Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

college

Expand Messages
  • patrick morris
    I have a 15 yr old son. I don t really see how unschooling miraculously becomes good schooling in higher education, my wife doesn t quite share in my mistrust.
    Message 1 of 7 , Feb 21, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      I have a 15 yr old son. I don't really see how unschooling
      miraculously becomes good schooling in higher education, my wife
      doesn't quite share in my mistrust. what do you unschooled kids/adults
      see college as ? patrick
    • Cameron Lovejoy
      College can be very beneficial; offer great classes with interesting people; and act as a great place to become independent. But it can also limit the many
      Message 2 of 7 , Feb 21, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        College can be very beneficial; offer great classes with interesting people; and act as a
        great place to become independent. But it can also limit the many possibilities and options
        one has as a self-directed, multi-interest learner; cost extreme amounts of money; and
        be a place full of aimless, drunk college students who are not passionate about their own
        education.

        College is definitely up to the individual. Many of the unschoolers I know (many are on
        this list) have attended, or are currently in college. This was their choice. A problem I have
        with parents forcing their children to go to college (my girlfriend's mother made her go
        directly after high school) is that they aren't there for a reason. For all the money that is
        spent on college (not to mention loans that HAVE to be paid back after college) I find it
        very wise to go for a personal reason.

        I've experienced college classes and the college social life. What I find are many
        uninterested, narrow-minded, passionless kids only there because their parents forced
        them, and are going crazy with drugs and drinking becuase they finally have the freedom
        to do whatever they want. That's what a lot of college looks like to me- a place where
        young adults who haven't had any freedom go to party and try live on their own without
        any idea what they want from this "higher education".

        College is different than high school, however. You can pick or drop classes, choose your
        professors, and search for schools that fit YOU- not the other way around. You can make
        hundreds of meaningful connections, meet great people, challenge yourself, live on your
        own, and learn what you want to learn.

        I, personally, don't find college to be the path I need to be on at this point in my life. I can
        always choose to go if my mind changes. I've thought about it, and the amount of money I
        would spend on college I could spend to start my own business. And for the four years I
        would be in college I could be actually working in the field I would be going to college for!

        My friend is in college for theatre. I think that's absurd! What she should do is go to New
        York and work her way up the totem pole, learning everything there is to know about the
        theater. She would be making money instead of loosing it, learning from professionals,
        living on her own, spending her time in the theater instead of an uninteresting history or
        Spanish class, and actually living the lifestyle of an actress, technician or play-write.

        I know all of us unschoolers have different views on college, but I think we all agree that
        one should go for a particular reason.

        Cameron Lovejoy



        --- In Ask_Unschooling_Offspring@yahoogroups.com, "patrick morris" <katinandrea@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > I have a 15 yr old son. I don't really see how unschooling
        > miraculously becomes good schooling in higher education, my wife
        > doesn't quite share in my mistrust. what do you unschooled kids/adults
        > see college as ? patrick
        >
      • allenbasic
        Hi Patrick, I can understand your mistrust here, and I think it s wise for you to research this until you find an answer that satisfies you and your family. In
        Message 3 of 7 , Feb 21, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          Hi Patrick,

          I can understand your mistrust here, and I think it's wise for you to
          research this until you find an answer that satisfies you and your
          family.

          In my sister's case, she went the traditional route. After taking a gap
          year after high school, she applied to several colleges and was accepted
          at most. She's doing fine; this year (now a junior) she is studying
          abroad in Thialand.

          I'm 19 years old, and graduated high school last spring. In my case I'm
          holding off on college. This was a personal decision that nearly everyone
          I've talked with supports.

          Thanks to my unschooling backround, I've spent the last 6 years really
          studying and honing my two favorite skills: video animation, and web
          design. In this time I've had numerous internships, done my share of
          freelancing work, and recently have co-started two companies in these
          fields.

          Because I'm staying at home, not only have I been able to really pursue these two interests, but have broadened out and also:

          1) Took a 6-week "adventure" study trip to Argentina with 9 unschoolers
          and 2 adult leaders

          2) Spent a lot of time in Orlando in December and February managing a
          rental property I'm responsible for: negotiating/moving out non-paying
          old tenants, and organizing contracters to do repairs

          I also am working on a spirituality site for teenagers - a project I'm
          very passionate about.

          So there are TONS of things that are keeping me busy. I am thrilled with
          my life and wouldn't have things any other way at this point. I am a
          part-time student at my community college, where I'm learning marketing
          and financial accounting.

          My teacher said I'm easily the most attentive person in her classes. I
          suppose the reason is, I genuinely *want* to learn these two subjects --
          I go home and see how they're applicable to my life (my businesses). This
          isn't the case for a lot of my peers... they're there because they "have"
          to be to get the degree they supposedly "need". They have this tunnel
          vision which results in valuable instruction effort being lost.

          I'm not trying to imply that a degree is useless (far from it).
          Personally, I do intend to earn a bachelors degree in the not-so-distant
          future.

