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What you get when you build a boat

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  • JohnA
    Whilst on my poor knees the other day, drilling away on the subject of a future blog post, it occurred to me that -- despite the sore knees and aching back --
    Message 1 of 10 , Nov 2, 2009
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      Whilst on my poor knees the other day, drilling away on the subject of a future blog post, it occurred to me that -- despite the sore knees and aching back -- building this boat was the most fun I'd had in years. And I wondered why, why it was so much fun?

      It surely isn't the boat itself, or the future of rowing and sailing it promises. If I'm honest, I don't particularly need a small boat to go sailing. I did plenty of sailing this summer on other people's boats.

      No, it's not the destination of completing the boat, so much as the journey of building it. It's the thrill of the possibility. The high of anticipation. The first date with a band saw. That's what makes building boats so much fun for me.

      New blog post:

      http://www.unlikelyboatbuilder.com/2009/11/what-you-get-when-you-build-boat.html

      -- John

      http://unlikelyboatbuilder.com
    • JohnA
      For about 54 years, I was an unhandy guy. There was nothing I could do about it, it wasn t my fault, it was just the way my genes were wired. So, while Helena
      Message 2 of 10 , Nov 5, 2009
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        For about 54 years, I was an unhandy guy. There was nothing I could do about it, it wasn't my fault, it was just the way my genes were wired.

        So, while Helena could spend a pleasant afternoon refinishing our 100 year old iron windows -- scraping away rust, cutting glass to replace broken panes, and carefully puttying them in place -- my jobs were exercises in frustrating futility.

        Read complete blog post:

        http://www.unlikelyboatbuilder.com/2009/11/key-boatbuilding-skill.html
      • John Kohnen
        I ve really been enjoying your Blog, John. I hope when you finish the Cabin Boy you ll keep building Atkin boats. Have you seen Clem Kuhlig s book on
        Message 3 of 10 , Nov 5, 2009
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          I've really been enjoying your Blog, John. I hope when you finish the
          Cabin Boy you'll keep building Atkin boats. <g>

          Have you seen Clem Kuhlig's book on building Cabin Boy? He really went
          overboard trying to make the fanciest little skiff ever made -- and taking
          the longest time to build one. <g> Not surprisingly, his next boat was a
          Pocahontas, about the shippiest 12-footer ever designed... An interesting
          book anyway...

          http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0877420645/themotherofal-20

          On Thu, 05 Nov 2009 07:34:21 -0800, John A wrote:

          > For about 54 years, I was an unhandy guy. There was nothing I could do
          > about it, it wasn't my fault, it was just the way my genes were wired.
          >
          > So, while Helena could spend a pleasant afternoon refinishing our 100
          > year old iron windows -- scraping away rust, cutting glass to replace
          > broken panes, and carefully puttying them in place -- my jobs were
          > exercises in frustrating futility.
          >
          > Read complete blog post:
          >
          > http://www.unlikelyboatbuilder.com/2009/11/key-boatbuilding-skill.html

          --
          John <jkohnen@...>
          The problem with people who have no vices is that generally you
          can be pretty sure they're going to have some pretty annoying
          virtues. <Elizabeth Taylor>
        • JohnA
          ... I m already thinking about the next one... Haven t decided to do the sensible thing and build a flat-bottom boat, like Shore Liner or Great Bear, or a
          Message 4 of 10 , Nov 6, 2009
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            > I've really been enjoying your Blog, John. I hope when you finish the
            > Cabin Boy you'll keep building Atkin boats. <g>

            I'm already thinking about the next one... Haven't decided to do the sensible thing and build a flat-bottom boat, like Shore Liner or Great Bear, or a V-bottom like Little Maid of Kent.

            Actually, I wish I could find an Atkin design that was:
            - V-bottom
            - about 30' long
            - double-ended
            - aft-hung rudder
            - big bowsprit
            - gaff rigged cutter

            That would be my ideal 'next boat'.

            > Have you seen Clem Kuhlig's book on building Cabin Boy? He really went
            > overboard trying to make the fanciest little skiff ever made -- and taking
            > the longest time to build one. <g> Not surprisingly, his next boat was a
            > Pocahontas, about the shippiest 12-footer ever designed... An interesting
            > book anyway...

