Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: Opposition of 433 Eros and the solar parallax

Expand Messages
  • Steven
    I looked into the circumstances of Eros apparition and selected three times at which simultaneous photographs of Eros may be attempted. This selection was
    Message 1 of 28 , Dec 29, 2011
      I looked into the circumstances of Eros' apparition and selected three times at which simultaneous photographs of Eros may be attempted. This selection was done by looking at images of earth as seen from Eros:

      http://www.transitofvenus.nl/images/Jan31_07UT-small.png
      http://www.transitofvenus.nl/images/Jan31_18UT-small.png
      http://www.transitofvenus.nl/images/Jan31_23UT-small.png

      (In the images, the night side of earth has been left light for clarity, whereas the day side has been made darker)
      Every time, at least two widely separated populated areas had to be in view as to create suitable baselines for the parallax measurements. The selected times are:

      Jan 30 - Feb 1, 07:00 UT: North and South America
      Jan 30 - Feb 1, 18:00 UT: India (Asia actually) and Australia
      Jan 30 - Feb 1, 23:00 UT: Europe, India, Africa

      Comments on the selected dates is very welcome!

      January 1 there will be a call for participation on http://www.transitofvenus.nl, and (hopefully) also a main page with background information and instructions for photographing Eros and submitting your observations.

      Steven

      --- In Astronomy_Activities_2009@yahoogroups.com, "C B" <chander.devgun@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hello all,I have created a form for putting in the details for all who
      > have shown interest from India to observe and photograph the
      > opposition.please click the following link and submit your details:
      > https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dEJUeVAtYnJHMU1TNnp\
      > JOGlkczBqR2c6MQ
      > <https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dEJUeVAtYnJHMU1TNn\
      > pJOGlkczBqR2c6MQ>
      > Regards
      > C B Devgun
      > PresidentScience Popularisation Association of Communicators and
      > EducatorsNational Coordinator, India, World Space Week
      > chander.devgun@... <mailto:chander.devgun@...>
      > +919810226297, +919250901015
      >
      > CONFIDENTIALITY INFORMATION AND DISCLAIMER
      > "This e-mail message may contain confidential, proprietary or legally
      > privileged information. It should not be accessed by anyone who is not
      > the original intended recipient. If you have erroneously received this
      > message, please delete it immediately and notify the sender. The
      > recipient acknowledges that SCIENCE POPULARISATION ASSOCIATION OF
      > COMMUNICATORS AND EDUCATORS (SPACE Group), is unable to exercise control
      > or ensure or guarantee the integrity of/over the contents of the
      > information contained in e-mail transmissions and further acknowledges
      > that any views expressed in this message are those of the individual
      > sender and no binding nature of the message shall be implied or assumed
      > unless the sender does so expressly with due authority of SPACE. Before
      > opening any attachments please check them for viruses and defects."
      >
      > --- In Astronomy_Activities_2009@yahoogroups.com, taralaya BASE
      > <taralaya89@> wrote:
      > >
      > > This is very useful. We will plan the observations accordingly
      > > thanks
      > > Shylaja
      > >
      > > Â
      > > Jawaharlal Nehru Planetarium
      > > Bangalore Association for Science Education
      > > Sri T. Chowdaiah Road, High Grounds
      > > Bangalore 560 001
      > > www.taralaya.org
      > > tel/fax 91-080-2226 6084
      > > 91-080-2220 3234
      > >
      > >
      > > ________________________________
      > > From: Steven stevenvanroode@
      > > To: Astronomy_Activities_2009@yahoogroups.com
      > > Sent: Tuesday, 20 December 2011 8:48 PM
      > > Subject: [Astronomy_Activities_2009] Re: Opposition of 433 Eros and
      > the solar parallax
      > >
      > >
      > > Â
      > > I also have a draft finder chart:
      > http://www.transitofvenus.nl/images/eros2012-chart.png
      > >
      > > The numbers next to stars are referring to HIP. The chart is taken
      > from José Torres' TriAtlas
      > (http://www.uv.es/jrtorres/triatlas.html), the positions of Eros between
      > January 30 11 UT and February 1 11 UT are computed with JPL Horizon
      > website (http://ssd.jpl.nasa.gov/horizons.cgi). The dotted circle
      > indicates a field of view of 1.25 degrees.
      > >
      > > It's only a quick draft. Perhaps the entire path of Eros along the
      > chart should be drawn, and the dates indicated by ticks instead of dots.
      > If you have any other suggestions, let me know, and I will incorporate
      > them in the map.
      > >
      > > Steven van Roode
      > > www.transitofvenus.nl
      > > info@
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • C B
      Dear Steven, We are ready to go ahead, i will mail to you re some details soon. Regards C B Devgun President Science Popularisation Association of
      Message 2 of 28 , Dec 30, 2011
        Dear Steven,
        We are ready to go ahead, i will mail to you re some details soon.

