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Re: Eric (the elder?)

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  • roninpnw
    John, Yes, I m building the Jordan Baby Tender (as in #1 in lapstrake, as opposed to #2). At the slow rate of progress, half of me wishes I were building a
    Message 1 of 8 , Jun 24, 2004
      John,

      Yes, I'm building the Jordan "Baby Tender" (as in #1 in lapstrake, as
      opposed to #2). At the slow rate of progress, half of me wishes I
      were building a real-life boat, but it's a good amount of practice as
      well. At present I've got three strakes fastened, and the deadline
      is August 1! (shh... it's a surprise)

      I assume you've got "footlose"? What do you think of her?

      I could go anywhere in Ronin, but I could never get ashore until I
      have a tender!!!

      -Scott

      --- In AtkinBoats@yahoogroups.com, jkohnen@b... wrote:
      > That's a beautiful boat Scott! You could go anywhere in the world
      in her.
      >
      > What design are you using for your "baby tender"? The designer of
      my sailing
      > skiff, Warren Jordan, also sells plans for baby tenders.
      >
      > On Fri, 11 Jun 2004 20:56:00 -0000, Scott wrote:
      > > I haven't been back here for a while since I posted regarding
      tenders
      > > back in May. Thanks for the feedback; I'm open to more! That
      > > project got pushed back for a nice reason: I'm building a
      > > lapstrake "Baby Tender" for my brother's upcoming baby.
      > > ...
      > > As far as the Eric itself, thanks for the interest! I just
      posted a
      > > few photos on this group site, in the folder "Eric Ketch." We
      > > haven't had her all too long, only about four months. "Ronin" was
      > > built in Nagoya, Japan, in 1966, with two sisterships (a broker
      re-
      > > creating the original trio of Faith, Hope, and Charity, the first
      > > buildings of the Eric ketch. She's mohagany on oak, spruce spars,
      > > lots of bronze... stout, solid, and sexy. We brought her up from
      > > Santa Cruz last March. With one owner for the past 30 years,
      I've a
      > > lot to live up to, and I'm keeping busy but I couldn't be happier!
      > > ...
      >
      > --
      > John <jkohnen@b...>
      > http://www.boat-links.com/
      > Eels are said to kelter in the water when they wamble.
    • jkohnen@boat-links.com
      One of our local messabouters built a Jordan baby tender a while back, it turned out real nice:
      Message 2 of 8 , Jun 29, 2004
        One of our local messabouters built a Jordan baby tender a while back, it
        turned out real nice:

        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MessaboutW/files/MembersBoats/ChrisKern/

        Unfortunately, you've got to join the group to see the pictures, but you can
        quit right afterwards, if you don't find our doings interesting...

        My Footloose suits me very well at this stage of my life. She's stable,
        comfortable, shallow draft, easy to rig and launch, good looking and good
        sailing (except in light airs, and of course she doesn't keep up with the
        high-strung modern boats to windward). Being a fat flat-bottomed skiff, she
        can be uncomfortable in a chop, especially motorboat wakes when the breeze
        is light. A week ago on the Columbia near Vancouver I got caught in some
        _vicious_ motorboat wakes that actually gave me a scare! There are some real
        pigs of motorboats out there, aren't there? Too bad everybody doesn't drive
        an Atkin boat! <g> The tugs and their tows and the ships weren't bad, it was
        the motorboats that made the steep, short wakes. :o( But in general the
        Footloose is pretty seaworthy for a skiff. Warren Jordan designed the boat
        for the lakes and bays at the Oregon coast, where it's usually windy, and it
        takes a fair amount of breeze before she feels overpressed.

        Handy Andy, or if you think you've got the space Vintage, are the tenders
        that would look best with your Eric. You could build the canvas-covered
        Handy Andy lapstrake like Vintage, or do Vintage canvas-covered, if you felt
        like it, using the building instructions for one for the other...

