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Re: [Astronomy_Activities_2009] Sky Events In May'08

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  • arp@iucaa.ernet.in
    I echo Ajay s view point on Astronomy Day / Astronomy Week I would also like to point out that it would be nice if this day / week is celebrated all the
    Message 1 of 5 , May 1, 2008
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      I echo Ajay's view point on Astronomy Day / Astronomy Week

      I would also like to point out that it would be nice if this day / week is
      celebrated all the amateur astronomer all over India.

      Let us put this in to categories -1) direct public outreach and 2)
      dedicated amateur activity.

      Instead of doing it on a fix date how about weekends.

      The outreach could be celebrated on the first weekend that comes 3 days
      after diwali.

      The logic and experience tells us that by and large the public is happy
      looking at the moon and the moon is just at about right position. Also
      the moon sets before the midnight so if some groups wants to have
      overnight star party they can do that too. This can go on for a week or
      what ever.

      For public star parties I find that taking people to some place away from
      the city for a few hours and bring them home by 11:30 p.m. works best.

      The first timers can’t remain awake beyond the midnight and if they do
      remain then by and large they become nuisance if you are planning some
      serious stuff – better they go home and we continue. From the purely
      financial considerations, here the hiring of buses etc are from midnight
      to midnight so if we hire a bus from 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. we pay for two days
      whereas our use is only one night. If it is not an overnight affair we do
      not worry too much about where we park but if it is overnight then
      security becomes (and should become) major issue – in particular when
      there are ladies with the group.

      Serious Amateur Day
      We could time dedicated amateur activity on close to no moon weekend in
      March – in tune with messier marathon. This is a proper full night’s
      programme. Here we do not entertain onlookers. We take this as a serious
      matter.