        Regards
        C B Devgun
        President
        Science Popularisation Association of Communicators and Educators
        National Coordinator, India, World Space Week
        chander.devgun@...
        +919810226297, +919250901015


        --- In Astronomy_Activities_2009@yahoogroups.com, "Steven" <stevenvanroode@...> wrote:
        >
        > I looked into the circumstances of Eros' apparition and selected three times at which simultaneous photographs of Eros may be attempted. This selection was done by looking at images of earth as seen from Eros:
        >
        > http://www.transitofvenus.nl/images/Jan31_07UT-small.png
        > http://www.transitofvenus.nl/images/Jan31_18UT-small.png
        > http://www.transitofvenus.nl/images/Jan31_23UT-small.png
        >
        > (In the images, the night side of earth has been left light for clarity, whereas the day side has been made darker)
        > Every time, at least two widely separated populated areas had to be in view as to create suitable baselines for the parallax measurements. The selected times are:
        >
        > Jan 30 - Feb 1, 07:00 UT: North and South America
        > Jan 30 - Feb 1, 18:00 UT: India (Asia actually) and Australia
        > Jan 30 - Feb 1, 23:00 UT: Europe, India, Africa
        >
        > Comments on the selected dates is very welcome!
        >
        > January 1 there will be a call for participation on http://www.transitofvenus.nl, and (hopefully) also a main page with background information and instructions for photographing Eros and submitting your observations.
        >
        > Steven
        >
        > --- In Astronomy_Activities_2009@yahoogroups.com, "C B" <chander.devgun@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Hello all,I have created a form for putting in the details for all who
        > > have shown interest from India to observe and photograph the
        > > opposition.please click the following link and submit your details:
        > > https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dEJUeVAtYnJHMU1TNnp\
        > > JOGlkczBqR2c6MQ
        > > <https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dEJUeVAtYnJHMU1TNn\
        > > pJOGlkczBqR2c6MQ>
        > > Regards
        > > C B Devgun
        > > PresidentScience Popularisation Association of Communicators and
        > > EducatorsNational Coordinator, India, World Space Week
        > > chander.devgun@ <mailto:chander.devgun@>
        > > +919810226297, +919250901015
        > >
        > > CONFIDENTIALITY INFORMATION AND DISCLAIMER
        > > "This e-mail message may contain confidential, proprietary or legally
        > > privileged information. It should not be accessed by anyone who is not
        > > the original intended recipient. If you have erroneously received this
        > > message, please delete it immediately and notify the sender. The
        > > recipient acknowledges that SCIENCE POPULARISATION ASSOCIATION OF
        > > COMMUNICATORS AND EDUCATORS (SPACE Group), is unable to exercise control
        > > or ensure or guarantee the integrity of/over the contents of the
        > > information contained in e-mail transmissions and further acknowledges
        > > that any views expressed in this message are those of the individual
        > > sender and no binding nature of the message shall be implied or assumed
        > > unless the sender does so expressly with due authority of SPACE. Before
        > > opening any attachments please check them for viruses and defects."
        > >
        > > --- In Astronomy_Activities_2009@yahoogroups.com, taralaya BASE
        > > <taralaya89@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > This is very useful. We will plan the observations accordingly
        > > > thanks
        > > > Shylaja
        > > >
        > > > Â
        > > > Jawaharlal Nehru Planetarium
        > > > Bangalore Association for Science Education
        > > > Sri T. Chowdaiah Road, High Grounds
        > > > Bangalore 560 001
        > > > www.taralaya.org
        > > > tel/fax 91-080-2226 6084
        > > > 91-080-2220 3234
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > ________________________________
        > > > From: Steven stevenvanroode@
        > > > To: Astronomy_Activities_2009@yahoogroups.com
        > > > Sent: Tuesday, 20 December 2011 8:48 PM
        > > > Subject: [Astronomy_Activities_2009] Re: Opposition of 433 Eros and
        > > the solar parallax
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > Â
        > > > I also have a draft finder chart:
        > > http://www.transitofvenus.nl/images/eros2012-chart.png
        > > >
        > > > The numbers next to stars are referring to HIP. The chart is taken
        > > from José Torres' TriAtlas
        > > (http://www.uv.es/jrtorres/triatlas.html), the positions of Eros between
        > > January 30 11 UT and February 1 11 UT are computed with JPL Horizon
        > > website (http://ssd.jpl.nasa.gov/horizons.cgi). The dotted circle
        > > indicates a field of view of 1.25 degrees.
        > > >
        > > > It's only a quick draft. Perhaps the entire path of Eros along the
        > > chart should be drawn, and the dates indicated by ticks instead of dots.
        > > If you have any other suggestions, let me know, and I will incorporate
        > > them in the map.
        > > >
        > > > Steven van Roode
        > > > www.transitofvenus.nl
        > > > info@
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        >
      • Amar A. Sharma
        Hello Steven, I am in Bangalore (+13*N and 77.5E) and have a SBIG ST-8XME CCD camera recently bought. Even though I am still in its learning process (thanks to
        Message 3 of 28 , Dec 31, 2011
          Hello Steven,

