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  • adharvey2
    My seemingly endless quest to pick a boat for fishing and day cruising on Flathead Lake (the largest natural fresh water lake west of the Mississippi) may be
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 2, 2004
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      My seemingly endless quest to pick a boat for fishing and day cruising
      on Flathead Lake (the largest natural fresh water lake west of the
      Mississippi) may be nearing a resolution. I had no luck finding a
      easily built contemporary design that met my requirements. All I
      require is a nice sheer line, a nearly plumb bow, maybe a little
      tumblehome, safety in a four foot chop, a small house with an enclosed
      head (the ladies, you know), 15-20 mph, and room in the cockpit for
      3-4 people to troll for lake trout or jig for whitefish. Sounds simple
      enough to me! I almost went for Karl Staumbaugh's Bay Power Cruiser
      (cmdboats.com), but the 80hp outboard, wide transom, and stich & glue
      construction just weren't "me". I looked a long while at Ninegret, but
      I didn't like the lines quite as much as the older boats, and the
      outboard well and box take alot of room from the cockpit.
      So I'm left with three Atkins designs: Tang, Little Water, and Magic
      Minnow (I may have mentioned in an earlier post that I was limited to
      twenty feet due to shop size - but the sawzall took care of that).
      What I'm not able to judge for myself is the relaive difficulty and
      time required to build these three boats. Clearly Tang is the easiest,
      with it's straight sections and simple house, and I'd guess that
      Little Water, with it's round bilge, tunnel stern, and greater glass
      area would be the most time consuming.
      I sure could use a more in depth comparison by somebody who has built
      traditionally constructed boats before. I am a cabinetmaker and
      funiture builder/restorer, but my boatbuilding experience so far has
      been limited to sheet plywood. I'd be interested in any comments
      regarding looks, practicality, ease of buiding, alternate building
      methods, or any other aspects of these three boats (or suggetions of
      other boats!)
      Andrew Harvey
    • adharvey2
      Forgot to mention - whatever I build will have to sit out the winter on a trailer at 10 - 20 below zero and 10% relative humidity.
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 2, 2004
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        Forgot to mention - whatever I build will have to sit out the winter
        on a trailer at 10 - 20 below zero and 10% relative humidity.

        --- In AtkinBoats@yahoogroups.com, "adharvey2" <cen67858@c...> wrote:
        >
        > My seemingly endless quest to pick a boat for fishing and day cruising
        > on Flathead Lake (the largest natural fresh water lake west of the
        > Mississippi) may be nearing a resolution. I had no luck finding a
        > easily built contemporary design that met my requirements. All I
        > require is a nice sheer line, a nearly plumb bow, maybe a little
        > tumblehome, safety in a four foot chop, a small house with an enclosed
        > head (the ladies, you know), 15-20 mph, and room in the cockpit for
        > 3-4 people to troll for lake trout or jig for whitefish. Sounds simple
        > enough to me! I almost went for Karl Staumbaugh's Bay Power Cruiser
        > (cmdboats.com), but the 80hp outboard, wide transom, and stich & glue
        > construction just weren't "me". I looked a long while at Ninegret, but
        > I didn't like the lines quite as much as the older boats, and the
        > outboard well and box take alot of room from the cockpit.
        > So I'm left with three Atkins designs: Tang, Little Water, and Magic
        > Minnow (I may have mentioned in an earlier post that I was limited to
        > twenty feet due to shop size - but the sawzall took care of that).
        > What I'm not able to judge for myself is the relaive difficulty and
        > time required to build these three boats. Clearly Tang is the easiest,
        > with it's straight sections and simple house, and I'd guess that
        > Little Water, with it's round bilge, tunnel stern, and greater glass
        > area would be the most time consuming.
        > I sure could use a more in depth comparison by somebody who has built
        > traditionally constructed boats before. I am a cabinetmaker and
        > funiture builder/restorer, but my boatbuilding experience so far has
        > been limited to sheet plywood. I'd be interested in any comments
        > regarding looks, practicality, ease of buiding, alternate building
        > methods, or any other aspects of these three boats (or suggetions of
        > other boats!)
        > Andrew Harvey
      • Lewis E. Gordon
        AD, Ouch! Your winter storage requirements may limit your construction method choices. Conventional plank on frame will certainly present a challenge to
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 6, 2004
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          AD,

          Ouch! Your winter storage requirements may limit your construction
          method choices. Conventional plank on frame will certainly present a
          challenge to prevent severe drying out over the winter. Are any of
          your choices lap strake construction? As much as I personally dislike
          the idea of cutting big pieces of wood into little strips just to put
          them back together again, strip planking a design based for plank on
          frame should not be too big a deal. Cold molding would be an expensive
          alternative.

