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Re:Howdy, Shipmates!

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  • Mike
    Davy Yes yes yes it s coming back to me now. The name of the Chapelle design was Waterman, as I remember it was a file bottom with no deadrise at the bow.I
    Message 1 of 33 , Sep 7, 2008
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      Davy
      Yes yes yes it's coming back to me now. The name of the Chapelle
      design was Waterman, as I remember it was a file bottom with no
      deadrise at the bow.I think 19 ft with an outboard well. It should be
      a cinch to build out of plywood.
      Mike
      --- In AtkinBoats@yahoogroups.com, davy riggs <titanicslim@...> wrote:
      >
      > One more thing...
      >
      > Do you remember anything about the Chapelle design?
      > What it was called or any specifics? I've got a stack
      > of his books in the other room...
      >
      > Davy
      >
      > --- davy riggs <titanicslim@...> wrote:
      >
      > > Mike
      > >
      > > Sorry to hear about your hurricane troubles. We,ve
      > > still got the remnants of Gustav falling on us and
      > > my
      > > corner of the Ozarks is 500 miles from the Gulf!
      > >
      > > I recently discovered Ninigret and like it a lot.
      > > It's not really what I'm looking for, however, since
      > > I
      > > want more of a cabin- as well as sails.
      > >
      > > Weston Farmer- I seem to remember a boat he called
      > > a
      > > "camp cruiser" or something like. Wish I could find
      > > another copy of My Old Boat Shop.
      > >
      > > Dave
      > >
      > > --- Mike <Mikieq@...> wrote:
      > >
      > > > Dave,
      > > > I'll be happy to whip something up in photos. It
      > > > may take a few
      > > > days, due to trop storm Hanna flooding my shop
      > > floor
      > > > but as soon as I
      > > > can squeegie out I'll post something for you. As
      > > far
      > > > as plywood
      > > > designs along the lines of Marthas Garden, Howard
      > > > Chaple had a design
      > > > of about 21 foot that can be built in ply. I'll
      > > have
      > > > to hunt up the
      > > > old National Fisherman artical on it for you. In
      > > > addition Weston
      > > > farmer has a couple of similar designs. Have you
      > > > looked at Ninigret
      > > > by Atkin? There's a 22 foot clasic look in
      > > plywood.
      > > > I may think of
      > > > some more designs but my senile mind is a little
      > > > foggier these days.
      > > > Mike
      > > > --- In AtkinBoats@yahoogroups.com, davy riggs
      > > > <titanicslim@> wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > Mike
      > > > >
      > > > > We were actually talking about my nickels but I,
      > > > for
      > > > > one, would be delighted to see a demonstration
      > > of
      > > > this
      > > > > "staving" process, for sure!
      > > > >
      > > > > It was my desire to build this design in
      > > plywood,
      > > > > since it will spend a good amount of its time on
      > > a
      > > > > trailer and the remainder in fresh water.
      > > > >
      > > > > I am not glued and screwed to this design, I
      > > just
      > > > > really like its looks and it happens to have all
      > > > the
      > > > > features (shallow draft, roomy cabin, small
      > > > sailing
      > > > > rig, pilot house etc.) That I'm looking for.
      > > If
      > > > I
      > > > > found a design for plywood that met all my
      > > > criteria
      > > > > I'd jump on it like Michael Jackson jumps on a
      > > > > 12-year-old. Bottle of Scotch, that is.
      > > > >
      > > > > Dave
      > > > >
      > > > > --- Mike <Mikieq@> wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > > Well Ken, since it's your nickle give it a
      > > whirl
      > > > but
      > > > > > I like to think
      > > > > > that Mr Atkin knew what he was doing, and
      > > since
      > > > you
      > > > > > thought enough of
      > > > > > his design to build the thing, why not build
      > > it
      > > > like
      > > > > > he drew it? In
      > > > > > other words the boat was designed to take
      > > > advantage
      > > > > > of the building
      > > > > > method and material. If you don't like the
      > > > method or
      > > > > > cannot get the
      > > > > > material then don't you think you would be
      > > > better
      > > > > > off finding a
      > > > > > design that was more in keeping with your
      > > style?
      > > > > > Chesapeake deadrise
      > > > > > boats are simple heavily built craft. Martha
      > > > Green