          I am in Bangalore (+13*N and 77.5E) and have a SBIG ST-8XME CCD camera recently bought. Even though I am still in its learning process (thanks to number of cloudy days into the winter, could not fruitfully use it) I wish to employ it for some scientific use.

          I will have to see which telescope it would be, but mostly a 8" f/5 on EQ6 Pro mount. Have already filled the participation form.

          Willing to participate, and attempt some astrometry. I can share the FITS file with all, which should be of great use, and those knowing astrometry, photometry etc could use it well. Thanks, Amar.

          PS - its Jan 1, so looking forward for the update

          --- In Astronomy_Activities_2009@yahoogroups.com, "Steven" <stevenvanroode@...> wrote:
          >
          > January 1 there will be a call for participation on http://www.transitofvenus.nl, and (hopefully) also a main page with background information and instructions for photographing Eros and submitting your observations.
          >
          > Steven
        • dfischer@astro.uni-bonn.de
          ... Here it is: http://transitofvenus.nl/wp/2012/01/01/eros-and-the-solar-parallax Daniel (from Germany, also promoting the idea there)
          Message 4 of 28 , Jan 1, 2012
            > PS - its Jan 1, so looking forward for the update

            Here it is:
            http://transitofvenus.nl/wp/2012/01/01/eros-and-the-solar-parallax

            Daniel (from Germany, also promoting the idea there)
          • Steven
            Thanks, Daniel! Stay tuned for a page with detailed instructions (including how to do the astrometry yourself very easily). I m working hard to get this page
            Message 5 of 28 , Jan 1, 2012
              Thanks, Daniel!

              Stay tuned for a page with detailed instructions (including how to do the astrometry yourself very easily). I'm working hard to get this page ready and online as soon as possible – hopefully today, otherwise tomorrow. There should be sufficient time for everyone to practise with taking pictures of Eros and rehearse doing the astrometry, before we get to the real thing on January 30, 31 and February 1.

              I couldn't envision a better way to start 2012. Wishing you all a Happy New year!

              Steven van Roode
              www.transitofvenus.nl
              info@...

