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  • jhkohnen@boat-links.com
    William Billy Atkin and his son John designed boats for the better part of the 20th century. Good boats and sensible boats mostly; sailboats that can be
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 11, 2004
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      William "Billy" Atkin and his son John designed boats for the better part of
      the 20th century. Good boats and sensible boats mostly; sailboats that can
      be built without breaking the bank, but will give pleasure for years;
      motorboats that give good speed with modest power -- and modest wakes. The
      kind of boats that not only make their owners and passengers happy, but also
      brighten the day for others sharing the water with them. The world would be
      a better place with more Atkin boats on the water.

      Of the more than 900 designs produced by William and John Atkin, well over a
      third were intended for amateur construction and published in MoToR BoatinG
      magazine. One plan per month (with the exception of a few multi-part
      articles), every month, from the early 1920s to the late 1950s! The current
      catalog of Atkin plans, over 200 of them, consists mainly of designs first
      published in MoToR BoatinG. The designs date from a time when amateur
      boatbuilders were assumed to be handier than they're supposed to be now --
      these aren't instant boats -- but they're generally not complicated boats
      either, and many could be adapted to more modern construction techniques.

      Some time ago Pat Atkin, John's widow, approached me about putting together
      a Web page for the Atkin designs. After some hemming and hawing, I'm now
      working on the site, and have a fair part of the design catalog online. In
      time, I intend to add some biographical material and photos of boats built
      to Atkin plans:

      http://www.atkinboatplans.com/

      I've also got an incomplete index of the MoToR BoatinG Ideal Series, the
      bound collections of articles from the magazine:

      http://www.boat-links.com/Ideal/

      Most of the Atkin boats are just as good today as they were when designed. I
      hope this group, and the online catalog, will inspire the building of more
      good boats.

      BTW, that's Eric at the top of the group's Web page.

      --
      John <jkohnen@...>
      http://www.boat-links.com/
      One boat just leads to another.
      <John Kohnen>
    • liokai2002
      Hello, I´m new in this group and please excuse me talking of things you have read and discussed already several times. I found the site of Atkin & Co. at
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 28, 2004
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        Hello, I´m new in this group and please excuse me talking of things
        you have read and discussed already several times.
        I found the site of Atkin & Co. at DUCKWORKS and was stirred up by
        the TUNNEL - STERN designs, especially by Sand Piper a "Shoal Water
        Day Cruiser". What struck me most was the reverse - V tunnel stern.
        From tank tests at Duisburg University and a tank in Berlin I know
        that underwater shapes similiar to Sand Piper are hydrodynamically
        the most effective - not only in shallow waters. Boats with these
        shapes are faster, need less fuel an have more course stability in
        waves ( safer, RO-ROs with Bulb Bows need rudder corrections by
        computer every 20 seconds) . This is the result of tests and
        development work from a friend over a span of 25 years. He started
        with Sail- and Motor Boats and now develops RO - RO Carriers of 450
        ft. The shapes are of course not the s a m e, but they are s i m i l
        i a r.
        From this I´m very interested in any literature about the Tunnel -
        Stern Designs ( esp. Sand Piper ). I´ve read already all the early
        postings about Tunnel - Stern Designs an will continue my research
        about the work of William Atkin who found out this effective shape so
        early as 1922 !!!! I´m hoping for a bit help. Regards, Manfred
      • ronschwiesow
        ... so early as 1922 !!!! I´m hoping for a bit of help. Regards, Manfred This is helpful reference to additional support for the efficiency of Atkin s hull
        Message 3 of 4 , Dec 3, 2004
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          --- In AtkinBoats@yahoogroups.com, "liokai2002" <manfred.pech@w...>
          wrote:
          > What struck me most was the reverse-V tunnel stern.
          > From tank tests at Duisburg University and a tank in Berlin I know
          > that underwater shapes similiar to Sand Piper are hydrodynamically
          > the most effective - not only in shallow waters. Boats with these
          > shapes are faster, need less fuel an have more course stability in
          > waves (safer, RO-ROs with Bulb Bows need rudder corrections by
          > computer every 20 seconds). This is the result of tests and
          > development work from a friend over a span of 25 years. He started
          > with Sail- and Motor Boats and now develops RO - RO Carriers of 450
          > ft. The shapes are of course not the same, but they are similiar.
          > From this I´m very interested in any literature about the Tunnel-
          > Stern Designs (esp. Sand Piper). I´ve read already all the early
          > postings about Tunnel-Stern Designs an will continue my research
          > about the work of William Atkin who found out this effective shape
          so early as 1922 !!!! I´m hoping for a bit of help. Regards,
          Manfred

          This is helpful reference to additional support for the efficiency of
          Atkin's hull design. If you haven't yet seen it you might enjoy
          looking at information on the Atkin Rescue Minor that Robb White
          built and tested. See
          http://www.messingaboutinboats.com/archives/mbissueaugust02.html.
          Also Dave Gerr has at least one design with a similar hull; see
          http://www.gerrmarine.com/images/boat_images/power/gerr42tunnel/gerr42
          tunnelD.GIF
          The Higgins boats also used the reverse vee stern, although it is a
          little hard to determine that from available pictures. See
          http://www.higginsmemorial.com/design.asp and
          http://www.higginsboat.org/html/photo/phot012.html

          I am particularly interested in a cruiser for 2, intermediate in size
          between Atkin's Rescue Minor and his River Belle. Intended speed is
          slower than the designed maximum for either of these designs. I'm not
          sure how the tunnel-stern, V-bottom Seabright Skiff hull form
          performs at low speed, but Robb White's observations are encouraging.
          Ron
        • liokai2002
          Hello Ron and Rob thank you both very much for your kind help and support to understand more of Atkins SAND PIPER hull design. I would like to put some fotos
          Message 4 of 4 , Dec 7, 2004
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            Hello Ron and Rob thank you both very much for your kind help and
            support to understand more of Atkins SAND PIPER hull design. I would
            like to put some fotos of "Maderform" hulls (RO-ROs) and University
            papers into the files, but have difficulies with my Windows messenger
            since I've changed my Internet provider to DSL and am not able to
            extinguish the old server adress. But I hope to overcome my
            difficulties soon.
            As I understand the Links from you Ron, the genius William Atkin
            designed SAND PIPER and Mr. Higgins from Higgins Industries adepted
            it and modified it to EUREKA and then to a landing craft that helped
            to free us from Nazi Terrorism in Europe. Or are EUREKA and the
            LANDING boat Higgins own designs without the influence of the Atkins ?

            The "Maderform" hulls in Germany started in the seventies from the
            idea that the underside of an aircraft wing (too) gives aerodynamic
            lift. From this the underside (in water) of a boat has to have a
            similiar shape. But this was only a first step. Hundreds of tests
            have been made and boats and ships have been built with increasing
            successful results. As one can see from the University tests and the
            Mathematics with NAVIER - STOKES formula there is a certain amount of
            lift from the special underwater shape to counteract the sucction
            (Bernoulli) of other (convex) boat shapes and a very smooth waterflow
            and a very low wake behind the boats and ships. I do not know whether
            the designer of the "Maderform" hulls has ever seen the SAND PIPER
            drawings or Mr. Higgins Landing boats. But I would like to ask him
            next time I meet him.

            I don`t know whether the SAND PIPER has ever been tested in a Tank
            test. But it is my strong opinion that this design will show a lot of
            advantages over current boats. It is a pity that there is not known
            enough to get proved results and to give this designs the recognition
            and honor it deserves. Thank you for your help. Regards, Manfred
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