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Re: Unlikely Boat Builder: The Essential Tools

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  • JohnA
    ... Wow... I never noticed Pocahontas before. That is a really nice little boat and perfect for the kind of dingy cruising that seems to be getting popular.
    Message 1 of 10 , Nov 6, 2009
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      > Not surprisingly, his next boat was a
      > Pocahontas, about the shippiest 12-footer ever designed...

      Wow... I never noticed Pocahontas before. That is a really nice little boat and perfect for the kind of 'dingy cruising' that seems to be getting popular.

      -- John
    • j_fouser
      ... George Buehler has a few . but I d have more faith in an Akin Design
      Message 2 of 10 , Nov 6, 2009
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        --- In AtkinBoats@yahoogroups.com, "JohnA" <jalmberg@...> wrote:
        >

        > Actually, I wish I could find an Atkin design that was:
        > - V-bottom
        > - about 30' long
        > - double-ended
        > - aft-hung rudder
        > - big bowsprit
        > - gaff rigged cutter
        >
        > That would be my ideal 'next boat'.
        >

        > -- John
        >

        George Buehler has a few . but I'd have more faith in an Akin Design
      • John Almberg
        ... Huh... you must have read my mind. I like Juna, but would prefer an Atkin design. I guess I could bend on the double-ended requirement, but I really prefer
        Message 3 of 10 , Nov 6, 2009
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          > > Actually, I wish I could find an Atkin design that was:
          > > - V-bottom
          > > - about 30' long
          > > - double-ended
          > > - aft-hung rudder
          > > - big bowsprit
          > > - gaff rigged cutter
          > >
          > > That would be my ideal 'next boat'.
          > >
          >
          > > -- John
          > >
          >
          > George Buehler has a few . but I'd have more faith in an Akin Design

          Huh... you must have read my mind. I like Juna, but would prefer an
          Atkin design.

          I guess I could bend on the double-ended requirement, but I really
          prefer an aft-hung rudder. I've got a friend who just spent 2 years
          trying to fix his rudder after slamming it down on a rock and bending
          the shaft. Quite a pain to fix. Plus, eventually I'd like to try to
          build a self-steering system, and a trim-tab on an aft-hung rudder seems
          to be the simplest system.

          -- John


          --
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
          Check out my blog: http://unlikelyboatbuilder.com
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        • JohnA
          The other day, I realized I d been bitten. Not by a dinosaur, but by something just as powerful and a lot more sneaky: the boat building bug. I was building
          Message 4 of 10 , Nov 11, 2009
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            The other day, I realized I'd been bitten. Not by a dinosaur, but by something just as powerful and a lot more sneaky: the boat building bug.

            I was building the stongback for Cabin Boy -- a kind of ladder-frame structure that is used to erect the molds. Compared to lofting and building the molds, putting together the strongback was simple, even for me. Obviously I didn't say so at the time... no sense tempting fate.

            Nevertheless, while doing this pleasantly easy work, I had a few brainwaves left over and found myself day dreaming...

            Read complete blog post: I Am Bitten 

            Enjoy: John

          • JohnA
            Man, The Tool Maker There is nothing particularly difficult about sailing, my friend John V.
            Message 5 of 10 , Nov 17, 2009
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              Man, The Tool Maker

              "There is nothing particularly difficult about sailing," my friend John V. mused as we drove across Peconic Bay last weekend into a cold, 20 knot breeze. "But there are an enormous number of simple skills to be mastered."

              At that particular moment, I was trying to master the skill of staying warm under the dodger, while John squinted into the wind like the Ancient Mariner, seemingly unaffected by the ferocious wind-chill factor...


              Read the complete blog post in which I (amazingly) build my first tool...

              Man, The Tool Maker

              Enjoy: John
            • JohnA
              Some call them woodworking tricks , but I call them micro inventions -- simple, non-obvious inventions that some wood worker discovered hundreds or maybe
              Message 6 of 10 , Nov 21, 2009
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                Some call them woodworking 'tricks', but I call them micro inventions -- simple, non-obvious inventions that some wood worker discovered hundreds or maybe thousands of years ago -- that are passed down from worker to worker because they are so darn useful...

                Complete blog post: Micro Inventions 
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