              --- In Astronomy_Activities_2009@yahoogroups.com, dfischer@... wrote:
              >
              > > PS - its Jan 1, so looking forward for the update
              >
              > Here it is:
              > http://transitofvenus.nl/wp/2012/01/01/eros-and-the-solar-parallax
              >
              > Daniel (from Germany, also promoting the idea there)
              >
            • Steven
              Detailed instructions to photograph Eros and process your pictures are now online! See
              Message 6 of 28 , Jan 1, 2012
                Detailed instructions to photograph Eros and process your pictures are now online! See http://transitofvenus.nl/wp/getting-involved/eros-and-the-solar-parallax/

                Make sure to start early with practising, so you're all set on January 30 to February 1!

                Steven

                --- In Astronomy_Activities_2009@yahoogroups.com, "Steven" <stevenvanroode@...> wrote:
                >
                > Thanks, Daniel!
                >
                > Stay tuned for a page with detailed instructions (including how to do the astrometry yourself very easily). I'm working hard to get this page ready and online as soon as possible – hopefully today, otherwise tomorrow. There should be sufficient time for everyone to practise with taking pictures of Eros and rehearse doing the astrometry, before we get to the real thing on January 30, 31 and February 1.
                >
                > I couldn't envision a better way to start 2012. Wishing you all a Happy New year!
                >
                > Steven van Roode
                > www.transitofvenus.nl
                > info@...
                >
                > --- In Astronomy_Activities_2009@yahoogroups.com, dfischer@ wrote:
                > >
                > > > PS - its Jan 1, so looking forward for the update
                > >
                > > Here it is:
                > > http://transitofvenus.nl/wp/2012/01/01/eros-and-the-solar-parallax
                > >
                > > Daniel (from Germany, also promoting the idea there)
                > >
                >
              • dfischer@astro.uni-bonn.de
                Hi Steven (and potential participants in India & elsewhere), ... The key question (to me) is: How big will the parallax effect be, i.e. how large a telescope
                Message 7 of 28 , Jan 1, 2012
                  Hi Steven (and potential participants in India & elsewhere),

                  > Stay tuned for a page with detailed instructions (including how to do the
                  > astrometry yourself very easily).

                  The key question (to me) is: How big will the parallax effect be, i.e. how
                  large a telescope does one need to detect it - and would even a camera
                  with a telephoto lens on a tripod suffice (as it did for getting a 10% AU
                  out of the last ToV)? Also important: How quickly does Eros move in the
                  sky, i.e. how precisely do you have to hit the target date & time? Could
                  calculate all this myself, but I reckon you already did. :-)

                  > There should be sufficient time for everyone to practise with taking
                  > pictures of Eros and rehearse doing the astrometry, before we get to the
                  > real thing on January 30, 31 and February 1.

                  I would recommend a *long`* list of dates & times between Jan. 15 and Feb.
                  5 - weather is a major problem in many parts of the world, so everyone
                  needs a *lot* of chances!

                  > I couldn't envision a better way to start 2012.

                  That's for sure, and I'll do *all* I can to support this marvellous project!

                  > Wishing you all a Happy New year!

                  Same from me!

                  Daniel in Germany
                • Steven van Roode
                  Hi Daniel, Two of your questions are answered in the article at http://transitofvenus.nl/wp/getting-involved/eros-and-the-solar-parallax/: the maximum amount
                  Message 8 of 28 , Jan 2, 2012
                    Hi Daniel,

                    Two of your questions are answered in the article at http://transitofvenus.nl/wp/getting-involved/eros-and-the-solar-parallax/: the maximum amount of parallax will be 98", and Eros will move with nearly 2.8" per minute. According to Michael Richmond it's possible to photograph Eros with a telephoto lens, but I think it would be best if it's on a guided mount, because exposure times are quite long. The main concern will be to have at least 10 to 20 stars (and Eros) visible on your pictures, so astrometry.net can identify the stars and the picture can be measured in ds9.

                    There's nothing wrong to extend the observing period a bit as long as the photographed are taken at one of the three times (7 UT, 18 UT or 23 UT), but we need multiple exposures from different locations each night to measure the parallax of Eros.

