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you guys are right

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  • mike
    yea i finally come to my senses. i feel that i still would like to build a martha green but keep her exactly as drawn, maybe a 10% stetch. a small diesel and
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 7, 2006
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      yea i finally come to my senses. i feel that i still would like to
      build a martha green but keep her exactly as drawn, maybe a 10%
      stetch. a small diesel and it would be a lovely boat to take
      fishing.my only cocern is how would martha's costruction hold up to
      trailering. at 8' 4" beam is no problem. would sheathing the hull in
      glass help her hod up better for road travel.
    • John Kohnen
      I m glad you finally woke up Mike! ;o) John Atkin designed a slightly larger version of Martha Green and it may in fact be the boat purported to be a Martha
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 8, 2006
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        I'm glad you finally woke up Mike! ;o) John Atkin designed a slightly
        larger version of Martha Green and it may in fact be the boat purported to
        be a Martha Green in the Atkin photos page. Dick Trask wrote me, "I
        believe that the boat shown as "Martha Green" (24') in the photograph
        is really "Calisto V. Canelli", a 27' power cruiser along the same lines
        designed by John Atkin in 1968 (See Boat Design Quarterly #24)." I'll see
        if Mrs. Atkin has the plans available.

        Martha Green or Calisto V. Canelli would be Big boats to tow around.
        :o( If you persist with that notion a cold-molded bottom, or maybe three
        layers of thin planking laid athwartships so you can use the same framing
        plan, and plywood topsides would be the way to go. Lots of plywood boats
        have been built without fiberglass sheathing and lasted well. Sheathing
        the bottom will protect it from bangs and abrasion though. I wouldn't
        sheath over the deadwood, unless you laminated it out of thin pieces of
        wood -- maybe not a bad idea anyway for a trailered boat...

        On Wed, 07 Jun 2006 18:25:22 -0700, mike wrote:

        > yea i finally come to my senses. i feel that i still would like to
        > build a martha green but keep her exactly as drawn, maybe a 10%
        > stetch. a small diesel and it would be a lovely boat to take
        > fishing.my only cocern is how would martha's costruction hold up to
        > trailering. at 8' 4" beam is no problem. would sheathing the hull in
        > glass help her hod up better for road travel.

        --
        John <jkohnen@...>
        He could do anything he put his mind to, except put on a white
        shirt and tie. <said of Clifford James Dickson by his daughter>
      • David
        Mike, Good for you. As you build, please take lots of fotos to share with the group. If you want to be immortalized, write up your boatbuilding journey and
        Message 3 of 5 , Jun 9, 2006
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          Mike,

          Good for you. As you build, please take lots of fotos to share with
          the group. If you want to be immortalized, write up your boatbuilding
          journey and submit it to Duckworks Magazine. I envy you, and
          definitely want to hear how it goes. Did you say... what part of the
          world are you in?

          Cheers,
          David Graybeal
          Portland, OR

          "The cure for anything is Salt Water... sweat, tears, or the sea" --
          Isak Dinesen

          *******************

          --- In AtkinBoats@yahoogroups.com, "mike" <circvildawg@...> wrote:
          >
          > yea i finally come to my senses. i feel that i still would like to
          > build a martha green but keep her exactly as drawn, maybe a 10%
          > stetch. a small diesel and it would be a lovely boat to take
          > fishing.my only cocern is how would martha's costruction hold up to
          > trailering. at 8' 4" beam is no problem. would sheathing the hull in
          > glass help her hod up better for road travel.
          >
        • mike
          ... boatbuilding ... the ... - ... to ... to ... hull in ... i m in central ohio. i hope to buy the plans with in a year and start my build as soon as i clear
          Message 4 of 5 , Jun 9, 2006
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            --- In AtkinBoats@yahoogroups.com, "David" <arbordg@...> wrote:
            >
            > Mike,
            >
            > Good for you. As you build, please take lots of fotos to share with
            > the group. If you want to be immortalized, write up your
            boatbuilding
            > journey and submit it to Duckworks Magazine. I envy you, and
            > definitely want to hear how it goes. Did you say... what part of
            the
            > world are you in?
            >
            > Cheers,
            > David Graybeal
            > Portland, OR
            >
            > "The cure for anything is Salt Water... sweat, tears, or the sea" -
            -
            > Isak Dinesen
            >
            > *******************
            >
            > --- In AtkinBoats@yahoogroups.com, "mike" <circvildawg@> wrote:
            > >
            > > yea i finally come to my senses. i feel that i still would like
            to
            > > build a martha green but keep her exactly as drawn, maybe a 10%
            > > stetch. a small diesel and it would be a lovely boat to take
            > > fishing.my only cocern is how would martha's costruction hold up
            to
            > > trailering. at 8' 4" beam is no problem. would sheathing the
            hull in
            > > glass help her hod up better for road travel.
            > >
            >
            i'm in central ohio. i hope to buy the plans with in a year and
            start my build as soon as i clear some current finacial problems.
            rest assured that when i start i'll post lots of pics
          • Rob Rohde-Szudy
            I m really glad you came to that conclusion! And you re right to worry about the hull holding up to trailering. I think trailering favors rather light and
            Message 5 of 5 , Jun 12, 2006
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              I'm really glad you came to that conclusion! And you're right to worry about the hull holding up to trailering. I think trailering favors rather light and small hulls, plywood over timber. The better you seal it, the less it will suffer from the high "winds" in must endure every time you go somewhere. Each trip involves 60 mph winds, after all! You'd think that was a lot if you were standing in one place. I question how well one can tow something the size of Martha Green, really. You can't build that hull in plywood, so you'd probably have to strip plank and glass it, which might provide a some savings in hull weight. How much I don't know. You'll want to watch the engine weight, since some of the old thumpers are whopping heavy. And wind resistance is going to be a big deal on the road with something that big, especially with the pilothouse. Like dragging a parachute! You'll need a big V-8 truck and it'll suck down fuel most terribly. It impacts any long trips you might
              want to make if you're never getting into double digit fuel economy numbers. And of course you'll need a big dual axle trailer with brakes that get wet every time you launch it, and therefore need lots of mainenance. It's a very expensive proposition.

              Sorry to be a doomsayer, but there really are a lot of disadvantages to such a large boat, especially on a trailer. I'd always advise trying to figure out a way to use a smaller boat first. Even if you do build the big one, you'll still use a smaller boat a LOT. Probably a lot more than the big one, since it's cheaper and easier (and quicker) to use.

              --Rob


              3a. you guys are right
              Posted by: "mike" circvildawg@... circvildawg
              Date: Wed Jun 7, 2006 6:26 pm (PDT)

              yea i finally come to my senses. i feel that i still would like to
              build a martha green but keep her exactly as drawn, maybe a 10%
              stetch. a small diesel and it would be a lovely boat to take
              fishing.my only cocern is how would martha's costruction hold up to
              trailering. at 8' 4" beam is no problem. would sheathing the hull in
              glass help her hod up better for road travel.


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