about building the Yankee Tender in their catalog.

                On Tue, 24 Feb 2004 05:59:43 -0000, Andrew wrote:
                > Boy am I glad to find this site!. Several years ago I purchased plans
                > for John Atkin's Elon Jessup 16' flat bottomed skiff from the
                > By-the-Sea website. Trouble was, despite being a lifelong cabinetmaker
                > and woodcarver, this was my first wood boat project and the plans came
                > with no "instruction book", just plans. None of my boat building
                > books covered the building procedure of an athwartship plank bottomed,
                > lapstrake sided boat, so I shelved the plans untill I had a clue how
                > to proceed.
                > ...
                > I figure I'll use 1/2" okume ply for the sides, as John Atkins
                > allowed in his comments, and 3/4(18mm) okume ply for the bottom.
                > ...
                > What I'm the least sure about is the
                > fastening of the plank laps and the side frames. Mechanical or epoxy?
                > ...

                --
                John <jkohnen@...>
                http://www.boat-links.com/
                One boat just leads to another.
                <John Kohnen>
              • craig o'donnell
                ... Well, it depends . An old-style Chesapeake skiff would be the sort of boat you can stand on the gunwale of without it listing much. If you want a lot of
                Message 7 of 8 , Feb 25, 2004
                  >Try Tom Hill's 'Ultralight Boatbuilding'...it details lofting and set-
                  >up of a flat bottomed glued plywood lapstarke skiff...don't be put
                  >off by the 'ultralight' in the title...I've built a couple of skiffs
                  >and canoes using his method...also I think you might be a bit
                  >heavy...3/8 for the laps and 1/2 for the bottom should be
                  >sufficient...

                  Well, "it depends". An old-style Chesapeake skiff would be the sort of boat
                  you can stand on the gunwale of without it listing much. If you want a lot
                  of stability, a 3/4 or 1" bottom will put it where it matters. Don't try
                  standing on the gunwale of a CLC Jimmy Skiff (I tried it by accident once
                  and wound up very wet). The Jimmy Skiff is otherwise a really nice
                  lightweight sailing skiff.
                  --
                  Craig O'Donnell
                  Sinepuxent Ancestors & Boats
                  <http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~fassitt/>
                  The Proa FAQ <http://boat-links.com/proafaq.html>
                  The Cheap Pages <http://www.friend.ly.net/~dadadata/>
                  Sailing Canoes, Polytarp Sails, Bamboo, Chinese Junks,
                  American Proas, the Bolger Boat Honor Roll,
                  Plywood Boats, Bamboo Rafts, &c.
                  _________________________________

                  -- Professor of Boatology -- Junkomologist
                  -- Macintosh kinda guy
                  Friend of Wanda the Wonder Cat, 1991-1997.
                  _________________________________
                • Billy
                  I know this is a very old thread but I am looking at elon jessup too as my next one. Would it be feasible to use 6mm ply for sides and two layers of 6mm for
                  Message 8 of 8 , Nov 30, 2010
                    I know this is a very old thread but I am looking at elon jessup too as my next one. Would it be feasible to use 6mm ply for sides and two layers of 6mm for the bottom? Glued lap per Hill and Oughtred. Closer spaced side frames and an open inwale and outwale system? I am hoping that the closer/more frames and gunwale system will compensate for some of the lightness of the lighter ply. All I have is 6mm ply left over from my last boat ( not an Atkin design) and really can't afford to buy more ply at the moment.
                    How many other Atkins boats not specified for ply are suitable for ply construction? Which ones? I am hoping to build HAVEN someday, anybody know of any that have been built. I reall like RUSSELL R too but HAVEN really lights my fire. Thanks for any help.

                    --- In AtkinBoats@yahoogroups.com, jkohnen@... wrote:
                    >
                    > A friend of mine just launched a boat built like that a few weeks ago; a
                    > little dory built cross-planked skiff style, but out of plywood. Here are
                    > some photos that might give you some inspiration. It only took him a month
                    > from dreaming up the design to completion! You'll have to sign up with
                    > another Yahoo group to see these:
                    >
                    > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MessaboutW-Photos-A/files/MembersBoats2/DickMitschsDory/
                    >
                    > 1/2" ply on the sides and 3/4" on the bottom is awfully heavy construction!
                    > I agree with Steve that 3/8" on the sides and 1/2" on the bottom is plenty.
                    > Run the grain of the face veneers of the plywood across the bottom for best
                    > strength.
                    >
                    > Epoxy will hold the laps fine.
                    >
                    > Years ago Wooden Boat ran a couple of artcles about building a flat-bottom
                    > skiff that cover the construction quite well, in numbers 30 and 31, which
                    > are out of print. They may still sell a booklet with the articles in it,
                    > look for something about building the Yankee Tender in their catalog.
                    >
                    > On Tue, 24 Feb 2004 05:59:43 -0000, Andrew wrote:
                    > > Boy am I glad to find this site!. Several years ago I purchased plans
                    > > for John Atkin's Elon Jessup 16' flat bottomed skiff from the
                    > > By-the-Sea website. Trouble was, despite being a lifelong cabinetmaker
                    > > and woodcarver, this was my first wood boat project and the plans came
                    > > with no "instruction book", just plans. None of my boat building
                    > > books covered the building procedure of an athwartship plank bottomed,
                    > > lapstrake sided boat, so I shelved the plans untill I had a clue how
                    > > to proceed.
                    > > ...
                    > > I figure I'll use 1/2" okume ply for the sides, as John Atkins
                    > > allowed in his comments, and 3/4(18mm) okume ply for the bottom.
                    > > ...
                    > > What I'm the least sure about is the
                    > > fastening of the plank laps and the side frames. Mechanical or epoxy?
                    > > ...
                    >
                    > --
                    > John <jkohnen@...>
                    > http://www.boat-links.com/
                    > One boat just leads to another.
                    > <John Kohnen>
                    >
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