                    Steven

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Ajay Talwar
                    Hello Steven, How far in time can the sets of photograph be? Do the photographs have to shot at the same time - to the second, minute, hour or they could be on
                    Message 9 of 28 , Jan 2, 2012
                      Hello Steven,

                      How far in time can the sets of photograph be? Do the photographs have to shot at the same time - to the second, minute, hour or they could be on the same night.

                      The motion of Eros at opposition would be quick.

                      Ajay Talwar
                      (who wants to enrol for the project)




                      >________________________________
                      > From: Steven van Roode <stevenvanroode@...>
                      >To: "Astronomy_Activities_2009@yahoogroups.com" <Astronomy_Activities_2009@yahoogroups.com>
                      >Sent: Monday, January 2, 2012 8:08 PM
                      >Subject: [Astronomy_Activities_2009] Re: Opposition of 433 Eros and the solar parallax
                      >
                      >Hi Daniel,
                      >
                      >Two of your questions are answered in the article at http://transitofvenus.nl/wp/getting-involved/eros-and-the-solar-parallax/: the maximum amount of parallax will be 98", and Eros will move with nearly 2.8" per minute. According to Michael Richmond it's possible to photograph Eros with a telephoto lens, but I think it would be best if it's on a guided mount, because exposure times are quite long. The main concern will be to have at least 10 to 20 stars (and Eros) visible on your pictures, so astrometry.net can identify the stars and the picture can be measured in ds9.
                      >
                      >There's nothing wrong to extend the observing period a bit as long as the photographed are taken at one of the three times (7 UT, 18 UT or 23 UT), but we need multiple exposures from different locations each night to measure the parallax of Eros.
                      >
                      >Steven
                      >
                      >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >------------------------------------
                      >
                      >Yahoo! Groups Links
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • dfischer@astro.uni-bonn.de
                      Hi Steven, ... How badly trailed can the Eros & star images be for the software to still get something useful out of an image? And can it handle deliberately
                      Message 10 of 28 , Jan 2, 2012
                        Hi Steven,


                        > According to Michael Richmond it's possible to photograph
                        > Eros with a telephoto lens, but I think it would be best if it's on a
                        > guided mount, because exposure times are quite long. The main concern will
                        > be to have at least 10 to 20 stars (and Eros) visible on your pictures, so
                        > astrometry.net can identify the stars and the picture can be measured in
                        > ds9.

                        How badly trailed can the Eros & star images be for the software to still
                        get something useful out of an image? And can it handle deliberately
                        produced star trail images taken w/o any mount (measuring both beginning
                        and end of the trails)?

                        > There's nothing wrong to extend the observing period a bit as long as the
                        > photographed are taken at one of the three times (7 UT, 18 UT or 23 UT),
                        > but we need multiple exposures from different locations each night to
                        > measure the parallax of Eros.

                        Perhaps a full week around perigee should be defined as the main observing
                        period: that would deliver 21 possibilities for pairs (including 7 for
                        Europe vs. India at 23 UTC) - one of so many *should* work ... Eros will
                        be constant at 8.6 mag. during that interval, residing in Sextans.


                        Regards,

                        Dan
                      • Steven
                        Which images can still be analysed by astrometry.net I don t know. I should ask Michael. But there s of course a way to find out: try yo upload some sky images
                        Message 11 of 28 , Jan 3, 2012
                          Which images can still be analysed by astrometry.net I don't know. I should ask Michael. But there's of course a way to find out: try yo upload some sky images with star trails and see what astrometry.net makes of it.

                          A week around perigee is a good idea, but please remember that for parallax measurements only simultaneous images taken on the same night can be matched. So a 23 UT image of January 31 from India can't be matched with a 23 UT image of February 1 from Europe. Eros' movement in the sky is too large for that (actually, it's hourly movement already exceeds the maximum amount of parallax).

                          I will update the website, so that the observing period is a week around perigee.

