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Re: plywood Rocking Chair (was Horse by mistake)

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  • alan terry
    ... up, then ... plywood, ... cabin and ... Yes, sounds pretty good to me. From what I ve learned in the first few hours of my crash course in aluminum
    Message 1 of 14 , Mar 5, 2004
      --- In AtkinBoats@yahoogroups.com, jkohnen@b... wrote:
      > You could cut the parts for a metal hull and get everything set
      up, then
      > hire a welder for the assembly. You might still save money over
      plywood,
      > glass and epoxy. Once the hull was welded up, you could do the
      cabin and
      > interior in wood.


      Yes, sounds pretty good to me. From what I've learned in the first
      few hours of my crash course in aluminum fabrication it's more akin
      to wood construction than steel. Setup shouldn't be all that
      difficult. How do you reckon it would work to do the cabin AND the
      decks all in plywood/timber and use the aluminum for the hull sides
      and bottom only ?? There's something a bit raw about aluminum decks.
    • alan terry
      ... some advice ... I did. It s quite interesting, even if rather basic. Following up the talk about metal boats I came across BOATBUILDING WITH ALUMINUM by
      Message 2 of 14 , Mar 6, 2004
        --- In AtkinBoats@yahoogroups.com, craig o'donnell <dadadata@f...>
        wrote:

        > Harry Sucher's SIMPLIFIED BOATBUILDING/FLAT BOTTOM BOATS gives
        some advice
        > on equivalent construction for scow hulls. Try interlibrary loan

        I did. It's quite interesting, even if rather basic. Following up
        the talk about metal boats I came across BOATBUILDING WITH ALUMINUM
        by Stephen F. Pollard at the local library. To my suprise, it's
        aimed at the backyard builder and is very readable. There were
        multiple copies on the shelves.

        alanterry
      • jkohnen@boat-links.com
        Wooden decks on a metal hull has been done many times. You ve got to be careful at the joint between the deck and hull to make sure it s watertight. Any joint
        Message 3 of 14 , Mar 11, 2004
          Wooden decks on a metal hull has been done many times. You've got to be
          careful at the joint between the deck and hull to make sure it's watertight.
          Any joint between metal and wood is going to be a potential rot spot, so
          take precautions.

          Even though I'm the one who brought up metal construction, I think if I was
          building one of the houseboats, and it was going to live in the water, I'd
          do it plank on frame. I like working with wood better than metal, and the
          relatively thick wooden planking is a good insulator.

          On Sat, 06 Mar 2004 03:32:25 -0000, Alan wrote:
          > ...
          > Yes, sounds pretty good to me. From what I've learned in the first
          > few hours of my crash course in aluminum fabrication it's more akin
          > to wood construction than steel. Setup shouldn't be all that
          > difficult. How do you reckon it would work to do the cabin AND the
          > decks all in plywood/timber and use the aluminum for the hull sides
          > and bottom only ?? There's something a bit raw about aluminum decks.

          --
          John <jkohnen@...>
          http://www.boat-links.com/
          Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend.
          Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read. <Groucho Marx>
        • lon wells
          jkohnen@boat-links.com wrote: .... Even though I m the one who brought up metal construction, I think if I was building one of the houseboats, and it was going
          Message 4 of 14 , Mar 11, 2004
            jkohnen@... wrote:
            ...."Even though I'm the one who brought up metal construction, I think if I was building one of the houseboats, and it was going to live in the water, I'd do it plank on frame. I like working with wood better than metal, and the
            relatively thick wooden planking is a good insulator."



            Greetings

            Another way would be to do a composite construction with steel frame and wood planking and decks. Legendary Yachts in Washougal Washington makes some very fine Yachts using this construction method.

            http://www.legendaryyachts.com/composit_construction.htm

            Lon




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          • alan terry
            ... I think if I was ... water, I d ... and the ... Coincidently I have returned to favouring wood construction --- after several days of infatuation with the
            Message 5 of 14 , Mar 12, 2004
              --- In AtkinBoats@yahoogroups.com, jkohnen@b... wrote:

              I think if I was
              > building one of the houseboats, and it was going to live in the
              water, I'd
              > do it plank on frame. I like working with wood better than metal,
              and the
              > relatively thick wooden planking is a good insulator.

              Coincidently I have returned to favouring wood construction ---
              after several days of infatuation with the idea of building in
              aluminum. I discovered that, broadly speaking, the cost of materials
              alone are similar for aluminum and for HIGH QUALITY timber plus
              epoxy glassing.
              For aluminum I would have to hire skilled labour, but not for
              timber. And of course, I can make do with less than high quality
              timber. Taking these factors into account the cost of timber is
              about one half that of aluminum. More important, using aluminum
              would have encouraged me to get more fancy and fussy than I want.
              The original idea was to have a simple boat built to a workboat
              standard, that could be finished in months, not years.
              The construction I now have firmly in mind is epoxy glued plank
              (18mm) on frame covered with a layer of plywood and then epoxy
              glassed. From the inside the appearance would be like cold moulded
              plank on frame (better resale value, better looking, etc.), but the
              outside would have all the benefits of glass sheathing.
              And I like working with wood best as well :)

              Alan
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