      Arvind Paranjpye


      > Hello Fellow Astronuts,
      >  
      > Here are some of my thoughts and astronomy event compilation in May, 2008.
      >  
      >             May, 2008 hosts the ‘Astronomy Week’ and the
      > ‘Astronomy Day’ on Saturday the 10th. The dates for the events are
      > decided by the Astronomical League, USA.
      > http://www.astroleague.org/al/astroday/astroday.htmlThe theme of Astronomy
      > Day is "Bringing Astronomy to the People,", and it seems similar to the
      > International Sidewalk Astronomy Day which occurred a few days back. If
      > you have planned an astronomy public event, observation, or any other
      > activity in your city, you could list your astronomy event on their
      > website
      > http://www.astroleague.org/al/general/news/request.html
      >  
      >             The Astronomy week is celebrated in America because
      > it fits America’s weather and calendar. I feel May is not a good month
      > in India to celebrate the Astronomy Day. For one, the night hours are very
      > short, twilight lingers on till after 8 pm in the northern India. You get
      > approximately 7.5 hours of true night time, between the astronomical
      > twilight. The season is hot, dusty and cloudy. It is also crop cutting
      > season, which produces more dust and muck in the air, in places where
      > amateur astronomers frequent for their Saturday field trips. I feel a week
      > in the months of November or February is much better suited in our
      > tropical and monsoon climate. You get longer night time, the temperatures
      > are lenient, the slight cold keeps the clouds away and monsoon is the
      > least active in these months. Anyway we never get snow or sub-zero
      > temperatures like in the America to be forced to celebrate Astronomy Day
      > in early May.
      >  
      >             The New Moon falls on 5th May and it coincides with
      > the peak of Eta Aquarids. A fine, rich stream associated with Comet
      > Halley, (Orionids in October is also associated with the same comet) but
      > one visible for only a few hours before dawn, essentially from tropical
      > and southern hemisphere sites, good for us! The shower produces fast and
      > often bright meteors, and many events leave glowing persistent trains
      > after them. η-Aquariids tend to have very long paths. A relatively broad
      > maximum, usually occurs in early May. ZHRs are generally above 30 between
      > about May 3 — 10, and that the peak rates appear to be variable on a
      > roughly 12-year timescale. The next highest rates should fall towards 2008
      > — 2010, if this Jupiter-influenced cycle is borne-out, thus ZHRs should
      > be around 70 or more in 2008, according to this idea. The unexpectedly
      > strong Orionid return of 2006 October adds a degree of extra uncertainty
      > over what may be
      > possible from this shower too, and new Moon on May 5 makes this a
      > perfect year for checking. http://www.imo.net/calendar/2008
      >  
      >             6th May, tuesday evening, a 24 hour old Moon comes
      > within 6° of Mercury. The next evening too the pair can be seen about 8°
      > apart. Mercury itself reaches greatest elongation east, a week later on
      > 14th May.
      >  
      >             10th May, Saturday will see a lot of telescopes out
      > in the evening all over India. Mars is being occulted by Moon. The event
      > is specially suited for India with both acts, disappearance and appearance
      > entirely visible throughout India. Beware! the size of Mars has gone very
      > small since its opposition(16”), and now its only 5.5”.  The actual
      > immersion and emersion will last for approximately 6-8 seconds according
      > to the location. Mars is 91% lit at this time and will show a gibbous
      > phase. Check out this page by Mr. Arvind Paranjpye for more details
      > http://www.iucaa.ernet.in/~scipop/Sky/mars_occultation08.htm
      > Mars later goes right in the middle of the Beehive cluster on 23rd May to
      > brighten up the cluster. It stays in the cluster just 1 night!
      >  
      >             Uranus will be better placed for viewing at the end
      > of May, then it could be observed for a short while before the morning
      > twilight starts. The equinox of the rolling planet Uranus occurred on 7th
      > December 2007. Its an event that occurs in 42 years. In the modern
      > telescope era the event has just occurred for the first time, last one
      > being in 1965. What’s in it for the Amateurs? Well, you can see the
      > shadows of Uranian moons falling on the planet. Would You dare to try and
      > see the shadow?
      > http://www.apl.ucl.ac.uk/iopw/uworkshop_060905.pdf
      >  
      >             C/2007 W1 ( Boattini ) is brightening much faster
      > than expected. It is already 7.7 mag. The comet is visible in Hydra. It
      > will pass 0.85 A.U. from the sun in late June, and it may reach up to 4.5
      > mag. In the Northern Hemipshere, it is observable until around May 25,
      > when the comet will be 6 mag. It will be unobservable for one and a half
      > month around the perihelion passage. But it will appear in the morning sky
      > again at 5.5 mag in early July, then it keeps observable after that while
      > the comet is fading gradually. Ephemeris for the come is available here
      > http://www.cfa.harvard.edu/iau/Ephemerides/Comets/2007W1_1.html
      >  
      >             C/2008 C1 ( Chen-Gao ) is a new bright comet
      > discovered by two Chinese amateurs. The comet is visible evenings in Orion
      > constellation. Now it is very bright as 10.0 mag. Diffuse object with a
      > weak condensation. It will be as bright as 10 mag in May. In the Northern
      > Hemisphere, it will be observable in the evening sky until mid May, but
      > then it moves southwards. In the Southern Hemisphere, it keeps observable
      > until it fades out. Ephemeris for the comet is available here
      > http://www.cfa.harvard.edu/iau/Ephemerides/Comets/2008C1_1.html
      >  
      > For current comet information visit
      > http://www.aerith.net/comet/weekly/current.html
      >  
      > Ajay Talwar
      >  
      > This is a compilation of some of the major astronomy events in May 2008,
      > it has been compiled using various internet sources, books and astronomy
      > software. It is not intended to be complete in all respects, but just a
      > primer of what’s up this month.
      >
      >
      > ____________________________________________________________________________________
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      > know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now.
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    • Chander Devgun
      In india we dont have any astronomy day/week till now and usually go by celebrating either astronomy day/week or space week or sidewalk astronomy night. where
      Message 2 of 5 , May 1, 2008
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        In india we dont have any astronomy day/week till now and usually go
        by celebrating either astronomy day/week or space week or sidewalk
        astronomy night. where as through out the year we have so many
        activities and public watches going on.
        its a nice idea from ajay and arvind about a particualr day/week
        celebrated for amateur astronomy. But i differ here re the day for
        public and for serious amateurs. I beleive that serious amateurs are
        those who take telescope to public and show them the skies with
        enthusiam!!!!!!! A single day in march when skies are clear can be
        the day for astronomy in india..