        On Thu, 24 Jun 2004 20:25:21 -0000, Scott wrote:
        > John,
        >
        > Yes, I'm building the Jordan "Baby Tender" (as in #1 in lapstrake, as
        > opposed to #2). At the slow rate of progress, half of me wishes I
        > were building a real-life boat, but it's a good amount of practice as
        > well. At present I've got three strakes fastened, and the deadline
        > is August 1! (shh... it's a surprise)
        >
        > I assume you've got "footlose"? What do you think of her?
        >
        > I could go anywhere in Ronin, but I could never get ashore until I
        > have a tender!!!

        --
        John <jkohnen@...>
        http://www.boat-links.com/
        One must have a heart of stone to read the death of Little Nell by
        Dickens without laughing. <Oscar Wilde>
      • roninpnw
        John, Those are very nice little boats. I especially love the sweeping shear on Handy Andy, it d look great bobbing behind Ronin (I wonder if she d need to
        Message 3 of 8 , Jun 30, 2004
          John,

          Those are very nice little boats. I especially love the sweeping
          shear on Handy Andy, it'd look great bobbing behind Ronin (I wonder
          if she'd need to have the mast moved to fit a spritsail... I'd like
          to store shorter spars). One of my main concerns in any tender would
          be that it's beachable. And I don't mean velvety sand, I mean
          wherever I may end up (in Puget Sound for now, which is varied and
          nasty enough). I fear canvas would take a licking... I have a bit of
          trepidation changing building plans, since I'm rather new at this.
          One thought I had, simply with a flat-bottom boat, which I've seen
          done quite regularly, is to encase the floor and chines in
          fiberglass. Now that I think about it, that would be feasible with a
          canvas boat, but would lose that canvas texture up close. And it's
          blasphemous, I know, but what am I to do?

          --- In AtkinBoats@yahoogroups.com, jkohnen@b... wrote:
          > One of our local messabouters built a Jordan baby tender a while
          back, it
          > turned out real nice:
          >
          >
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MessaboutW/files/MembersBoats/ChrisKern/
          >
          > Unfortunately, you've got to join the group to see the pictures,
          but you can
          > quit right afterwards, if you don't find our doings interesting...
          >
          > My Footloose suits me very well at this stage of my life. She's
          stable,
          > comfortable, shallow draft, easy to rig and launch, good looking
          and good
          > sailing (except in light airs, and of course she doesn't keep up
          with the
          > high-strung modern boats to windward). Being a fat flat-bottomed
          skiff, she
          > can be uncomfortable in a chop, especially motorboat wakes when the
          breeze
          > is light. A week ago on the Columbia near Vancouver I got caught in
          some
          > _vicious_ motorboat wakes that actually gave me a scare! There are
          some real
          > pigs of motorboats out there, aren't there? Too bad everybody
          doesn't drive
          > an Atkin boat! <g> The tugs and their tows and the ships weren't
          bad, it was
          > the motorboats that made the steep, short wakes. :o( But in general
          the
          > Footloose is pretty seaworthy for a skiff. Warren Jordan designed
          the boat
          > for the lakes and bays at the Oregon coast, where it's usually
          windy, and it
          > takes a fair amount of breeze before she feels overpressed.
          >
          > Handy Andy, or if you think you've got the space Vintage, are the
          tenders
          > that would look best with your Eric. You could build the canvas-
          covered
          > Handy Andy lapstrake like Vintage, or do Vintage canvas-covered, if
          you felt
          > like it, using the building instructions for one for the other...
          >
          > On Thu, 24 Jun 2004 20:25:21 -0000, Scott wrote:
          > > John,
          > >
          > > Yes, I'm building the Jordan "Baby Tender" (as in #1 in
          lapstrake, as
          > > opposed to #2). At the slow rate of progress, half of me wishes I
          > > were building a real-life boat, but it's a good amount of
          practice as
          > > well. At present I've got three strakes fastened, and the
          deadline
          > > is August 1! (shh... it's a surprise)
          > >
          > > I assume you've got "footlose"? What do you think of her?
          > >
          > > I could go anywhere in Ronin, but I could never get ashore until I
          > > have a tender!!!
          >
          > --
          > John <jkohnen@b...>
          > http://www.boat-links.com/
          > One must have a heart of stone to read the death of Little Nell
          by
          > Dickens without laughing. <Oscar Wilde>
        • jkohnen@boat-links.com
          I don t think you d have to move Handy Andy s mast to fit a spritsail. Where would you move it to anyway? It s already right up in the eyes of the boat. What
          Message 4 of 8 , Jul 4 1:26 AM
            I don't think you'd have to move Handy Andy's mast to fit a spritsail. Where
            would you move it to anyway? It's already right up in the eyes of the boat.
            What you might have to do is reduce the rake of the mast, maybe even raking
            it forward a tad. You want the center of effort of the spritsail to be close
            to where the CE of the jib-headed sail was. Figuring that out isn't
            difficult, the CE of the jib-headed sail is shown on the Handy Andy plans,
            and Jim Michalak tells how to figure the CE of the spritsail (and much else
            of use to balancing the rig of a small, shallow boat) in a recent
            newsletter:

            http://homepages.apci.net/~michalak/15jun04.htm

            The old canoe nuts foam at the mouth when they hear of somebody
            fiberglassing an old wood and canvas canoe (and I don't blame them!), but it
            might not be a bad idea for a new Handy Andy. You wouldn't be desecrating
            the work of a classic craftsman, after all. The thin, soft cedar planks
            under the 'glass probably wouldn't move enough to cause any harm, which is
            the usual problem with fiberglassing planked boats. BTW, when done properly,
            a canvas-covered boat or canoe doesn't show any canvas texture, the weave is
            supposed to be all full of filler. The finish should be smooth as a baby's
            bottom. <g>

            The planking of a canvas-covered boat doesn't need to fit tightly, and you
            don't need to taper and shape the planks, making the construction a bit
            easier for a tyro. Nowadays, somebody could strip-plank Handy Andy, glass
            her inside and out, and get away with no (or few) frames like a stripper
            canoe. Or cold-mold her. But don't let Mrs. Atkin know I'm talking about
            things like that. She hates it when people depart from the plans! <g> If I
            was going to build Handy Andy I'd do it lapstrake, with plywood planks glued
            at the laps, using the Vintage plans for a guide. For landing on rocky
            beaches I'd put hardwood strips along the edges of the lower laps. The
            planks can also be individually fiberglassed before installation.

            On Wed, 30 Jun 2004 15:55:22 -0000, Scott wrote:
            > Those are very nice little boats. I especially love the sweeping
            > shear on Handy Andy, it'd look great bobbing behind Ronin (I wonder
            > if she'd need to have the mast moved to fit a spritsail... I'd like
            > to store shorter spars). One of my main concerns in any tender would
            > be that it's beachable. And I don't mean velvety sand, I mean
            > wherever I may end up (in Puget Sound for now, which is varied and
            > nasty enough). I fear canvas would take a licking... I have a bit of
            > trepidation changing building plans, since I'm rather new at this.
            > One thought I had, simply with a flat-bottom boat, which I've seen
            > done quite regularly, is to encase the floor and chines in
            > fiberglass. Now that I think about it, that would be feasible with a
            > canvas boat, but would lose that canvas texture up close. And it's
            > blasphemous, I know, but what am I to do?

            --
            John <jkohnen@...>
            http://www.boat-links.com/
            I care not for a man's religion whose dog or cat are not the better for it.
            <Abraham Lincoln>
          • roninpnw
            I ve been away a little while... mostly covered in sawdust or varnish for the past couple of months. Anyhow, I finished up the project of the moment and
            Message 5 of 8 , Aug 30, 2004
              I've been away a little while... mostly covered in sawdust or varnish
              for the past couple of months. Anyhow, I finished up the 'project of
              the moment' and thought I'd let ya'll know since it was discussed
              over here!

              http://media5.hypernet.com/ubb/ultimatebb.php?
              ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=010132

              Now I can start the winter project... Ronin's actual tender!

