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Re: The genetic legacy of religious diversity and intolerance: paternal lineages of christians, jews, and muslims in the iberian peninsula.

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  • Dave Howard
    Rebekah, Thanks for putting up this excellent study. That there are no Q1b s attests to our uniqueness. I continue to say that the evidence shows that 99% of
    Message 1 of 7 , May 25, 2009
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      Rebekah,

      Thanks for putting up this excellent study. That there are no Q1b's attests to our uniqueness. I continue to say that the evidence shows that 99% of the Q1b's in the European population are us, i.e. Ashkenazi Jewish.

      Clearly the source of the M378 marker that makes us Q1b is not Iberia. As of now I still like the Radanite connection to Sindhi.

      Dave





      --- In Ashkenazi-Q@yahoogroups.com, Rebekah Canada <rebekahthorn@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi,
      >
      > I have uploaded the files. There is nothing that looks like Q1b in
      > Iberia. Ted Kandell confirmed the lack of G2c. T and R2 are also
      > missing.
      >
      > Rebekah
      >
      > Adams SM, Bosch E, Balaresque PL, Ballereau SJ, Lee AC, Arroyo E, et
      > al. The genetic legacy of religious diversity and intolerance:
      > paternal lineages of christians, jews, and muslims in the iberian
      > peninsula. American journal of human genetics. 2008 Dec;83(6):725-36.
      >
      > Abstract:
      > Most studies of European genetic diversity have focused on large-scale
      > variation and interpretations based on events in prehistory, but
      > migrations and invasions in historical times could also have had
      > profound effects on the genetic landscape. The Iberian Peninsula
      > provides a suitable region for examination of the demographic impact
      > of such recent events, because its complex recent history has involved
      > the long-term residence of two very different populations with
      > distinct geographical origins and their own particular cultural and
      > religious characteristics-North African Muslims and Sephardic Jews. To
      > address this issue, we analyzed Y chromosome haplotypes, which provide
      > the necessary phylogeographic resolution, in 1140 males from the
      > Iberian Peninsula and Balearic Islands. Admixture analysis based on
      > binary and Y-STR haplotypes indicates a high mean proportion of
      > ancestry from North African (10.6%) and Sephardic Jewish (19.8%)
      > sources. Despite alternative possible sources for lineages ascribed a
      > Sephardic Jewish origin, these proportions attest to a high level of
      > religious conversion (whether voluntary or enforced), driven by
      > historical episodes of social and religious intolerance, that
      > ultimately led to the integration of descendants. In agreement with
      > the historical record, analysis of haplotype sharing and diversity
      > within specific haplogroups suggests that the Sephardic Jewish
      > component is the more ancient. The geographical distribution of North
      > African ancestry in the peninsula does not reflect the initial
      > colonization and subsequent withdrawal and is likely to result from
      > later enforced population movement-more marked in some regions than in
      > others-plus the effects of genetic drift.
      >
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