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Re: [Astronomy_Activities_2009] some inQuiry on TSE-09

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  • Ajay Talwar
    Hello Ranjan, I would like to suggest a few projects without using specific costly equipments. 1. You can measure the extent of corona during totality, how far
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 6, 2009
      Hello Ranjan,

      I would like to suggest a few projects without using specific costly equipments.

      1. You can measure the extent of corona during totality, how far does it extend from the sun and in which direction(s). When you extend your hand at arms length your thumbnail measures approx 1 degree, and the fist (roughly 10 degrees, not counting the thumb) we can measure the extent of the corona from the edges. 10 min before totality, a patch can be applied to one eye to get ready for the darkness during totality, and keep the other eye to observe the pre-totality phase. DURING totality, open the closed eye (now more sensitive to faint light of the Corona) and strech our one arm fully towards the sun, then make the measurements with thumb, fingers or the fist. Remember to close the 'pre-totality' eye closed during the totality.

      2. Measure the time: With the help of a clock and just observing we can measure the timings and duration of the solar eclipse from the first contact to the fourth.

      3. Observing the impact on our Biosphere: Since we, in India, will be observing the eclipse a little above the horizon on the east, the event will surely confuse the birds and animals around. It will be like a double sunrise on 22nd July. You can observe their behavior before, during and after the eclipse.

      4. During the three minutes totality, observe the horizon in all directions. When the eclipse is happening near zenith, all round on the horizon you can see sunset hues and colours, this eclipse in India will surely be different.

      5. Observe the approaching lunar shadow. On a cloudless day, to observe the approaching or receding lunar shadow, we should be on an altitude as high as possible and view a plateau region. We want to be on a vantage point (for example khandala ghat), this lets us see till far on the horizon, where we can see the edge of shadows. But in case of a cloudy day or if there are scattered clouds, or in case of misty, hazy atmosphere, the altitude of the clouds will help us, we can already look far. STANDING ON THE GROUND ITSELF WE ARE AT A VANTAGE POINT! Then we don't need a high altitude. You are never clouded out of an eclipse.

      6. As the Sun goes smaller and smaller progressively, the shadows of objects get sharp.

      7. Pinhole images of the eclipse: through the leaves of the trees, one can see beautiful crecents of the solar eclipse, being formed on the ground. The leaves act as pinholes and the ground acts as the image forming plane. The tree pinholes images give us and exact replica and multiple eclipse happening on the ground.

      8. Shadow bands: we see the stars twinkle in the night sky because of the point light passing through our turbulent atmosphere. if the star would have been bright and casting shadows, we would have seen variations in the shadows. when the sun is eclipsed its size reduces, and the shadows are effected by the atmosphere. there are patterns formed on the ground. these are not shadows of any objects, but the shadows of the atmosphere due to turbulance. at some points there is more of sunlight,and at some there is lesser(shadows). due to orientation of the crescent, the shadows are formed in bands, of darker and lighter regions. One can observe them moving in particular direction, and one can report the timing of this event, when did they occur relative to totality, how long did they last, and what was the intensity.

      9. You can keep a record of temperature of the air, water, soil, deeper soil and see how the temperature changes during an eclipse. This does require a reference reading few days before and after the eclipse though.

      Eclipse Chasers Athenaeum is organising such experiments under the leadership of Dr Hari Om Vats of PRL and Dr Jamer R. Huddle of U.S. Naval Academy. Recently Glenn Schneider also proposed a simple photography experiment to capture the dust and debris present in the Solar System. All these campaigns are being taken up in the ECa. You could consider joining the ECa yahoo group, or become a ECa member.

      for more information visit www.eclipsechasers.org

      Ajay Talwar






      ________________________________
      From: "pandya_rajan890@..." <pandya_rajan890@...>
      To: Astronomy_Activities_2009@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Friday, March 6, 2009 10:49:34 AM
      Subject: [Astronomy_Activities_2009] some inQuiry on TSE-09

      in solar ecclipse we make drawing of 1st contact & then drawings after some particular time interval then peak time's drawing & atlast last contact,some of u take snaps instead of drawings so i wanna to ask that what can u conclude from those drawings or photos?what other kinds of project can be done by us without any specific costly equipments?



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    • nandivada_rathnasree
      Hello Rajan, Even as I was composing a reply to your mail, Ajay has posted with his wonderfully thorough thoughts on this. Yes, do join the ECa group and ring
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 6, 2009
        Hello Rajan,

        Even as I was composing a reply to your mail, Ajay has posted with his wonderfully thorough thoughts on this.

        Yes, do join the ECa group and ring - that should be very useful.

        I am also trying to make some wiki pages where a discussion of all possible simple observations, with no equipment other than something that will give a stable projected image of the Sun - could be placed - by anyone.

        Maybe questions like yours, could be added to these wiki pages and answers collected together.

        I am also looking at some interesting historical papers that contain meticulous sketches and so on - let me make at least a beginning compilation and place it on the wiki - I will then post with the link, thik hai?

        Uses of sketches could be : 1. An appreciation of Lunar Limb profile from possible Baily's beads sketches. 2. comparing predicted timings for contacts, with accuracies achievable with jugad equipment. (I have some thoughts for this, which I will place on the wiki).

