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Another Atkin tunnel stern

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  • John Cooper
    I also talked with Pat Atkin at the WoodenBoat show and bought a set of plans for the 20 foot round-bilge Everhope. I had a brief ride on the Mystic River in
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 1, 2009
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      I also talked with Pat Atkin at the WoodenBoat show and bought a set of plans for the 20 foot round-bilge Everhope.

      I had a brief ride on the Mystic River in Timm Schleiff's Rescue Minor (and also in Ninigret thanks to its helpful owner) but need more freeboard than RM offers. Everhope doesn't have the extreme shallow draft of RM, but 12 inches is considerably less than my 18' Chris-Craft sea skiff draws.

      Coincidentally, William Atkin's speed forecast of up to 21 mph for Everhope with 45 hp is about the highest of any of the Atkin tunnel-stern designs. In 1957 Chris-Craft claimed 30 mph top speed for the sea skiff with its original 95 hp engine, but my GPS shows 24 mph flat out; maybe the water's become thicker over the years. For Everhope to get 21 mph with less than half the horsepower would be amazing. I'd be looking at a 38 hp Beta diesel (1500 cc, 91 cubic inch) with a 1.5:1 gear and any anywhere upwards of 18 mph would be pretty good for that amount of power.

      Does anyone have first-hand knowledge about the performance of the Everhope design?

      John
    • calfee20
      ... I don t have any personal knowledge on the everhope but I would like to make an observation about the draft of these boats. Timm Schleiff s Rescue Minor
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 3, 2009
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        --- In AtkinBoats@yahoogroups.com, "John Cooper" <john5cooper@...> wrote:
        >
        > I also talked with Pat Atkin at the WoodenBoat show and bought a set of plans for the 20 foot round-bilge Everhope.
        >
        > I had a brief ride on the Mystic River in Timm Schleiff's Rescue Minor (and also in Ninigret thanks to its helpful owner) but need more freeboard than RM offers. Everhope doesn't have the extreme shallow draft of RM, but 12 inches is considerably less than my 18' Chris-Craft sea skiff draws.
        >
        > Coincidentally, William Atkin's speed forecast of up to 21 mph for Everhope with 45 hp is about the highest of any of the Atkin tunnel-stern designs. In 1957 Chris-Craft claimed 30 mph top speed for the sea skiff with its original 95 hp engine, but my GPS shows 24 mph flat out; maybe the water's become thicker over the years. For Everhope to get 21 mph with less than half the horsepower would be amazing. I'd be looking at a 38 hp Beta diesel (1500 cc, 91 cubic inch) with a 1.5:1 gear and any anywhere upwards of 18 mph would be pretty good for that amount of power.
        >
        > Does anyone have first-hand knowledge about the performance of the Everhope design?
        >
        > John
        >


        I don't have any personal knowledge on the everhope but I would like to make an observation about the draft of these boats.

        Timm Schleiff's Rescue Minor was built to plan but he has an 8" draft 2 inches more than Atkin and he told me that the people building them were getting similar results. I think that maybe the reason for this was that in the original plans there was no fiber glass, so these new boats are probably heavier.

        I know Robb White made his own version but he made it light and he had to add or move ballast around if he was lightly loaded to prevent cavitation. I am not saying the boats should be made weaker but perhaps once you are above the waterline lighter construction methods could be used.

        In the photos of Rescue Minor on Atkin's site and here there are several examples that range from Aluminum to plywood to strips and plywood and glass over a foam core. Maybe we could get some input from these people about their boats and if they are some insight on performance. I would like to talk to the man who used fiber glass over foam........................Tom C
      • windmill4048
        ... I have considerable operating experience with a Rescue Minor. It is a very small boat with respect to internal volume. Yes, it has low freeboard but good
        Message 3 of 4 , Jul 11, 2009
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          --- In AtkinBoats@yahoogroups.com, "calfee20" <calfee20@...> wrote:
          >
          > --- In AtkinBoats@yahoogroups.com, "John Cooper" <john5cooper@> wrote:
          > >
          > > I also talked with Pat Atkin at the WoodenBoat show and bought a set of plans for the 20 foot round-bilge Everhope.
          > >
          > > I had a brief ride on the Mystic River in Timm Schleiff's Rescue Minor (and also in Ninigret thanks to its helpful owner) but need more freeboard than RM offers. Everhope doesn't have the extreme shallow draft of RM, but 12 inches is considerably less than my 18' Chris-Craft sea skiff draws.
          > >
          > > Coincidentally, William Atkin's speed forecast of up to 21 mph for Everhope with 45 hp is about the highest of any of the Atkin tunnel-stern designs. In 1957 Chris-Craft claimed 30 mph top speed for the sea skiff with its original 95 hp engine, but my GPS shows 24 mph flat out; maybe the water's become thicker over the years. For Everhope to get 21 mph with less than half the horsepower would be amazing. I'd be looking at a 38 hp Beta diesel (1500 cc, 91 cubic inch) with a 1.5:1 gear and any anywhere upwards of 18 mph would be pretty good for that amount of power.
          > >
          > > Does anyone have first-hand knowledge about the performance of the Everhope design?
          > >
          > > John
          > >
          >
          >
          > I don't have any personal knowledge on the everhope but I would like to make an observation about the draft of these boats.
          >
          > Timm Schleiff's Rescue Minor was built to plan but he has an 8" draft 2 inches more than Atkin and he told me that the people building them were getting similar results. I think that maybe the reason for this was that in the original plans there was no fiber glass, so these new boats are probably heavier.
          >
          > I know Robb White made his own version but he made it light and he had to add or move ballast around if he was lightly loaded to prevent cavitation. I am not saying the boats should be made weaker but perhaps once you are above the waterline lighter construction methods could be used.
          >
          > In the photos of Rescue Minor on Atkin's site and here there are several examples that range from Aluminum to plywood to strips and plywood and glass over a foam core. Maybe we could get some input from these people about their boats and if they are some insight on performance. I would like to talk to the man who used fiber glass over foam........................Tom C
          >

          I have considerable operating experience with a Rescue Minor. It is a very small boat with respect to internal volume. Yes, it has low freeboard but good bouncy and stays dry also. I've never been uncomfortable in the boat.

          I would build an Everhope if I were doing it again. I believe there is a lot more useable boat in that design. If it were built very light with modern strip building methods I believe the draft and performance would be very close to a good Rescue Minor.

          By the way, White actually built his boat's hull shape much closer to Everhope that to Rescue Minor.
        • John Cooper
          Thanks for your input on this question. Every bit of information helps, and I hear the message about light weight loud and clear. My plan is to build with
          Message 4 of 4 , Jul 13, 2009
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            Thanks for your input on this question. Every bit of information helps, and I hear the message about light weight loud and clear.

            My plan is to build with glued-lap plywood planking, 10 mm thickness below the waterline and 8 mm above, with fibreglass coating only on the box deadwood and maybe up onto the garboard to stiffen things. I think this would be as light as any other method and minimizes the use of glass, which I don't find much fun to work with.

            Deck arrangement would be according to the plans but with steering console at the rear of the engine box. With the engine, battery and maybe the fuel tank all located in the box keel the centre of gravity would be quite low and right amidships. Compare this with an outboard installation that has the weight of the powerhead two feet above the waterline and it should make for a very stable boat.

            Any comments welcome.

            John
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