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Retreat, a shantyboat deluxe

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  • mikegt4
    Retreat always comes to mind when the pressures of life weigh heavy on one s shoulders. Kids, job and cold winter weather got me dreaming about what Retreat
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 27, 2008
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      Retreat always comes to mind when the pressures of life weigh heavy on
      one's shoulders. Kids, job and cold winter weather got me dreaming
      about what Retreat has to offer.

      Roger Taylor's "Thirty Classic Boat Designs" has a chapter on Retreat
      in which he mentions that Harlan & Anna Hubbard spent 7 years on their
      boat traveling from Brent, Ky down the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers.
      Two things piqued my interest;
      1) what kind of people could (would) do that?
      2) I live in Cincinnati and Brent, Ky is nearby.

      A Google search revealed a very interesting couple. Harlan Hubbard was
      a quite well known artist, author and a devoted follower of the
      minimalist lifestyle of Henry David Thoreau. That would explain 10
      years on Retreat! He wrote several books about his time on the water.

      The "Kentucky Historical Society Digital Collections" website has
      several photos of the Hubbards building their Retreat below Ft.
      Thomas, Ky on the banks of the Ohio River. Cincinnati locals will no
      doubt recognize several landmarks.

      Kentucky Historical Society
      http://205.204.134.47:2005/index.php
      type "hubbard" in the "search" box, upper right of page

      also:
      http://www.harlanhubbard.com/

      Interesting reading on a cold winter night.
      Mike
    • Bob Johnson
      Just to clarify a bit, but the Hubbard s shanty boat was not an Atkin s Retreat . The Hubbards was both longer and quite a bit beamier. The Hubbard shanty
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 28, 2008
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        Just to clarify a bit, but the Hubbard's shanty boat was not an Atkin's
        "Retreat". The Hubbards was both longer and quite a bit beamier.
        The Hubbard shanty boat was 20 feet on the bottom, plus the length of
        the rakes at each end, so it was probably at least 24 to 26 feet long
        overall. And the beam was 10 feet. Compare this to Retreat's 18 foot
        length and 7 foot beam, and you'll see that the Hubbards had quite a
        bit more living space. They also kept their interior mostly open and
        clear, with a bed that stored away under the front deck each day and
        other such features.

        Still, not a lot of space by today's standards, and as Mike says, very
        interesting reading.

        Bob
        ---

        > 2. Retreat, a shantyboat deluxe
        > Posted by: "mikegt4" dawson-md@... mikegt4
        > Date: Sun Jan 27, 2008 5:52 pm ((PST))
        >
        > Retreat always comes to mind when the pressures of life weigh heavy on
        > one's shoulders. Kids, job and cold winter weather got me dreaming
        > about what Retreat has to offer.
        >
        > Roger Taylor's "Thirty Classic Boat Designs" has a chapter on Retreat
        > in which he mentions that Harlan & Anna Hubbard spent 7 years on their
        > boat traveling from Brent, Ky down the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers.
        > Two things piqued my interest;
        > 1) what kind of people could (would) do that?
        > 2) I live in Cincinnati and Brent, Ky is nearby.
        >
        > A Google search revealed a very interesting couple. Harlan Hubbard was
        > a quite well known artist, author and a devoted follower of the
        > minimalist lifestyle of Henry David Thoreau. That would explain 10
        > years on Retreat! He wrote several books about his time on the water.
        >
        > The "Kentucky Historical Society Digital Collections" website has
        > several photos of the Hubbards building their Retreat below Ft.
        > Thomas, Ky on the banks of the Ohio River. Cincinnati locals will no
        > doubt recognize several landmarks.
        >
        > Kentucky Historical Society
        > http://205.204.134.47:2005/index.php
        > type "hubbard" in the "search" box, upper right of page
        >
        > also:
        > http://www.harlanhubbard.com/
        >
        > Interesting reading on a cold winter night.
        > Mike
        >
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