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Re: [AtkinBoats] Re: UnlikelyBoatBuilder: Lofting Board

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  • davy riggs
    Hi, John I definitely like your choice of the Vintage dinghy.   I doubt there s another boat in her class that will be as capable or as pretty.   Shouldn t
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 6, 2011
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      Hi, John

      I definitely like your choice of the Vintage dinghy.   I doubt there's another boat in her class that will be as capable or as pretty.   Shouldn't be a terribly hard job either.

      One alternative lofting arrangement is to make an "easel" and set the panels up  at an incline, tilting away from you at about a 15-degree angle.  I do this because it is too uncomfortable to work on my old knees.  The total height from baseline is just under three feet so, if that office chair in your photo is adjustable for height, you could do it totally sitting down.

      You'd need to lay the panel down flat for pattern-making after you've got it lofted, but you still save a lot of time on your knees.   Also, if you do it my way you have to tack a batten across the bottom of your lofting panels for the marking staves to butt up against.  But you really should do this anyway, as it makes your measurements a lot more accurate and repeatable.   And you may need a light-duty nailer for the fairing battens.

      Good luck and keep us posted!
      Dave


      Man proposes- God disposes. -U.S. Grant

      --- On Sat, 2/5/11, JohnA <jalmberg@...> wrote:

      From: JohnA <jalmberg@...>
      Subject: [AtkinBoats] Re: UnlikelyBoatBuilder: Lofting Board
      To: AtkinBoats@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Saturday, February 5, 2011, 1:21 PM

       



      --- In AtkinBoats@yahoogroups.com, Giuliano Girometta <ggboat1@...> wrote:
      >
      > To loft my 14,5 ft I put 4 saw horses, Laid two 2x4x16 on top of the saw horses, then laid down two 4x8x3/4 sheets of MDF on top of the 2x4's and added a few back pieces of scrap plywood underneath the butt joint between the two sheets of MDF. In this way the two sheets can not move and for small boats when you have enough space to loft is a dream to work at table level better than on the floor.

      I considered putting the lofting board up on saw horses, but because it JUST fits into the space I have, I'd have to crawl under it every time to work on the far side. On balance, I thought it was easier to buy a set of knee pads :-)

      -- John

    • JohnA
      Oh, she looks plenty hard enough for me :-) The easel idea is a good one. I ll have to save it for when my knees give out (elbow and shoulder are already
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 7, 2011
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        Oh, she looks plenty hard enough for me :-)

        The easel idea is a good one. I'll have to save it for when my knees give out (elbow and shoulder are already starting to complain.)

        I'm going to keep it simple for now and just use knee pads. It would take me 2 weeks to build an easel and unfortunately my schedule doesn't allow that.

        Wooden boat show, or bust!

        -- John

        --- In AtkinBoats@yahoogroups.com, davy riggs <titanicslim@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi, John
        > I definitely like your choice of the Vintage dinghy.   I doubt there's another boat in her class that will be as capable or as pretty.   Shouldn't be a terribly hard job either.
        > One alternative lofting arrangement is to make an "easel" and set the panels up  at an incline, tilting away from you at about a 15-degree angle.  I do this because it is too uncomfortable to work on my old knees.  The total height from baseline is just under three feet so, if that office chair in your photo is adjustable for height, you could do it totally sitting down.
        > You'd need to lay the panel down flat for pattern-making after you've got it lofted, but you still save a lot of time on your knees.   Also, if you do it my way you have to tack a batten across the bottom of your lofting panels for the marking staves to butt up against.  But you really should do this anyway, as it makes your measurements a lot more accurate and repeatable.   And you may need a light-duty nailer for the fairing battens.
        > Good luck and keep us posted!Dave
        >
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