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Re: More BlackPearl_repairs

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  • cynon7
    I think you mentioned that you would be using epoxy and fiberglass... one trick I picked up from the wood/epoxy/fiberglass kayaks I built was the
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 11 9:08 AM
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      I think you mentioned that you would be using epoxy and fiberglass... one trick I picked up from the wood/epoxy/fiberglass kayaks I built was the "drill-fill-drill" method of fastening: drill an oversized hole, fill the hole with a mixture of epoxy thickened with wood flour and silica hardener, and then drill into the epoxy resin matrix for the screw. It's not as strong as screwing into the wood directly, but screwing into thickened epoxy is strong enough to hold trim in place; and then the wood is sealed at the threads to prevent water intrusion.


      --- In AtkinBoats@yahoogroups.com, Michael Metcalfe <mikmet@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi,
      > Forgot to mention that I'm also looking for ideas to prevent the deckhouse
      > rot problems. The trim moulding screws perforating the glass roof have
      > obviously given me some grief.
      > Please tell me she will look fine without it or that I can paint one on.
      > Cheers (with CPES).
      > Mike
      >
      > Check out my Picasa photo album
      > BlackPearl_repairs<https://picasaweb.google.com/108044486270473249389/BlackPearl_repairs>
      >
    • John Kohnen
      If you use a filler like glass fibers with your epoxy, and then use a machine screw, it ll be stronger than a wood screw driven into wood. I wouldn t be
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 29 9:37 PM
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        If you use a filler like glass fibers with your epoxy, and then use a
        machine screw, it'll be stronger than a wood screw driven into wood. I
        wouldn't be surprised if it's stronger even if you use wood flour for the
        filler.

        Speaking of machine screws... Somebody did some experiments with machine
        screws driven into wood -- no epoxy -- and found that they held better
        than wood screws or sheet metal screws! I've been using machine screws in
        the renovation of my little power cruiser (not an Atkin design, Karl
        Stambaugh's Redwing 18) when putting screws into plywood, thinking that a
        machine screw has full grip right to the tip, while a wood screw doesn't
        grip much with it's pointy tip, and I can't use a very long screw into
        plywood. I've found them easy to use, and they feel like they're gripping
        real good. Now I'm reluctant to use wood screws or sheet metal screws
        except in places I'm not worried about strength. <g>

        In plywood and Doug fir I don't need to tap the holes, the screw itself
        does that just fine. The pilot drill sizes I've been using are 1/8"
        (.125") for #8-32 and 5/32" (.156") for #10-24.

        On Mon, 11 Jul 2011 09:08:30 -0700, cynon7 wrote:

        >
        > I think you mentioned that you would be using epoxy and fiberglass...
        > one trick I picked up from the wood/epoxy/fiberglass kayaks I built was
        > the "drill-fill-drill" method of fastening: drill an oversized hole,
        > fill the hole with a mixture of epoxy thickened with wood flour and
        > silica hardener, and then drill into the epoxy resin matrix for the
        > screw. It's not as strong as screwing into the wood directly, but
        > screwing into thickened epoxy is strong enough to hold trim in place;
        > and then the wood is sealed at the threads to prevent water intrusion.

        --
        John (jkohnen@...)
        It s a damn poor mind that can think of only one way to spell a
        word! (Attributed to Andrew Jackson)
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