            I have it, along with all the other 'standard' boat building books. It's one of the reasons I chose Cabin Boy, but as I go along, I'm getting the idea that Clem liked to do things the hard way :-)

            I'm thinking more 'work boat' finish for mine... will probably finish the inside planking with linseed oil (I like that look), and I'm already prowling the woods, looking for a pine/spruce/fir tree that is just about the right size for the mast. I have a few candidates already... just waiting for winter to get the sap out, then it's for the chop :-)

            -- John
          • JohnA
            ... Wow... I never noticed Pocahontas before. That is a really nice little boat and perfect for the kind of dingy cruising that seems to be getting popular.
            Message 5 of 10 , Nov 6, 2009
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              > Not surprisingly, his next boat was a
              > Pocahontas, about the shippiest 12-footer ever designed...

              Wow... I never noticed Pocahontas before. That is a really nice little boat and perfect for the kind of 'dingy cruising' that seems to be getting popular.

              -- John
            • j_fouser
              ... George Buehler has a few . but I d have more faith in an Akin Design
              Message 6 of 10 , Nov 6, 2009
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                --- In AtkinBoats@yahoogroups.com, "JohnA" <jalmberg@...> wrote:
                >

                > Actually, I wish I could find an Atkin design that was:
                > - V-bottom
                > - about 30' long
                > - double-ended
                > - aft-hung rudder
                > - big bowsprit
                > - gaff rigged cutter
                >
                > That would be my ideal 'next boat'.
                >

                > -- John
                >

                George Buehler has a few . but I'd have more faith in an Akin Design
              • John Almberg
                ... Huh... you must have read my mind. I like Juna, but would prefer an Atkin design. I guess I could bend on the double-ended requirement, but I really prefer
                Message 7 of 10 , Nov 6, 2009
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                  > > Actually, I wish I could find an Atkin design that was:
                  > > - V-bottom
                  > > - about 30' long
                  > > - double-ended
                  > > - aft-hung rudder
                  > > - big bowsprit
                  > > - gaff rigged cutter
                  > >
                  > > That would be my ideal 'next boat'.
                  > >
                  >
                  > > -- John
                  > >
                  >
                  > George Buehler has a few . but I'd have more faith in an Akin Design

                  Huh... you must have read my mind. I like Juna, but would prefer an
                  Atkin design.

                  I guess I could bend on the double-ended requirement, but I really
                  prefer an aft-hung rudder. I've got a friend who just spent 2 years
                  trying to fix his rudder after slamming it down on a rock and bending
                  the shaft. Quite a pain to fix. Plus, eventually I'd like to try to
                  build a self-steering system, and a trim-tab on an aft-hung rudder seems
                  to be the simplest system.

                  -- John


                  --
                  ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                  Check out my blog: http://unlikelyboatbuilder.com
                  ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                • JohnA
                  The other day, I realized I d been bitten. Not by a dinosaur, but by something just as powerful and a lot more sneaky: the boat building bug. I was building
                  Message 8 of 10 , Nov 11, 2009
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                    The other day, I realized I'd been bitten. Not by a dinosaur, but by something just as powerful and a lot more sneaky: the boat building bug.

                    I was building the stongback for Cabin Boy -- a kind of ladder-frame structure that is used to erect the molds. Compared to lofting and building the molds, putting together the strongback was simple, even for me. Obviously I didn't say so at the time... no sense tempting fate.

                    Nevertheless, while doing this pleasantly easy work, I had a few brainwaves left over and found myself day dreaming...

                    Read complete blog post: I Am Bitten 

                    Enjoy: John

                  • JohnA
                    Man, The Tool Maker There is nothing particularly difficult about sailing, my friend John V.
                    Message 9 of 10 , Nov 17, 2009
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                      Man, The Tool Maker

                      "There is nothing particularly difficult about sailing," my friend John V. mused as we drove across Peconic Bay last weekend into a cold, 20 knot breeze. "But there are an enormous number of simple skills to be mastered."

                      At that particular moment, I was trying to master the skill of staying warm under the dodger, while John squinted into the wind like the Ancient Mariner, seemingly unaffected by the ferocious wind-chill factor...


                      Read the complete blog post in which I (amazingly) build my first tool...

                      Man, The Tool Maker

                      Enjoy: John
                    • JohnA
                      Some call them woodworking tricks , but I call them micro inventions -- simple, non-obvious inventions that some wood worker discovered hundreds or maybe
                      Message 10 of 10 , Nov 21, 2009
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                        Some call them woodworking 'tricks', but I call them micro inventions -- simple, non-obvious inventions that some wood worker discovered hundreds or maybe thousands of years ago -- that are passed down from worker to worker because they are so darn useful...

                        Complete blog post: Micro Inventions 
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