      > > > > > was drawn to yacht
      > > > > > scantlings but most working deadrise boats of
      > > > that
      > > > > > size will have an
      > > > > > 8x8 or 6x8 keelson and 1 1/8 to 1 1/4 side
      > > plank
      > > > and
      > > > > > 1 1/4 to 1 1/2
      > > > > > bottom plank. they don't do well when built
      > > > lightly.
      > > > > > Their weight is
      > > > > > part and parsil of thier seaworthyness. Heavy
      > > > > > ballast weights make
      > > > > > them too quick in motion and difficult to
      > > stand
      > > > in.
      > > > > > The staving at
      > > > > > the bow isn't difficult to do, each board is
      > > cut
      > > > > > much like an
      > > > > > airplane propeller and fitted into place. I
      > > > would be
      > > > > > happy to do a
      > > > > > short series of photographs showing how to cut
      > > > > > staving on a bandsaw
      > > > > > if there is any interest.
      > > > > > Mike
      > > > > > --- In AtkinBoats@yahoogroups.com, Kenneth
      > > Grome
      > > >
      > > > > > <bagacayboatworks@> wrote:
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > It looks easy enough to build to me, simply
      > > by
      > > > > > laminating
      > > > > > > several layers of thinner plywood in the
      > > tight
      > > > > > bend areas.
      > > > > > > This is how more than a few builders do it
      > > > when
      > > > > > they choose
      > > > > > > to use plywood instead of the specified
      > > > > > traditional
      > > > > > > materials.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > Sincerely,
      > > > > > > Ken Grome
      > > > > > > Bagacay Boatworks
      > > > > > > www.bagacayboatworks.com
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > I've built several deadrise boats and 3 or
      > > 4
      > > > > > skipjacks
      > > > > > > > and can say you will have a great deal of
      > > > > > trouble trying
      > > > > > > > to get plywood to lay correctly on Martha
      > > > Greens
      > > > > > > > forefoot. In addition, this type of bottom
      > > > needs
      > > > > > thick
      > > > > > > > planking for structual reasons. You would
      > > be
      > > > > > much better
      > > > > > > > off finding a design for plywood. You may
      > > be
      > > > > > able to do
      > > > > > > > this bottom with narrow strip plank in a
      > > > cross
      > > > > > plank
      > > > > > > > fashion useing 5200 for glue between the
      > > > strips
      > > > > > but I
      > > > > > > > would shy away from this boat if you have
      > > to
      > > > > > build in
      > > > > > > > ply.
      > > > > > > > Mike
      > > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > For every human problem there is a neat, simple
      > > > solution; and it is
      > > > always wrong. -H. L. Mencken
      > > > >
      > > >
      > >
      > === message truncated ===
      >
      >
      >
      > For every human problem there is a neat, simple solution; and it is
      always wrong. -H. L. Mencken
      >
    • Kenneth Grome
      Hi Dave, There are several tunnel-stern Seabright skiffs on the Atkin website. Most are on the inboard utilities pages. The tunnel-stern versions are
      Message 33 of 33 , Sep 9, 2008
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        Hi Dave,

        There are several "tunnel-stern Seabright skiffs" on the
        Atkin website. Most are on the 'inboard utilities' pages.

        The tunnel-stern versions are semi-displacement boats
        designed for very shallow water and top speeds of about
        15-17 mph. The most recent and therefore theoretically the
        best performing is Shoals Runner, not Rescue Minor.

        There are also several NON-tunnel-stern versions (my
        favorite at the moment is Sallie Hyde) ... so you'll have
        to be very careful when researching them to avoid getting
        these two lines mixed up.

        There's no need to deal with the complication of
        tunnel-stern construction if all you're after is
        displacement speeds. In this case you may be better off
        with a non-tunnel-stern Seabright skiff.

        Sincerely,
        Ken Grome
        Bagacay Boatworks
        www.bagacayboatworks.com






        > Whoa Nellie! How has this design escaped my
        > attention? Could be it's because I have never really
        > built motor boats, but this thing just blows me away!
        >
        > Is there an archive or someplace where I can get more
        > information on this design? Are there any other boats
        > using this hull form?
        >
        > Dave
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