                          Steven

                          --- In Astronomy_Activities_2009@yahoogroups.com, dfischer@... wrote:
                          >
                          > Hi Steven,
                          >
                          >
                          > > According to Michael Richmond it's possible to photograph
                          > > Eros with a telephoto lens, but I think it would be best if it's on a
                          > > guided mount, because exposure times are quite long. The main concern will
                          > > be to have at least 10 to 20 stars (and Eros) visible on your pictures, so
                          > > astrometry.net can identify the stars and the picture can be measured in
                          > > ds9.
                          >
                          > How badly trailed can the Eros & star images be for the software to still
                          > get something useful out of an image? And can it handle deliberately
                          > produced star trail images taken w/o any mount (measuring both beginning
                          > and end of the trails)?
                          >
                          > > There's nothing wrong to extend the observing period a bit as long as the
                          > > photographed are taken at one of the three times (7 UT, 18 UT or 23 UT),
                          > > but we need multiple exposures from different locations each night to
                          > > measure the parallax of Eros.
                          >
                          > Perhaps a full week around perigee should be defined as the main observing
                          > period: that would deliver 21 possibilities for pairs (including 7 for
                          > Europe vs. India at 23 UTC) - one of so many *should* work ... Eros will
                          > be constant at 8.6 mag. during that interval, residing in Sextans.
                          >
                          >
                          > Regards,
                          >
                          > Dan
                          >
                        • Steven
                          The pictures should preferably be taken to the second. The movement of Eros is about 2.8 per minute, making Eros traverse a distance across the sky equivalent
                          Message 12 of 28 , Jan 3, 2012
                            The pictures should preferably be taken to the second. The movement of Eros is about 2.8" per minute, making Eros traverse a distance across the sky equivalent to its maximum amount of parallax in half an hour.

                            Taking pictures to the second will take some practise, as the images will have long exposures. As Michael explains on the website, the time of your image is the middle of your exposure. So, for example, if you're using an exposure of 30 s, and would like to take the picture at 23 UT, you start the exposure at 22:59:45 UT and end the exposure at 23:00:15 UT.

                            Steven

                            --- In Astronomy_Activities_2009@yahoogroups.com, Ajay Talwar <ajaytalwar80@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Hello Steven,
                            >
                            > How far in time can the sets of photograph be? Do the photographs have to shot at the same time - to the second, minute, hour or they could be on the same night.
                            >
                            > The motion of Eros at opposition would be quick.
                            >
                            > Ajay Talwar
                            > (who wants to enrol for the project)
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > >________________________________
                            > > From: Steven van Roode <stevenvanroode@...>
                            > >To: "Astronomy_Activities_2009@yahoogroups.com" <Astronomy_Activities_2009@yahoogroups.com>
                            > >Sent: Monday, January 2, 2012 8:08 PM
                            > >Subject: [Astronomy_Activities_2009] Re: Opposition of 433 Eros and the solar parallax
                            > >
                            > >Hi Daniel,
                            > >
                            > >Two of your questions are answered in the article at http://transitofvenus.nl/wp/getting-involved/eros-and-the-solar-parallax/: the maximum amount of parallax will be 98", and Eros will move with nearly 2.8" per minute. According to Michael Richmond it's possible to photograph Eros with a telephoto lens, but I think it would be best if it's on a guided mount, because exposure times are quite long. The main concern will be to have at least 10 to 20 stars (and Eros) visible on your pictures, so astrometry.net can identify the stars and the picture can be measured in ds9.
                            > >
                            > >There's nothing wrong to extend the observing period a bit as long as the photographed are taken at one of the three times (7 UT, 18 UT or 23 UT), but we need multiple exposures from different locations each night to measure the parallax of Eros.
                            > >
                            > >Steven
                            > >
                            > >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >------------------------------------
                            > >
                            > >Yahoo! Groups Links
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            >
                            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            >
                          • Amar A. Sharma
                            Hello Steven, Only 2 nights remain for the asteroid event on 31st. Any updates? Looking forward to make the best use of this. I personally hope I can stand by
                            Message 13 of 28 , Jan 29, 2012
                              Hello Steven,

                              Only 2 nights remain for the asteroid event on 31st. Any updates? Looking forward to make the best use of this.

                              I personally hope I can stand by with my CCD and dedicate a full night for imaging this. Thanks, Amar.

                              --- In Astronomy_Activities_2009@yahoogroups.com, "Steven" <stevenvanroode@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > I will update the website, so that the observing period is a week around perigee.
                            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.