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Re: Small air cooled inboard motors

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  • Lewis E. Gordon
    I m sorry! I forget the link: http://zf-marine.com/ZFR/index.cfm
    Message 1 of 12 , Apr 11, 2005
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      I'm sorry! I forget the link:

      http://zf-marine.com/ZFR/index.cfm


      --- In AtkinBoats@yahoogroups.com, "Lewis E. Gordon"
      <l_gordon_nica@y...> wrote:
      >
      > Here is the link for ZF/Hurth marine transmission web site. Select
      > transmissions/engine matching program/select brands for a list of
      > supported manufactures. It is interesting that Hatz is not listed for
      > any model. The prices shown on Northern Tool seem a little high. For
      > that money you can get a Kubota like Mr. White has on his Rescue
      > Minor. That is one good engine and 800 hours already? Wow!
      >
      > If you want to use a smaller industrial engine like the HATZ, you will
      > have to do some improvising with a belt drive like Mr. White did. I'm
      > sorry to hear that he no longer has a reverse gear. He's right that
      > it's not used much, but still for the peace of mind.... (Who am I to
      > talk? I'm missing a spring on my 30 HP Tohatsu and I don't have
      > reverse now either.)
      >
      > Good luck!
      >
      > Lewis
      >
      >
      > --- In AtkinBoats@yahoogroups.com, "dmede808" <dmede808@y...> wrote:
      > >
      > > Thanks for the shaft load conversion, thats good to know. I agree,
      > 1:1 at those rpms is
      > > probably not ideal. They seem to be easy enough to get here in the
      > US. Quite a few
      > > dealers including online
      > (http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/
      > > ProductDisplay?storeId=6970&productId=347&R=347)
      > >
      > > They range between $1500 - $1900 I think.
      > >
      > > The issue I am running into is getting info on suitable gearboxes.
      > HATZ lists several
      > > gearboxes in thier "additional equipment" PDF online but the main US
      > dealer doesn't seem
      > > to now anything about them. Without a bolt on option for neutral,
      > reverse and gear
      > > reduction I may not be able to use these motors. I am also
      > concerned that the higher
      > > RPMs with the single cylinder will cause more vibration than the
      > Palmer Baby Husky spec'd
      > > for this boat.
      > >
    • jkohnen@boat-links.com
      The Atkins specified a two-bladed, Type E Columbian, 10 inches in diameter b 6 inches in pitch. The speed of the skiff should be a good 8 m.p.h. The Baby
      Message 2 of 12 , Apr 12, 2005
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        The Atkins specified a "two-bladed, Type E Columbian, 10 inches in diameter
        b 6 inches in pitch. The speed of the skiff should be a good 8 m.p.h." The
        Baby Huskie (BH) had a bore of 3 1/16" and a stroke of 3 1/2" for a
        displacement of 25 cu. in.

        On Tue, 05 Apr 2005 23:20:08 -0000, Mike D wrote:
        >
        > ...
        > Does anyone know all these facts for the Baby Husky and the prop
        > speced for the Victor Slocum?

        --
        John <jkohnen@...>
        http://www.boat-links.com/
        Never put off until tomorrow what you can do the day after tomorrow.
        <Mark Twain>
      • jkohnen@boat-links.com
        You can easily gear down the Hatz with a belt or a chain between the engine or gearbox and the prop shaft. There s been some discussion about using
        Message 3 of 12 , Apr 12, 2005
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          You can easily "gear down" the Hatz with a belt or a chain between the
          engine or gearbox and the prop shaft.

          There's been some discussion about using air-cooled engine in boats over on
          the Western Oregon Messabout group, where a friend of mine suggested using
          an outboard lower unit as a reverse gear for a vertical-shaft engine. Lying
          awake the other night I had a revelation -- why does the crankshaft of a
          horizontal shaft engine, like your Hatz, have to be parallel with the
          centerline? If you lay an outboard lower unit on its side, with the output
          shaft coupled to the prop shaft and the input shaft lying athwartships,
          mount the engine near it with it's shaft parallel with the lower unit's
          input shaft, then hook them together with appropriate belts, pulley, chains,
          sprockets or whatever, wouldn't it be a good, cheap way to get a reverse
          gear? Or did I just have too much pizza before going to bed... <g>

          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MessaboutW/

          On Wed, 06 Apr 2005 16:03:22 -0000, dmede808 wrote:
          > ...
          > As you mentioned, RPMs are one of my big concerns. The small diesel I
          found delivers
          > 7.6hp at max 3600rpms and idles at 800rpms. Highest torque is 13.5lbs.ft
          at 2000rpms.
          > It delivers roughly 5hp at max torque 2000rpm. Probably higher RPM range
          than the
          > Palmer. The Palmer was rated at 6hp at 2500rpms.
          > ...

          --
          John <jkohnen@...>
          http://www.boat-links.com/
          Correlation does not imply causation; except, of course, to your cat.
          <Craig O'Donnell>
        • jkohnen@boat-links.com
          Take a cue from Robb and mount the engine on rubber. I think I d make a subframe that holds both the engine and gearbox, so you won t have any problems with
          Message 4 of 12 , Apr 12, 2005
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            Take a cue from Robb and mount the engine on rubber. I think I'd make a
            subframe that holds both the engine and gearbox, so you won't have any
            problems with belt or chain tension -- and possible transmitted vibration,
            then mount that subframe on rubber mounts. They sell expensive cushion
            couplings for marine engines, but you can probably find something at your
            local bearing store that will work fine between the gearbox and prop shaft
            with a low-horsepower engine. The inboard end of the prop shaft would be
            supported by a combination thrust/radial bearing, readily available at the
            bearing house.

            An air-cooled engine (especially a diesel!) is going to be noisier than the
            Baby Huskie too. You might want to think about a soundproofed engine box
            with air ducted to, and away, from the engine.

            On Mon, 11 Apr 2005 18:47:40 -0000, dmede808 (what's your name anyway?)
            wrote:
            > ...
            > I am also concerned that the higher
            > RPMs with the single cylinder will cause more vibration than the Palmer
            Baby Husky spec'd
            > for this boat.

            --
            John <jkohnen@...>
            http://www.boat-links.com/
            "Necessity is the mother of invention" is a silly proverb.
            "Necessity is the mother of futile dodges" is much nearer the truth.
            <Alfred North Whitehead>
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