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Gardner garvey

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  • bru08107
    Reading a John Gardner book of boat plans you can build I noticed a odd garvey with a stern like the Atkins minors The book isn t illustrated to the point of
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 14, 2006
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      Reading a John Gardner book of boat plans you can build I noticed a
      odd garvey with a stern like the Atkins "minors" The book isn't
      illustrated to the point of me being able to make clear observations
      which leaves me with questions. Does the tunnel stern adapt to a motor
      well? I am trying to get a design that will allow me full use of the
      transom for fishing in a light trailerable boat. 16-22 feet, 1000 lbs
      or less. No frills day tripper, rinse and cover, till next trip.
      Yours,
      Bruce
    • Lewis E. Gordon
      Bruce, Rob pointed out in his post (on another thread) some of the differences between the Atkins tunnel sterns and other derivatives, but I thought I would
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 15, 2006
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        Bruce,

        Rob pointed out in his post (on another thread) some of the
        differences between the Atkins tunnel sterns and other derivatives,
        but I thought I would add my 5 cents worth (inflation you know). Rob
        also asked the key question of how fast you want to go.

        The pages in my copy of Mr. Gardner's book are very well "thumbed" at
        the chapters of those two garveys. The 18' V-tunnel is interesting and
        should be fast with modest power. I have a short shaft 40HP Evinrude
        that needs a hull which is why that design is looked at so often. This
        motor was used in North Carolina on an 18' shallow-V plywood "well
        boat", with the transom left clear for gill-netting. The well was
        identical to some that Mr. Gardner specified on several of his
        designs. I never liked this combination for several reasons. (1) it
        lost a lot of displacement at the stern because of the well. (2) the
        motors "shallow draft" feature was unusable because the propeller hit
        the sides of the well if trying to make any kind of turn. And (3) the
        trim angle was non-adjustable because you had to lift the heavy motor
        out of the well to make the adjustment. I must add, however, that this
        boat was very well used, moderately fast, and extremely economical
        with fuel.

        If you want to go a little slower and have a clear transom, the 18'
        10" garvey in the previous chapter is appealing. But, to finally
        answer your question, I don't think it is possible to combine "tunnel
        technology" and a well with any success. You would lose too much
        displacement as well as the other problems Rob pointed out.

        Now to keep this long post on topic, if anyone knows of an Atkins
        design to hang my 40 HP off the transom I would like to hear your
        ideas, as I just haven't found anything I like. The requirements are:
        to use on a very large lake with a wicked short and steep chop, cruse
        speed of 15-18 mph at about 2/3 throttle, and to be built plank on
        frame (no plywood available).

        Lewis


        --- In AtkinBoats@yahoogroups.com, "bru08107" <echo172@...> wrote:
        >
        > Reading a John Gardner book of boat plans you can build I noticed a
        > odd garvey with a stern like the Atkins "minors" The book isn't
        > illustrated to the point of me being able to make clear observations
        > which leaves me with questions. Does the tunnel stern adapt to a motor
        > well? I am trying to get a design that will allow me full use of the
        > transom for fishing in a light trailerable boat. 16-22 feet, 1000 lbs
        > or less. No frills day tripper, rinse and cover, till next trip.
        > Yours,
        > Bruce
        >
      • John Kohnen
        Ninigret could be built plank-on-frame. Her sides are already lapstrake and you could do the bottom batten-seam. Forty horses would push a Ninigret along fine.
        Message 3 of 3 , Jul 28, 2006
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          Ninigret could be built plank-on-frame. Her sides are already lapstrake
          and you could do the bottom batten-seam. Forty horses would push a
          Ninigret along fine.

          On Sat, 15 Jul 2006 09:00:04 -0700, Lewis wrote:

          > ...
          > Now to keep this long post on topic, if anyone knows of an Atkins
          > design to hang my 40 HP off the transom I would like to hear your
          > ideas, as I just haven't found anything I like. The requirements are:
          > to use on a very large lake with a wicked short and steep chop, cruse
          > speed of 15-18 mph at about 2/3 throttle, and to be built plank on
          > frame (no plywood available).

          --
          John <jkohnen@...>
          A facility for quotation covers the absence of original thought.
          <Lord Peter Wimsey>
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