Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [AtkinBoats] Looking for Eric Jr.

Expand Messages
  • John Kohnen
    A long time ago a fellow named Archimedes proved that the weight of the water a floating object displaces is equal to the weight of the object. But the
    Message 1 of 11 , Jul 23, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      A long time ago a fellow named Archimedes proved that the weight of the
      water a floating object displaces is equal to the weight of the object.
      But the designed displacement of a boat rarely equals its actual
      weight/displacement. The design displacement is an educated guess by the
      designer of the weight of the empty boat, plus the weight of the usual
      crew, fuel, drinking water, food, spare parts, tools, and so on. Usually
      the designers don't realize just how much _stuff_ people can cram into
      their cruising boats, so many boats end up displacing more than the
      designer intended, and they get heavier as they get older. <g>

      On Thu, 19 Jul 2007 09:46:03 -0700, Dirt wrote:

      > Well here's a few things that should get you pointed
      > in the right direction. Eric jr is a great looking
      > boat, but in no way is it a trailer boat. Displacement
      > is the volume of water that is displaced by the hull
      > of the vessel measured in pounds or tons, it is not
      > the actual weight of the boat....

      --
      John <jkohnen@...>
      Never board a ship without an onion, is sound doctrine. <H. W.
      Tilman>
    • ludlowmediaproductions
      Justin, Just go buy a small day sailer, throw up the rags and have some fun man. Don t get bogged down in all the details of finding the perfect boat. If I
      Message 2 of 11 , Jul 24, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        Justin,

        Just go buy a small day sailer, throw up the rags and have some fun
        man. Don't get bogged down in all the details of finding the perfect
        boat. If I was you my criteria would be something cheap to store in
        the water ready to take off at a minutes notice.

        Buy something small, fast, and tender. why? because thats the kind of
        boat thats going to be the most fun to sail if your inexperienced, and
        you will learn to sail a lot faster than on a larger boat. Also if you
        blow your whole wad up front your constantly going to worried about
        doing any damage and frankly you probably will.

        thats my two cents take it or leave it but just find a way to go
        sailing. Good luck man.

        Ollie
      • Kenneth Grome
        Can anyone tell me where I can get a propeller shaft seal like the one Robb White used on his Rescue Minor? I think he used one that was made for a water pump,
        Message 3 of 11 , Aug 16, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          Can anyone tell me where I can get a propeller shaft seal like the one
          Robb White used on his Rescue Minor?

          I think he used one that was made for a water pump, didn't he?

          Sincerely,
          Ken Grome
          Bagacay Boatworks
          www.bagacayboatworks.com
        • Ron Butterfield
          I haven t seen what he used, but based on his description, I think what are shown on this page are similar: http://www.mcmaster.com/nav/enter.asp?pagenum=3372
          Message 4 of 11 , Aug 16, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            I haven't seen what he used, but based on his description, I think
            what are shown on this page are similar:
            http://www.mcmaster.com/nav/enter.asp?pagenum=3372

            --
            Regards,
            RonB

            On 8/16/07, Kenneth Grome <bagacayboatworks@...> wrote:
            > Can anyone tell me where I can get a propeller shaft seal like the one
            > Robb White used on his Rescue Minor?
            >
            > I think he used one that was made for a water pump, didn't he?
            >
            > Sincerely,
            > Ken Grome
            > Bagacay Boatworks
            > www.bagacayboatworks.com
          • Kenneth Grome
            ... Hi Ron, Thanks for that link! It got me started on the right track, then I found some other web sites with even more details on this type of pump shaft
            Message 5 of 11 , Aug 16, 2007
            • 0 Attachment
              > I haven't seen what he used, but based on his description,
              > I think what are shown on this page are similar:
              > http://www.mcmaster.com/nav/enter.asp?pagenum=3372


              Hi Ron,

              Thanks for that link! It got me started on the right track, then I
              found some other web sites with even more details on this type of pump
              shaft seal. It looks like I can use them in the boat I'm building now,
              and well as in several of the inboard powered boats I'm designing.

              These Atkin tunnel-stern Seabright skiffs are intriguing to me. I
              especially like Shoals Runner's bottom design. I know of no other boat
              that offers such an attractive combination of features as these:

              1- a very well protected propeller and rudder
              2- drafts only 6-7 inches with the prop in the water
              3- sits stable and upright when out of the water
              4- can be beached almost anywhere without damage
              5- can be trailered on a cheap flatbed utility trailer
              6- is very seaworthiness in offshore conditions
              7- uses an inexpensive, fuel efficient inboard engine
              8- gets better than average mileage at 15-20 mph
              9- runs efficiently throughout its entire speed range

              Lots of people seem to be very intrigued by Rescue Minor. But as I
              understand it, Shoals Runner is William Atkin's last design of this
              type. This suggests that he may have identified deficiencies in his
              earlier models (possibly including Rescue Minor) and corrected them
              when he designed Shoals Runner.

