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Re: Help me with some history on my boat!

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  • Felix Graham-Jones
    Perhaps the best source for an account of William Atkin s inspiration for Eric is to be found in his book Of Yachts And Men . Chapters 7 & 8 describe the
    Message 1 of 6 , Nov 19, 2008
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      Perhaps the best source for an account of William Atkin's inspiration
      for Eric is to be found in his book "Of Yachts And Men".
      Chapters 7 & 8 describe the origins of the idea of a double ender with
      lines derived from a Colin Archer redningskoite as found in E. Keble
      Chatterton's "Fore and Aft Craft". William Nutting, editor of Motor
      Boat magazine, and his friend Arthur Hildebrand started the project
      and made the first model. William Atkin then developed the plans and
      Richard Chute of Long Island built the first three of the design,
      named Faith, Hope and Charity. Faith was commisioned by Henry Bixby, a
      member of the Cruising Club of America.
      Atkin reported that 175 sets of the plans had been sold within three
      years of their appearance in Motor Boat...."and many more have since
      been sold".
      Norway, more than Denmark, appears to be the place where this idea has
      its roots, but like all great American mongrels, it draws strengths
      from many parts and emerges with its own distinctive character.

      --- In AtkinBoats@yahoogroups.com, Aquiles Rösner
      <aquiles.roesner@...> wrote:
      >
      > "Eric" 32' is a nice boat. I am building now the "Ingrid", a little
      > bigger, then Eric, 37', but very similar lines. A remarcable boock
      > about the double-ender is "Colin Archer and the seaworthy double-ender"
      > from John Leather. He wrote that William Nutting visited Scandinavia in
      > 1915 and saw pointed-stern sailing craft, including Colin Archer
      > designs. With his friend Arthur Hildebrand they study the lines of a 47'
      > auxiliary lifeboat an make a copy reduced to 32 '. Nutting and
      > Hildebrand aproached William Atkin in 1924 and that seems to be the
      > birth of "Eric" with refined lines.
      > If you want, I can make some reserches in Denmark.
      > Greetings
      > Aquiles Rösner
      > Germany
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Am Donnerstag, den 13.11.2008, 22:12 +0000 schrieb pcgaetani:
      > > I am the proud owner of a boat which I believe is designed along the
      > > same lines of the "Eric." I have been trying to get more information
      > > on this boat for the past 5 years and have hit some brick walls.
      > > Hopefully someone here might have a little tidbit or even be able to
      > > point me in some sort of direction. I guess you can call this a shot
      > > in the dark.
      > >
      > > The story I have been told and other pieces of information I have
      > > gathered is that she was built in Nakskov, Denmark in 1926 by a
      > > Richard Rassmussen at the Nakskov Wooden Ship Yard. She is 32 feet
      > > long, has a 9.5 foot beam, and 5.5 foot draft. Like "Eric" she was
      > > originally rigged as a gaff rigged ketch. Having been worked on
      > > extensively by a Danish shipwright, it is clear she was overly built
      > > and to classic high end Danish standards with the best quality iron
      > > spikes and rivets. Her lines however are almost identical to the Eric
      > > and I am curious which boat came first given the age of my boat. Did
      > > William Atkin ever make any tips to Denmark before drawing the designs
      > > for "Eric?" Did he consult any particular Danes before completing his
      > > lines?
      > >
      > > I was hoping someone might have some documents/information or just
      > > know some history pertaining to yachts built to "Eric's" design in
      > > Denmark during the early 1920's.
      > >
      > > Any information, contacts, old documents, etc you might have would be
      > > a tremendous help for me. Thanks! (I also would be happy to email
      > > pictures if people are really interested)
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
    • John Kohnen
      Although Eric was designed in the early 1920s she didn t appear in MoToR BoatinG until 1938. The big hurricane of that year destroyed Wm. Atkin s home, and he
      Message 2 of 6 , Nov 20, 2008
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        Although Eric was designed in the early 1920s she didn't appear in MoToR
        BoatinG until 1938. The big hurricane of that year destroyed Wm. Atkin's
        home, and he and the family had to swim for their lives! William had a
        contract to supply a design article every month for MoToR BoatinG, but
        with the hurricane and all he couldn't come up with a new design. So, he
        "dusted off" the Eric plans, which fortunately weren't kept at his house,
        and wrote an article to go with them. I think he did miss one month in the
        magazine anyway. IIRC (I've got a cat on my lap so I can't go to the
        bookshelf and check), the half model of Eric carved in the '20s floated
        away from the wreckage of the Atkin home and was returned to Wm. An
        inspiration, perhaps, for him to publish Eric as his first post-hurricane
        design article.

        On Wed, 19 Nov 2008 04:29:01 -0800, Felix G-J wrote:

        > Perhaps the best source for an account of William Atkin's inspiration
        > for Eric is to be found in his book "Of Yachts And Men".
        > Chapters 7 & 8 describe the origins of the idea of a double ender with
        > lines derived from a Colin Archer redningskoite as found in E. Keble
        > Chatterton's "Fore and Aft Craft". William Nutting, editor of Motor
        > Boat magazine, and his friend Arthur Hildebrand started the project
        > and made the first model. William Atkin then developed the plans and
        > Richard Chute of Long Island built the first three of the design,
        > named Faith, Hope and Charity. Faith was commisioned by Henry Bixby, a
        > member of the Cruising Club of America.
        > Atkin reported that 175 sets of the plans had been sold within three
        > years of their appearance in Motor Boat...."and many more have since
        > been sold".
        > ...

        --
        John <jkohnen@...>
        The infliction of cruelty with a good conscience is a delight to
        moralists-- that is why they invented Hell. <Bertrand Russell>
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