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Re: Willy Winship - any body built one? Can help answering some questions?

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  • piper_tim
    OK, next question... where can I find 20 feet of fir to make the mast? What about the sails, anyone know of a good sailmaker that could make the sails for
    Message 1 of 13 , Oct 21, 2007
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      OK, next question... where can I find 20 feet of fir to make the mast? What about the
      sails, anyone know of a good sailmaker that could make the sails for this boat?

      Tim


      --- In AtkinBoats@yahoogroups.com, "Don Douglas" <douglashome@...> wrote:
      >
      > Tim
      >
      > After going back to the site and reviewing the description and drawings, holzboat has
      the correct process for this boat. The frames taper to the top and would not leave much
      to run down to the floor for setup. Plus unless you are going to use a plywood bottom,
      there are no athwart frames on the bottom to join the side frames. That pretty much
      eliminates using permanent frames as the molds. So I think normal molds and building
      upside down is the way to go. The temporary cross spalls would hold everything right
      while the side frame are being installed where a mold was. And once the bottom is on and
      the boat righted, the rest should be straight forward. Rossel goes over this type of
      construction in Chapter 5 in pretty good detail.
      >
      > Have fun
      > Don
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • Kenneth Grome
      ... These guys have a good reputation according to what others have posted online: http://www.leesails.com/ Sincerely, Ken Grome Bagacay Boatworks
      Message 2 of 13 , Oct 21, 2007
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        > What about the sails, anyone know
        > of a good sailmaker that could make
        > the sails for this boat?

        These guys have a good reputation according to what others have posted
        online:

        http://www.leesails.com/

        Sincerely,
        Ken Grome
        Bagacay Boatworks
        www.bagacayboatworks.com
      • John Kohnen
        Plywood planking will work fine for Willy Winship. Put the plywood on the bottom with the surface grain running _across_ the boat. WW is built pretty stout,
        Message 3 of 13 , Oct 23, 2007
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          Plywood planking will work fine for Willy Winship. Put the plywood on the
          bottom with the surface grain running _across_ the boat. WW is built
          pretty stout, I'd use 1/2" plywood on the bottom and 3/8" on the sides
          (1/4" if you do lapstrake sides with plywood "planks"). Do the framing
          just like the plans call for.

          You need to loft the lines full size before building your strongback and
          forms. Pretty simple to do for a flat-bottom skiff, and it might save you
          trouble later.

          Good luck with your project, and be sure to keep us informed of your
          progress.

          On Wed, 17 Oct 2007 19:36:57 -0700, Tim wrote:

          > Flat bottomed and slab sides is why I chose this boat. I was planning
          > to make it all from
          > ply, but I think I like the way it looks cross planked and lapstraked.
          > Still, for my second
          > boat, I think all ply may be the way to go.
          > ...
          > So, the first of many upcoming questions is: I'm assuming that I need
          > to build a
          > strongback with the forms given on the plans,
          > ...

          --
          John <jkohnen@...>
          Correlation does not imply causation; except, of course, to your
          cat. <Craig O'Donnell>
        • John Kohnen
          If plywood is used with the surface grain running across the bottom there s no need for the complication of bottom frames. You could use thinner plywood if
          Message 4 of 13 , Oct 23, 2007
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            If plywood is used with the surface grain running across the bottom
            there's no need for the complication of bottom frames. You could use
            thinner plywood if there were cross frames, but bottom frames in a
            flat-bottom boat are poor shipmates. :o( They make it harder to keep the
            boat clean and dry and complicate maintenance. :ob I know all about 'em --
            my sailing skiff has bottom frames.

            On Sat, 20 Oct 2007 06:56:57 -0700, Don D wrote:

            > ...
            > unless you are going to use a plywood bottom, there are no athwart
            > frames on the bottom to join the side frames....

            --
            John <jkohnen@...>
            The way to fight a woman is with your hat. Grab it and run.
            <John Barrymore>
          • John Kohnen
            Nowadays it makes sense to make the mast hollow, using the birdsmouth method (Google birdsmouth mast and you ll find plenty of info). You can resaw lesser
            Message 5 of 13 , Oct 23, 2007
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              Nowadays it makes sense to make the mast hollow, using the "birdsmouth"
              method (Google "birdsmouth mast" and you'll find plenty of info). You can
              resaw lesser quality lumber to get good "staves" and even scarf together
              shorter pieces to make them, if necessary. Easier than finding a good
              solid stick. I missed your location, if you told us, but suitable Douglas
              fir is usually available in the west, and spruce on the east coast. Don't
              go to Home Despot or other big box stores, find a real lumber yard that
              sells to builders. Make the hollow mast 4% larger in diameter than the
              solid stick, and make the staves so the least thickness of the mast walls
              is 20% of the diameter (sorry, I can't find the easy way to calculate this
              right now...). You could also do a triangular hollow mast, as shown in the
              article by John Atkin I recently put online.

              Duckworks sells sails for a good price, and I've heard good things about
              them (the sails, Duckworks is better than "good" <g>):

              http://www.duckworksbbs.com/sails.htm

              On Sun, 21 Oct 2007 19:38:58 -0700, Tim wrote:

              > OK, next question... where can I find 20 feet of fir to make the mast?
              > What about the
              > sails, anyone know of a good sailmaker that could make the sails for
              > this boat?

              --
              John <jkohnen@...>
              To delight in war is a merit in the soldier, a dangerous quality
              in the captain, and a positive crime in the statesman. <George
              Santayana>
            • David
              Tim, We got a custom sail last year from Duckworks. Quite happy with it. http://www.duckworksbbs.com/sails.htm Cheers, David Graybeal Portland, OR These are
              Message 6 of 13 , Nov 5, 2007
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                Tim,

                We got a custom sail last year from Duckworks. Quite happy with it.

                http://www.duckworksbbs.com/sails.htm

                Cheers,
                David Graybeal
                Portland, OR

                "These are my principles, and if you don't like them... well, I have
                others" -- Groucho Marx

                ***********

                --- In AtkinBoats@yahoogroups.com, "piper_tim" <timrein@...> wrote:
                >
                > OK, next question... where can I find 20 feet of fir to make the
                mast? What about the
                > sails, anyone know of a good sailmaker that could make the sails for
                this boat?
                >
                > Tim
                >
                >
                > --- In AtkinBoats@yahoogroups.com, "Don Douglas" <douglashome@> wrote:
                > >
                > > Tim
                > >
                > > After going back to the site and reviewing the description and
                drawings, holzboat has
                > the correct process for this boat. The frames taper to the top and
                would not leave much
                > to run down to the floor for setup. Plus unless you are going to
                use a plywood bottom,
                > there are no athwart frames on the bottom to join the side frames.
                That pretty much
                > eliminates using permanent frames as the molds. So I think normal
                molds and building
                > upside down is the way to go. The temporary cross spalls would hold
                everything right
                > while the side frame are being installed where a mold was. And once
                the bottom is on and
                > the boat righted, the rest should be straight forward. Rossel goes
                over this type of
                > construction in Chapter 5 in pretty good detail.
                > >
                > > Have fun
                > > Don
                > >
                > >
                > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > >
                >
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