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RE: [AtkinBoats] Epoxy

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  • William E. Parker
    When I got my Florence Oakland I replaced the deadwood. To glue the deadwood I used WEST System with a small amount of colodial silica to thicken it. Opinions
    Message 1 of 17 , Mar 5, 2011
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      When I got my Florence Oakland I replaced the deadwood.  To glue the deadwood I used WEST System with a small amount of colodial silica to thicken it. Opinions differ on how to set the lead into the deadwood.  Some think the lead should be bonded with epoxy and the entire assembly coated with epoxy then fiberglassed using epoxy.  That is what I did.  Others think the joint between the lead and the deadwood should be an elastomeric substance, anything from silicone (very expensive in the quantity needed) to roofing tar.  If you talk to the WEST people about deadwood, they admit that even WEST system epoxy can only keep so much moisture out of a fin that is in the water all the time.  That is why I used epoxy for the joints as well as the fiberglass, and to bond the lead to the deadwood.  One thing that should be done as part of the project is to coat the keelbolt holes in the deadwood, red lead if going traditional, epoxy of not.  Remember, water gets in the bilge as rainwater or condensation, and finds its way to the lowest point.

       

      I have great respect for resorcinol, and it certainly does a great job on big structures.  I used it on my mast.  The problem isn’t simply the structure, but controlling moisture in the wood.  For now, I can see nothing better for that than epoxy.  One thing I didn’t know until after I made my keel structure is that stainless steel does not remain stainless if it isn’t exposed to the air.  Keelbolts should be bronze for this reason. 

       

      Best,

      Bill

       

      From: AtkinBoats@yahoogroups.com [mailto:AtkinBoats@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jerry
      Sent: Friday, March 04, 2011 9:07 PM
      To: AtkinBoats@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [AtkinBoats] Epoxy

       

       

      I am just getting started building the Florence Oakland.This is my first boat project and I need some recomendations for an Epoxy to use to bond the deadwood.So anybody know what sticks whiteoak really good?

    • JohnA
      ... I thought that resorcinol was more waterproof than epoxy? Also, I ve never heard of any issues with oak. Seems like the perfect solution for an oak
      Message 2 of 17 , Mar 5, 2011
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        > I have great respect for resorcinol, and it certainly does a great job on
        > big structures. I used it on my mast. The problem isn't simply the
        > structure, but controlling moisture in the wood. For now, I can see nothing
        > better for that than epoxy.

        I thought that resorcinol was more waterproof than epoxy? Also, I've never heard of any issues with oak. Seems like the perfect solution for an oak backbone.
      • William E. Parker
        Resorcinol is waterproof, no doubt about it. I was not worrying about the joint, just the question of rot. Oak probably will not rot; it will swell up and
        Message 3 of 17 , Mar 5, 2011
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          Resorcinol is waterproof, no doubt about it.  I was not worrying about the joint, just the question of rot.  Oak probably will not rot; it will swell up and dry out with the cycle of launching and pulling most of us in the North have to deal with.  If the boat is to be in the water continuously, and you have a good bottom paint, it probably isn’t a question.  I remember vividly looking at a folkboat that had been on its cradle over the winter in Michigan.  You could see through parts of the deadwood.  The owner saw me looking and said “Don’t worry, it’ll soak up.”  I have always worried.

           

           

          From: Jerry Miller [mailto:gonzochfeng@...]
          Sent: Saturday, March 05, 2011 9:23 AM
          To: wmeparker@...
          Subject: RE: [AtkinBoats] Epoxy

           

          Thanks for the advice.Seems like once you get started with a with this thing all kinds of conciderations pop up you didn't really think about before.I do plan on glassing the entire outside of the hull.

           For putting the lead to the deadwood I had thought about 3-M's marine sealant 5200.I don't know if you have ever used this product but it is some pretty nasty stuff.I worked for Gulfstar yachts in St. Petersburg Florida back in the early 80's.I was 0ne of two mechanics that installed the engines and propulsion systems in all thier motor yachts.We used the 5200 as a sealant more than a bonding agent between the stainless steel strut and the fiberglass hull.We misaligned a strut once and didn't catch it untill after the 5200 had set up.We tried everything to get that stuff loose.Finally we inserted a 10 ft. section of shaft material into the cutless bearing and twisted that thing off.It tore the fiberglass out of the hull but the bond between the strut and hull never broke.Man did we get in trouble for that.

           

        • Brandon F
          ... Hear, hear! Same applies to chain plates and everything else that goes through the deck. Galvanized steel works too and is a little easier to come by.
          Message 4 of 17 , Mar 5, 2011
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            --- In AtkinBoats@yahoogroups.com, "William E. Parker" <wmeparker@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            >
            >stainless steel does not remain stainless if it isn't
            > exposed to the air. Keelbolts should be bronze for this reason.
            >
            Hear, hear! Same applies to chain plates and everything else that goes through the deck.

            Galvanized steel works too and is a little easier to come by.

            Brandon
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