          Lewis


          --- In AtkinBoats@yahoogroups.com, "adharvey2" <cen67858@c...> wrote:
          >
          > Forgot to mention - whatever I build will have to sit out the winter
          > on a trailer at 10 - 20 below zero and 10% relative humidity.
          >
        • adharvey2
          ... Thanks Lewis. I was figuring on using plywood planking. John Atkins made reference to the possibility of batten seam plywood planking in his article on the
          Message 4 of 5 , Oct 7, 2004
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            --- In AtkinBoats@yahoogroups.com, "Lewis E. Gordon"
            Thanks Lewis.
            I was figuring on using plywood planking. John Atkins made reference
            to the possibility of batten seam plywood planking in his article on
            the plans site. Or do you think plywood lapstrake woud be better? Btw,
            those climate parameters I mentioned are the extremes, not averages.
            I have sent for study plans for the boats in quetion. Should know more
            about construction when they arrive.
            Andrew

            <l_gordon_nica@y...> wrote:
            >
            >
            AD,
            >
            > Ouch! Your winter storage requirements may limit your construction
            > method choices. Conventional plank on frame will certainly present a
            > challenge to prevent severe drying out over the winter. Are any of
            > your choices lap strake construction? As much as I personally dislike
            > the idea of cutting big pieces of wood into little strips just to put
            > them back together again, strip planking a design based for plank on
            > frame should not be too big a deal. Cold molding would be an expensive
            > alternative.
            >
            > Lewis
            >
            >
            > --- In AtkinBoats@yahoogroups.com, "adharvey2" <cen67858@c...> wrote:
            > >
            > > Forgot to mention - whatever I build will have to sit out the winter
            > > on a trailer at 10 - 20 below zero and 10% relative humidity.
            > >
          • jkohnen@boat-links.com
            Sounds like you ve got a handle on trailer-friendly construction. Lapstrake might be just a tad lighter than batten-seam, but boats you re interested in aren t
            Message 5 of 5 , Oct 7, 2004
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              Sounds like you've got a handle on trailer-friendly construction. Lapstrake
              might be just a tad lighter than batten-seam, but boats you're interested in
              aren't lightweights, so that really doesn't matter. You won't want to be
              trailering them very much or very far! You can probably do the topsides of
              Tang with sheet plywood. It'd be a good idea to avoid large chunks of wood
              in the backbone, especially if you use oak, since large pieces of wood will
              move quite a bit with moisture changes. I think I'd use something like 3M
              4200 (or 5200 in places where you _never_ want to take it back apart) and
              fasteners instead of epoxy in the plank seams, since it's more flexible, and
              there's plenty of framing to hold the boat together, unlike the lightweight
              boats designed to take advantage of epoxied planking.

              Little Water looks like she'd be pretty difficult to build, probably not a
              good choice for a first boat. Even Robb White had to stop and scratch his
              head lots of times when figuring out how to get the shape of the tunnel from
              the drawings to the boat when he was building his bastardized Rescue Minor!

              Speaking of first boats, maybe it'd be a good idea to build a smaller,
              cheaper, simpler and quicker to build boat first to get the hang of things.
              Something like Ike or June Bug, for example, since you'd be using the same
              construction methods and installing an inboard engine, just on a smaller
              scale.

              On Thu, 07 Oct 2004 15:40:35 -0000, Andrew wrote:
              > ...
              > I was figuring on using plywood planking. John Atkins made reference
              > to the possibility of batten seam plywood planking in his article on
              > the plans site. Or do you think plywood lapstrake woud be better? Btw,
              > those climate parameters I mentioned are the extremes, not averages.
              > I have sent for study plans for the boats in quetion. Should know more
              > about construction when they arrive.
              > Andrew

              --
              John <jkohnen@...>
              http://www.boat-links.com/
              Correlation does not imply causation; except, of course, to your cat.
              <Craig O'Donnell>
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