        OK, I was going to add more thoughts, but, Ajay has said so many interesting things - let me read his mail more carefully, first :-)

        Rathnasree, Nehru Planetarium, New Delhi







        --- In Astronomy_Activities_2009@yahoogroups.com, pandya_rajan890@... wrote:
        >
        > in solar ecclipse we make drawing of 1st contact & then drawings after some particular time interval then peak time's drawing & atlast last contact,some of u take snaps instead of drawings so i wanna to ask that what can u conclude from those drawings or photos?what other kinds of project can be done by us without any specific costly equipments?
        >
        >
        >
        > Add more friends to your messenger and enjoy! Go to http://messenger.yahoo.com/invite/
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • rajan pandya
        first of all thank you very much sir but still have some questions in my mind:   1) i didn t get it properly what u wanna to say in your lunar shadow
        Message 3 of 4 , Mar 6, 2009
          first of all thank you very much sir but still have some questions in my mind:
           
          1) i didn't get it properly what u wanna to say in your lunar shadow project,truly speaking i dont have clear cut idea of lunar shadow so can u please explain it in detail?please sir.
           
          2)if i do most of this project (as i m an engg. student dont have intrest in behavior of birds animals) what i can conclude from that datas?in which directions i should not analyse that data?? as its the bestest best chanse for me and for all.

          --- On Fri, 6/3/09, Ajay Talwar <ajaytalwar80@...> wrote:


          From: Ajay Talwar <ajaytalwar80@...>
          Subject: Re: [Astronomy_Activities_2009] some inQuiry on TSE-09
          To: Astronomy_Activities_2009@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Friday, 6 March, 2009, 1:36 PM






          Hello Ranjan,

          I would like to suggest a few projects without using specific costly equipments.

          1. You can measure the extent of corona during totality, how far does it extend from the sun and in which direction(s) . When you extend your hand at arms length your thumbnail measures approx 1 degree, and the fist (roughly 10 degrees, not counting the thumb) we can measure the extent of the corona from the edges. 10 min before totality, a patch can be applied to one eye to get ready for the darkness during totality, and keep the other eye to observe the pre-totality phase. DURING totality, open the closed eye (now more sensitive to faint light of the Corona) and strech our one arm fully towards the sun, then make the measurements with thumb, fingers or the fist. Remember to close the 'pre-totality' eye closed during the totality.

          2. Measure the time: With the help of a clock and just observing we can measure the timings and duration of the solar eclipse from the first contact to the fourth.

          3. Observing the impact on our Biosphere: Since we, in India, will be observing the eclipse a little above the horizon on the east, the event will surely confuse the birds and animals around. It will be like a double sunrise on 22nd July. You can observe their behavior before, during and after the eclipse.

          4. During the three minutes totality, observe the horizon in all directions. When the eclipse is happening near zenith, all round on the horizon you can see sunset hues and colours, this eclipse in India will surely be different.

          5. Observe the approaching lunar shadow. On a cloudless day, to observe the approaching or receding lunar shadow, we should be on an altitude as high as possible and view a plateau region. We want to be on a vantage point (for example khandala ghat), this lets us see till far on the horizon, where we can see the edge of shadows. But in case of a cloudy day or if there are scattered clouds, or in case of misty, hazy atmosphere, the altitude of the clouds will help us, we can already look far. STANDING ON THE GROUND ITSELF WE ARE AT A VANTAGE POINT! Then we don't need a high altitude. You are never clouded out of an eclipse.

          6. As the Sun goes smaller and smaller progressively, the shadows of objects get sharp.

          7. Pinhole images of the eclipse: through the leaves of the trees, one can see beautiful crecents of the solar eclipse, being formed on the ground. The leaves act as pinholes and the ground acts as the image forming plane. The tree pinholes images give us and exact replica and multiple eclipse happening on the ground.

          8. Shadow bands: we see the stars twinkle in the night sky because of the point light passing through our turbulent atmosphere. if the star would have been bright and casting shadows, we would have seen variations in the shadows. when the sun is eclipsed its size reduces, and the shadows are effected by the atmosphere. there are patterns formed on the ground. these are not shadows of any objects, but the shadows of the atmosphere due to turbulance. at some points there is more of sunlight,and at some there is lesser(shadows) . due to orientation of the crescent, the shadows are formed in bands, of darker and lighter regions. One can observe them moving in particular direction, and one can report the timing of this event, when did they occur relative to totality, how long did they last, and what was the intensity.

          9. You can keep a record of temperature of the air, water, soil, deeper soil and see how the temperature changes during an eclipse. This does require a reference reading few days before and after the eclipse though.

          Eclipse Chasers Athenaeum is organising such experiments under the leadership of Dr Hari Om Vats of PRL and Dr Jamer R. Huddle of U.S. Naval Academy. Recently Glenn Schneider also proposed a simple photography experiment to capture the dust and debris present in the Solar System. All these campaigns are being taken up in the ECa. You could consider joining the ECa yahoo group, or become a ECa member.

          for more information visit www.eclipsechasers. org

          Ajay Talwar

          ____________ _________ _________ __
          From: "pandya_rajan890@ yahoo.co. in" <pandya_rajan890@ yahoo.co. in>
          To: Astronomy_Activitie s_2009@yahoogrou ps.com
          Sent: Friday, March 6, 2009 10:49:34 AM
          Subject: [Astronomy_Activiti es_2009] some inQuiry on TSE-09

          in solar ecclipse we make drawing of 1st contact & then drawings after some particular time interval then peak time's drawing & atlast last contact,some of u take snaps instead of drawings so i wanna to ask that what can u conclude from those drawings or photos?what other kinds of project can be done by us without any specific costly equipments?

          Add more friends to your messenger and enjoy! Go to http://messenger. yahoo.com/ invite/

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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          Add more friends to your messenger and enjoy! Go to http://messenger.yahoo.com/invite/

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