        regards
        CB

        --- In Astronomy_Activities_2009@yahoogroups.com, arp@... wrote:
        >
        > I echo Ajay's view point on Astronomy Day / Astronomy Week
        >
        > I would also like to point out that it would be nice if this day /
        week is
        > celebrated all the amateur astronomer all over India.
        >
        > Let us put this in to categories -1) direct public outreach and 2)
        > dedicated amateur activity.
        >
        > Instead of doing it on a fix date how about weekends.
        >
        > The outreach could be celebrated on the first weekend that comes 3
        days
        > after diwali.
        >
        > The logic and experience tells us that by and large the public is
        happy
        > looking at the moon and the moon is just at about right position.
        Also
        > the moon sets before the midnight so if some groups wants to have
        > overnight star party they can do that too. This can go on for a
        week or
        > what ever.
        >
        > For public star parties I find that taking people to some place
        away from
        > the city for a few hours and bring them home by 11:30 p.m. works
        best.
        >
        > The first timers can't remain awake beyond the midnight and if they
        do
        > remain then by and large they become nuisance if you are planning
        some
        > serious stuff – better they go home and we continue. From the
        purely
        > financial considerations, here the hiring of buses etc are from
        midnight
        > to midnight so if we hire a bus from 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. we pay for
        two days
        > whereas our use is only one night. If it is not an overnight
        affair we do
        > not worry too much about where we park but if it is overnight then
        > security becomes (and should become) major issue – in particular
        when
        > there are ladies with the group.
        >
        > Serious Amateur Day
        > We could time dedicated amateur activity on close to no moon
        weekend in
        > March – in tune with messier marathon. This is a proper full
        night's
        > programme. Here we do not entertain onlookers. We take this as a
        serious
        > matter.
        >
        >
        > Arvind Paranjpye
        >
        >
        > > Hello Fellow Astronuts,
        > >  
        > > Here are some of my thoughts and astronomy event compilation in
        May, 2008.
        > >  
        > >             May, 2008 hosts the ‘Astronomy Week’
        and the
        > > ‘Astronomy Day’ on Saturday the 10th. The dates for the
        events are
        > > decided by the Astronomical League, USA.
        > > http://www.astroleague.org/al/astroday/astroday.htmlThe theme of
        Astronomy
        > > Day is "Bringing Astronomy to the People,", and it seems similar
        to the
        > > International Sidewalk Astronomy Day which occurred a few days
        back. If
        > > you have planned an astronomy public event, observation, or any
        other
        > > activity in your city, you could list your astronomy event on
        their
        > > website
        > > http://www.astroleague.org/al/general/news/request.html
        > >  
        > >             The Astronomy week is celebrated in
        America because
        > > it fits America’s weather and calendar. I feel May is not a
        good month
        > > in India to celebrate the Astronomy Day. For one, the night hours
        are very
        > > short, twilight lingers on till after 8 pm in the northern India.
        You get
        > > approximately 7.5 hours of true night time, between the
        astronomical
        > > twilight. The season is hot, dusty and cloudy. It is also crop
        cutting
        > > season, which produces more dust and muck in the air, in places
        where
        > > amateur astronomers frequent for their Saturday field trips. I
        feel a week
        > > in the months of November or February is much better suited in our
        > > tropical and monsoon climate. You get longer night time, the
        temperatures
        > > are lenient, the slight cold keeps the clouds away and monsoon is
        the
        > > least active in these months. Anyway we never get snow or sub-zero
        > > temperatures like in the America to be forced to celebrate
        Astronomy Day
        > > in early May.
        > >  
        > >             The New Moon falls on 5th May and it
        coincides with
        > > the peak of Eta Aquarids. A fine, rich stream associated with
        Comet
        > > Halley, (Orionids in October is also associated with the same
        comet) but
        > > one visible for only a few hours before dawn, essentially from
        tropical
        > > and southern hemisphere sites, good for us! The shower produces
        fast and
        > > often bright meteors, and many events leave glowing persistent
        trains
        > > after them. η-Aquariids tend to have very long paths. A
        relatively broad
        > > maximum, usually occurs in early May. ZHRs are generally above 30
        between
        > > about May 3 â€" 10, and that the peak rates appear to be
        variable on a
        > > roughly 12-year timescale. The next highest rates should fall
        towards 2008
        > > â€" 2010, if this Jupiter-influenced cycle is borne-out, thus
        ZHRs should