              -Scott

              --- In AtkinBoats@yahoogroups.com, jkohnen@b... wrote:
              > One of our local messabouters built a Jordan baby tender a while
              back, it
              > turned out real nice:
              >
              >
              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MessaboutW/files/MembersBoats/ChrisKern/
              >
              > Unfortunately, you've got to join the group to see the pictures,
              but you can
              > quit right afterwards, if you don't find our doings interesting...
              >
              > My Footloose suits me very well at this stage of my life. She's
              stable,
              > comfortable, shallow draft, easy to rig and launch, good looking
              and good
              > sailing (except in light airs, and of course she doesn't keep up
              with the
              > high-strung modern boats to windward). Being a fat flat-bottomed
              skiff, she
              > can be uncomfortable in a chop, especially motorboat wakes when the
              breeze
              > is light. A week ago on the Columbia near Vancouver I got caught in
              some
              > _vicious_ motorboat wakes that actually gave me a scare! There are
              some real
              > pigs of motorboats out there, aren't there? Too bad everybody
              doesn't drive
              > an Atkin boat! <g> The tugs and their tows and the ships weren't
              bad, it was
              > the motorboats that made the steep, short wakes. :o( But in general
              the
              > Footloose is pretty seaworthy for a skiff. Warren Jordan designed
              the boat
              > for the lakes and bays at the Oregon coast, where it's usually
              windy, and it
              > takes a fair amount of breeze before she feels overpressed.
              >
              > Handy Andy, or if you think you've got the space Vintage, are the
              tenders
              > that would look best with your Eric. You could build the canvas-
              covered
              > Handy Andy lapstrake like Vintage, or do Vintage canvas-covered, if
              you felt
              > like it, using the building instructions for one for the other...
              >
              > On Thu, 24 Jun 2004 20:25:21 -0000, Scott wrote:
              > > John,
              > >
              > > Yes, I'm building the Jordan "Baby Tender" (as in #1 in
              lapstrake, as
              > > opposed to #2). At the slow rate of progress, half of me wishes I
              > > were building a real-life boat, but it's a good amount of
              practice as
              > > well. At present I've got three strakes fastened, and the
              deadline
              > > is August 1! (shh... it's a surprise)
              > >
              > > I assume you've got "footlose"? What do you think of her?
              > >
              > > I could go anywhere in Ronin, but I could never get ashore until I
              > > have a tender!!!
              >
              > --
              > John <jkohnen@b...>
              > http://www.boat-links.com/
              > One must have a heart of stone to read the death of Little Nell
              by
              > Dickens without laughing. <Oscar Wilde>
            • jkohnen@boat-links.com
              The baby tender is beautiful Scott! If you can stuff like that you won t have any trouble building a Handy Andy or Vintage. ... -- John
              Message 6 of 8 , Sep 1, 2004
                The baby tender is beautiful Scott! If you can stuff like that you won't
                have any trouble building a Handy Andy or Vintage. <g>

                On Mon, 30 Aug 2004 23:22:20 -0000, Scott wrote:
                > I've been away a little while... mostly covered in sawdust or varnish
                > for the past couple of months. Anyhow, I finished up the 'project of
                > the moment' and thought I'd let ya'll know since it was discussed
                > over here!
                >
                > http://media5.hypernet.com/ubb/ultimatebb.php?
                > ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=010132
                >
                > Now I can start the winter project... Ronin's actual tender!

                --
                John <jkohnen@...>
                http://www.boat-links.com/
                Show me a man who has enjoyed his school days and I'll show you a
                bully and a bore. <Robert Morley>
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