              This is only a theory of course, but it appears to 'make sense' to me
              after reading performance reports on Rescue Minor and noting subtle
              differences in the characteristics of these two hulls from the line
              drawings on the web site.

              I'm designing some new versions of these tunnel-stern Seabright skiffs
              myself. I'm leaning toward hull bottoms that look more like Shoals
              Runner because of my theory that the more recent designs in a naval
              architect's portfolio are often better boats than earlier models.

              Sincerely,
              Ken Grome
              Bagacay Boatworks
              www.bagacayboatworks.com
            • Lewis E. Gordon
              Kenneth, I also remember reading that Robb changed to a conventional shaft seal after hearing that the ceramic types, when failing, failed suddenly with no
              Message 6 of 11 , Aug 16, 2007
              • 0 Attachment
                Kenneth,

                I also remember reading that Robb changed to a conventional shaft seal
                after hearing that the ceramic types, when failing, failed suddenly
                with no warning at all.

                Lewis

                --- In AtkinBoats@yahoogroups.com, Kenneth Grome <bagacayboatworks@...>
                wrote:
                >
                > > I haven't seen what he used, but based on his description,
                > > I think what are shown on this page are similar:
                > > http://www.mcmaster.com/nav/enter.asp?pagenum=3372
                >
                >
                > Hi Ron,
                >
                > Thanks for that link! It got me started on the right track, then I
                > found some other web sites with even more details on this type of pump
                > shaft seal. It looks like I can use them in the boat I'm building
                now,
                > and well as in several of the inboard powered boats I'm designing.
                >
                > These Atkin tunnel-stern Seabright skiffs are intriguing to me. I
                > especially like Shoals Runner's bottom design. I know of no other
                boat
                > that offers such an attractive combination of features as these:
                >
                > 1- a very well protected propeller and rudder
                > 2- drafts only 6-7 inches with the prop in the water
                > 3- sits stable and upright when out of the water
                > 4- can be beached almost anywhere without damage
                > 5- can be trailered on a cheap flatbed utility trailer
                > 6- is very seaworthiness in offshore conditions
                > 7- uses an inexpensive, fuel efficient inboard engine
                > 8- gets better than average mileage at 15-20 mph
                > 9- runs efficiently throughout its entire speed range
                >
                > Lots of people seem to be very intrigued by Rescue Minor. But as I
                > understand it, Shoals Runner is William Atkin's last design of this
                > type. This suggests that he may have identified deficiencies in his
                > earlier models (possibly including Rescue Minor) and corrected them
                > when he designed Shoals Runner.
                >
                > This is only a theory of course, but it appears to 'make sense' to me
                > after reading performance reports on Rescue Minor and noting subtle
                > differences in the characteristics of these two hulls from the line
                > drawings on the web site.
                >
                > I'm designing some new versions of these tunnel-stern Seabright skiffs
                > myself. I'm leaning toward hull bottoms that look more like Shoals
                > Runner because of my theory that the more recent designs in a naval
                > architect's portfolio are often better boats than earlier models.
                >
                > Sincerely,
                > Ken Grome
                > Bagacay Boatworks
                > www.bagacayboatworks.com
                >



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Kenneth Grome
                ... Hi Lewis, Thanks for this information. Do you happen to remember where you heard or read this? If so can you point me to the reference? I m asking
                Message 7 of 11 , Aug 16, 2007
                • 0 Attachment
                  > I also remember reading that Robb changed to
                  > a conventional shaft seal after hearing that the
                  > ceramic types, when failing, failed suddenly with
                  > no warning at all.


                  Hi Lewis,

                  Thanks for this information.

                  Do you happen to remember where you heard or read this? If so can you
                  point me to the reference? I'm asking because I thought I had read
                  everything there is to read about Robb's Rescue Minor, and this is news
                  to me.

                  I don't know much about ceramic shaft seals either. Maybe they fail
                  catastrophically and maybe they don't. I'm reading about them now ...

                  Sincerely,
                  Ken Grome
                  Bagacay Boatworks
                  www.bagacayboatworks.com
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.