        > > be around 70 or more in 2008, according to this idea. The
        unexpectedly
        > > strong Orionid return of 2006 October adds a degree of extra
        uncertainty
        > > over what may be
        > > possible from this shower too, and new Moon on May 5 makes this
        a
        > > perfect year for checking. http://www.imo.net/calendar/2008
        > >  
        > >             6th May, tuesday evening, a 24 hour old
        Moon comes
        > > within 6° of Mercury. The next evening too the pair can be seen
        about 8°
        > > apart. Mercury itself reaches greatest elongation east, a week
        later on
        > > 14th May.
        > >  
        > >             10th May, Saturday will see a lot of
        telescopes out
        > > in the evening all over India. Mars is being occulted by Moon.
        The event
        > > is specially suited for India with both acts, disappearance and
        appearance
        > > entirely visible throughout India. Beware! the size of Mars has
        gone very
        > > small since its opposition(16”), and now its only 5.5”.  The
        actual
        > > immersion and emersion will last for approximately 6-8 seconds
        according
        > > to the location. Mars is 91% lit at this time and will show a
        gibbous
        > > phase. Check out this page by Mr. Arvind Paranjpye for more
        details
        > > http://www.iucaa.ernet.in/~scipop/Sky/mars_occultation08.htm
        > > Mars later goes right in the middle of the Beehive cluster on
        23rd May to
        > > brighten up the cluster. It stays in the cluster just 1 night!
        > >  
        > >             Uranus will be better placed for viewing
        at the end
        > > of May, then it could be observed for a short while before the
        morning
        > > twilight starts. The equinox of the rolling planet Uranus
        occurred on 7th
        > > December 2007. Its an event that occurs in 42 years. In the modern
        > > telescope era the event has just occurred for the first time,
        last one
        > > being in 1965. What’s in it for the Amateurs? Well, you can see
        the
        > > shadows of Uranian moons falling on the planet. Would You dare to
        try and
        > > see the shadow?
        > > http://www.apl.ucl.ac.uk/iopw/uworkshop_060905.pdf
        > >  
        > >             C/2007 W1 ( Boattini ) is brightening much
        faster
        > > than expected. It is already 7.7 mag. The comet is visible in
        Hydra. It
        > > will pass 0.85 A.U. from the sun in late June, and it may reach
        up to 4.5
        > > mag. In the Northern Hemipshere, it is observable until around
        May 25,
        > > when the comet will be 6 mag. It will be unobservable for one and
        a half
        > > month around the perihelion passage. But it will appear in the
        morning sky
        > > again at 5.5 mag in early July, then it keeps observable after
        that while
        > > the comet is fading gradually. Ephemeris for the come is
        available here
        > > http://www.cfa.harvard.edu/iau/Ephemerides/Comets/2007W1_1.html
        > >  
        > >             C/2008 C1 ( Chen-Gao ) is a new bright
        comet
        > > discovered by two Chinese amateurs. The comet is visible evenings
        in Orion
        > > constellation. Now it is very bright as 10.0 mag. Diffuse object
        with a
        > > weak condensation. It will be as bright as 10 mag in May. In the
        Northern
        > > Hemisphere, it will be observable in the evening sky until mid
        May, but
        > > then it moves southwards. In the Southern Hemisphere, it keeps
        observable
        > > until it fades out. Ephemeris for the comet is available here
        > > http://www.cfa.harvard.edu/iau/Ephemerides/Comets/2008C1_1.html
        > >  
        > > For current comet information visit
        > > http://www.aerith.net/comet/weekly/current.html
        > >  
        > > Ajay Talwar
        > >  
        > > This is a compilation of some of the major astronomy events in
        May 2008,
        > > it has been compiled using various internet sources, books and
        astronomy
        > > software. It is not intended to be complete in all respects, but
        just a
        > > primer of what’s up this month.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        ______________________________________________________________________
        ______________
        > > Be a better friend, newshound, and
        > > know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now.
        > > http://mobile.yahoo.com/;_ylt=Ahu06i62sR8HDtDypao8Wcj9tAcJ
        > >
        > > --
        > > This message has been scanned for viruses and
        > > dangerous content by OpenProtect(http://www.openprotect.com), and
        is
        > > believed to be clean.
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
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      • arp@iucaa.ernet.in
        ... No I don t agree with CB on this issue at all. When doing some serious stuff I don t even want a novice around and asking me why magnitude 3 is brighter
        Message 3 of 5 , May 1, 2008
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          > I beleive that serious amateurs are
          > those who take telescope to public and show them the skies with
          > enthusiam!!!!!!! A single day in march when skies are clear can be
          > the day for astronomy in india..

