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Re: [AtkinBoats] Seabright Skiffs, again

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  • Kenneth Grome
    Hi Andrew, It may be that the introduction of plywood as a reliable boat building material, and the availability of a variety of new and reliable inboard
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 31, 2007
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      Hi Andrew,

      It may be that the introduction of plywood as a reliable boat building
      material, and the availability of a variety of new and reliable inboard
      engines, influenced the design evolution you recognized. Then again, I
      also believe there are two distinctly different types of Seabright
      skiffs in the Atkin collection ...

      When I first began to research these boats I learned that I had to be
      careful to distinguish between their original Seabright skiffs and the
      ones Atkin terms "tunnel-stern" Seabright skiffs. These are two
      different boats in my opinion. I think the tunnel-stern boats were
      designed for low-end planing speeds rather than displacement speeds so
      they need a wide planing surface aft, and that's where the tunnel-stern
      came from.

      The latest (and theoretically the most refined) of the smaller Seabright
      skiffs designed by William Atkin is the tunnel-stern model
      called "Shoals Runner". Lots of people appear to be more interested in
      Rescue Minor, but there are subtle yet substantial differences in these
      two boats when you compare their lines, and I think Shoals Runner is
      more refined and probably resolves some of the issues reported by
      Rescue Minor users.

      I'm told that John Atkin continued to design tunnel-stern Seabright
      skiffs after his father's death, but it seems John's designs were much
      larger and heavier than his father's boats -- more like cruisers than
      utilities or runabouts -- and their bottom geometry is different
      because of their size, weight and lower top speeds.

      These boats are very interesting -- all of them. If the reports are
      true it seems they offer a number of desirable features that can seldom
      be found in the same combination in the popular plastic outboard
      powered boats so many people seem to want to buy these days.

      Sincerely,
      Ken Grome
      Bagacay Boatworks
      www.bagacayboatworks.com




      > I am wondering about the evolution of the atkins' seabright skiffs,
      > especially the open utility models like Everhope and Rescue Miner. It
      > seems that aproximately after WWII Wm. Atkin prefered the V bottom
      > design, like RM, Nibble, Sallie Hyde, etc., to the earlier, more
      > traditional round bildge models like Everhope and Sunray. I wonder if
      > this was because the hard chine hulls proved to be better, or if they
      > were just easier to build.
      > Andrew Harvey
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