          But when I go for it, I'm going to know exactly what I want to study.
          Because I'll have seen why it applies to my field. And I'll be excited as
          anything to have the chance to learn it.


          So take my sentiments as you will. My cousin, homeschooled, is convinced
          that without going right to college, he'll be stuck "in the world" with
          no future, or worse, "stuck" living at home for years.

          I don't know how valid his concerns are. Maybe it only "works" for me
          because I've already honed skills which I can market. It really depends
          on each individual person. Do you think he can do it?

          Sorry that I can't give you a "yes" or "no". All I can share is a story
          of what is working really well for me.

          All the best,

          --Allen Ellis

          --- In Ask_Unschooling_Offspring@yahoogroups.com, "patrick morris"
          <katinandrea@...> wrote:
          >
          > I have a 15 yr old son. I don't really see how unschooling
          > miraculously becomes good schooling in higher education, my wife
          > doesn't quite share in my mistrust. what do you unschooled kids/adults
          > see college as ? patrick
          >
        • Eli Gerzon
          I actually started unschooling when I was your son s age Patrick, ten years ago, I m now twenty five years old. I took some classes at a local community
          Message 4 of 7 , Feb 21, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            I actually started unschooling when I was your son's age Patrick, ten years ago, I'm now twenty five years old. I took some classes at a local community college in my teens and really enjoyed them and learned a lot but have not gone to college full-time or gotten a degree. I've been drawn to the idea of going to college at times but have certainly never needed to. I really like what Cameron said about going for a reason and I didn't have one.

            Personally, I just always wanted to travel around the world so in my final year of unschooling high school I did odd jobs to pay for travel in Europe. I did all sorts of odd jobs at first but when I got back from Europe I began specializing in landscaping. That landscaping businesses has supported my life in the U.S. and my travels abroad (it's often cheaper to travel than to live in the U.S. actually). I always wrote a newsletter while I travelled and now I've been speaking at unschooling gatherings and leading travel tours for others who want to travel abroad. I call them Worldschool Travel Tours because for me the world has been my school, my higher education. And I want to give other people the chance to learn as much from travel as I have.

            Like I said, I was drawn to college at times. At one point, I just wanted to be normal and follow the path that so many people I knew had travelled, including my unschooling peers. I knew I could earn enough with my landscaping business but I was looking for something to give structure and direction to my life. But when I sampled and eventually took another college class I was very disappointed by the level of genuine caring for the subject and the understanding of it. I did fine, I got a B+ in the class, and learned a ton. But part of what I learned was the limit of college and the amount of truth a professors even, or especially, at an Ivy League school can actually impart to their students. A lot of it about not offending the wrong people and following the correct guidelines.

            And the last time I was drawn to college, it wasn't actually college it was just the degree I wanted! I was looking for some sort of recognition for all that I learned. Because I had really gone through some transformations from my travels and a graduation ceremony sounded really good! But I happened to be invited to speak at the Rethinking Education unschooling conference in Texas in 2007. Sharing photos, stories, and lessons from my travels and having it valued by all these people meant so much to me. I haven't thought about going to college since then.

            For me college would be and would have been a very big impediment to the life that I've created and am very happy with now.

            -Eli
            www.eligerzon.com


            --- On Sat, 2/21/09, Cameron Lovejoy <cameronlovejoy@...> wrote:
            From: Cameron Lovejoy <cameronlovejoy@...>
            Subject: [Ask_Unschooling_Offspring] Re: college
            To: Ask_Unschooling_Offspring@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Saturday, February 21, 2009, 1:37 PM

            College can be very beneficial; offer great classes with interesting people; and act as a
            great place to become independent. But it can also limit the many possibilities and options
            one has as a self-directed, multi-interest learner; cost extreme amounts of money; and
            be a place full of aimless, drunk college students who are not passionate about their own
            education.

            College is definitely up to the individual. Many of the unschoolers I know (many are on
            this list) have attended, or are currently in college. This was their choice. A problem I have
            with parents forcing their children to go to college (my girlfriend's mother made her go
            directly after high school) is that they aren't there for a reason. For all the money that is
            spent on college (not to mention loans that HAVE to be paid back after college) I find it
            very wise to go for a personal reason.

            I've experienced college classes and the college social life. What I find are many
            uninterested, narrow-minded, passionless kids only there because their parents forced
            them, and are going crazy with drugs and drinking becuase they finally have the freedom
            to do whatever they want. That's what a lot of college looks like to me- a place where
            young adults who haven't had any freedom go to party and try live on their own without
            any idea what they want from this "higher education".

            College is different than high school, however. You can pick or drop classes, choose your
            professors, and search for schools that fit YOU- not the other way around. You can make
            hundreds of meaningful connections, meet great people, challenge yourself, live on your
            own, and learn what you want to learn.