          No I don't agree with CB on this issue at all. When doing some
          serious stuff I don't even want a novice around and asking me
          "why magnitude 3 is brighter than mag 4".

          I am not against taking astronomy to public - I do that day in
          and night out - without charging any money - at different levels.

          But two should be delinked - how we do that is a different
          matter.

          Eg. When some serious chaps in pune busy obsrving meteors -
          some others took the "public" to a far away place than where
          the serious group was.

          But remember what happened during the leonids for observers in Delhi?
          TV guys came and put big flood lights?

          NO - certainly not - mixing two things are out for me

          When you do something for public do it for public - as a matter
          of fact this could be good source of funds for the clubs.

          But when it comes to doing my stuff it's my stuff -

          Arv


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        • Chander Devgun
          Being an amateur does not mean that you shut dowm your self to a novice, we are here bcos some amateur astronomer taught us the intricasies of serious
          Message 4 of 5 , May 1, 2008
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            Being an amateur does not mean that you shut dowm your self to a
            novice, we are here bcos some amateur astronomer taught us the
            intricasies of serious astronomy and we also are doing the same and
            making another generation of new amateur astronomers, "this is my
            stuff atitude" can actually kill the basic driving force inside an
            amateur. Thats what i feel.
            Leonids incident has nothing to do with the astronomy day as that
            happened when media was in its nascent stage and they dint know what
            a light can mean to an amateur. But there are so many incidents in my
            mind when media actually did the same in so many parts of india !!!!!!

            anyways, i still stick to one single astronomy day for amateurs be it
            novice or serious.

            regards
            CB


            --- In Astronomy_Activities_2009@yahoogroups.com, arp@... wrote:
            >
            > > I beleive that serious amateurs are
            > > those who take telescope to public and show them the skies with
            > > enthusiam!!!!!!! A single day in march when skies are clear can be
            > > the day for astronomy in india..
            >
            > No I don't agree with CB on this issue at all. When doing some
            > serious stuff I don't even want a novice around and asking me
            > "why magnitude 3 is brighter than mag 4".
            >
            > I am not against taking astronomy to public - I do that day in
            > and night out - without charging any money - at different levels.
            >
            > But two should be delinked - how we do that is a different
            > matter.
            >
            > Eg. When some serious chaps in pune busy obsrving meteors -
            > some others took the "public" to a far away place than where
            > the serious group was.
            >
            > But remember what happened during the leonids for observers in
            Delhi?
            > TV guys came and put big flood lights?
            >
            > NO - certainly not - mixing two things are out for me
            >
            > When you do something for public do it for public - as a matter
            > of fact this could be good source of funds for the clubs.
            >
            > But when it comes to doing my stuff it's my stuff -
            >
            > Arv
            >
            >
            > --
            > This message has been scanned for viruses and
            > dangerous content by OpenProtect(http://www.openprotect.com), and is
            > believed to be clean.
            >
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