            I, personally, don't find college to be the path I need to be on at this point in my life. I can
            always choose to go if my mind changes. I've thought about it, and the amount of money I
            would spend on college I could spend to start my own business. And for the four years I
            would be in college I could be actually working in the field I would be going to college for!

            My friend is in college for theatre. I think that's absurd! What she should do is go to New
            York and work her way up the totem pole, learning everything there is to know about the
            theater. She would be making money instead of loosing it, learning from professionals,
            living on her own, spending her time in the theater instead of an uninteresting history or
            Spanish class, and actually living the lifestyle of an actress, technician or play-write.

            I know all of us unschoolers have different views on college, but I think we all agree that
            one should go for a particular reason.

            Cameron Lovejoy

            --- In Ask_Unschooling_ Offspring@ yahoogroups. com, "patrick morris" <katinandrea@ ...>
            wrote:
            >
            > I have a 15 yr old son. I don't really see how unschooling
            > miraculously becomes good schooling in higher education, my wife
            > doesn't quite share in my mistrust. what do you unschooled kids/adults
            > see college as ? patrick
            >


          • quinnsjogerman@ymail.com
            ... Hey Patrick. Like your son I am a 15 year old boy looking at colleges. Many unschoolers I know are either going or are in college right now, I also know
            Message 5 of 7 , Feb 22, 2009
            • 0 Attachment
              --- In Ask_Unschooling_Offspring@yahoogroups.com, "patrick morris" <katinandrea@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > I have a 15 yr old son. I don't really see how unschooling
              > miraculously becomes good schooling in higher education, my wife
              > doesn't quite share in my mistrust. what do you unschooled kids/adults
              > see college as ? patrick
              >

              Hey Patrick.
              Like your son I am a 15 year old boy looking at colleges.
              Many unschoolers I know are either going or are in college right now, I also know more
              than a few unschoolers who have decided against college.
              For me as far back as I can remember I have had a drive to work in the field of biology and
              more specifically Wildlife biology.
              Because of this goal I do plan on attending college because I believe that it is the best way
              for me to achieve my own ideals in life. I know that for what I plan on doing in my life
              college will be very helpful.
              However just because I believe college is right for me I do not see it as the only way to
              achieve goals in life, or even as the only way to get a higher education.
              It really come down to what the individual person believes is the right path for him or her
              self.
              Some people will find college right for them, some won't, but I think either way people
              should find something they are passionate and make a plan around that, whether college
              is part of that plan is up to the person making it.
              Thanks for reading.
              Quinn
            • kittykatkelsey
              Hi Patrick, I think that college is a great option if you now what you want to do and that education from it is going to get you closer to that. I would like
              Message 6 of 7 , Feb 22, 2009
              • 0 Attachment
                Hi Patrick,

                I think that college is a great option if you now what you want to do
                and that education from it is going to get you closer to that. I
                would like to point out that from what I know, college is very
                different from say high school. I know of a lot of proffesers that
                actually preefer homeschoolers/unschoolers because they have more of
                a passion for learning. I also believe that the large part of what
                makes us unschoolers is are ability to decide for our selves what it
                is that we want to do with are lives. And if your SON FEELS that
                college is the right path for him he should pursue that.

                Personally I had a terrible trying to decide whether or not college
                was something that I wanted to try. In the end I decided that I
                think it's an expensive way for some one to figure out what they want
                to do with there life. I have recently decided on some fun ways that
                I want use to expose my self to a lot of different people, places and
                all the ideas and knowledge that I hope to gain from them and the
                world. So now I've been planning out the steps to bring my ideas in
                to reality (such as the road trip I'm taking this summer). I still
                don't really have a life plan. But I have a year plan and I'm slowly
                building on it and hoping that it will take me somewhere that will
                make me happy.

                And if I decide at some point that college is a path that will get me
                where I want be, you can be sure that I'm going to take advantage of
                that.

                Hope this helped,
                Kelsey

                --- In Ask_Unschooling_Offspring@yahoogroups.com, "patrick morris"
                <katinandrea@...> wrote:
                >
                > I have a 15 yr old son. I don't really see how unschooling
                > miraculously becomes good schooling in higher education, my wife
                > doesn't quite share in my mistrust. what do you unschooled
                kids/adults
                > see college as ? patrick
                >
              • phredd27
                I see college as optional. Beneficial in some cases, in following interests or a certain career. But, it also costs money. So maybe best to be a bit
                Message 7 of 7 , Feb 27, 2009
                • 0 Attachment
                  I see college as optional. Beneficial in some cases, in following
                  interests or a certain career. But, it also costs money. So maybe best
                  to be a bit indecisive.

                  ~Nola

                  --- In Ask_Unschooling_Offspring@yahoogroups.com, "patrick morris"
                  <katinandrea@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > I have a 15 yr old son. I don't really see how unschooling
                  > miraculously becomes good schooling in higher education, my wife
                  > doesn't quite share in my mistrust. what do you unschooled
                  kids/adults
                  > see college as ? patrick
                  >
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.