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ARTICLE: Inbreeding, pedigree size, and the most recent common ancestor of humanity

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  • Rebekah Canada
    Hi Group, I have decided to send this paper because it has such great tables and charts. Best, Rebekah Joseph Lachance, Inbreeding, pedigree size, and the most
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 19, 2009
    Hi Group,
     
    I have decided to send this paper because it has such great tables and charts.
     
     
    Best,
    Rebekah
     
    Joseph Lachance,
    Inbreeding, pedigree size, and the most recent common ancestor of humanity,
    Journal of Theoretical Biology,
    Volume 261, Issue 2, 21 November 2009, Pages 238-247, ISSN 0022-5193,
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jtbi.2009.08.006.
    Abstract:
    How many generations ago did the common ancestor of all present-day
    individuals live, and how does inbreeding affect this estimate? The
    number of ancestors within family trees determines the timing of the
    most recent common ancestor of humanity. However, mating is often
    non-random and inbreeding is ubiquitous in natural populations. Rates
    of pedigree growth are found for multiple types of inbreeding. This
    data is then combined with models of global population structure to
    estimate biparental coalescence times. When pedigrees for regular
    systems of mating are constructed, the growth rates of inbred
    populations contain Fibonacci n-step constants. The timing of the most
    recent common ancestor depends on global population structure, the
    mean rate of pedigree growth, mean fitness, and current population
    size. Inbreeding reduces the number of ancestors in a pedigree,
    pushing back global common ancestry times. These results are
    consistent with the remarkable findings of previous studies: all
    humanity shares common ancestry in the recent past.

    Keywords: Biparental coalescence; Genealogy; Inbreeding; MRCA; Theory
  • christopher baysinger
    So it was the Illuminati? [ Just a random Don Brown joke about the Fibonacci reference] Christopher D. Baysinger, cdbaysinger@hotmail.com Dance like no one is
    Message 2 of 4 , Dec 19, 2009
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      So it was the Illuminati? [ Just a random Don Brown joke about the Fibonacci reference]

      Christopher D. Baysinger, cdbaysinger@...

      Dance like no one is watching. Sing like no one is listening. Love like you've never been hurt and live like it's heaven on Earth.

           Mark Twain

      A man can be free without being great, but no man can be great without being free.

           Kahlil Gibran






      To: Ashkenazi-Q@yahoogroups.com
      From: rebekahthorn@...
      Date: Sat, 19 Dec 2009 02:39:54 -0600
      Subject: [Ashkenazi-Q] ARTICLE: Inbreeding, pedigree size, and the most recent common ancestor of humanity [3 Attachments]

       
      [Attachment(s) from Rebekah Canada included below]
      Hi Group,
       
      I have decided to send this paper because it has such great tables and charts.
       
       
      Best,
      Rebekah
       
      Joseph Lachance,
      Inbreeding, pedigree size, and the most recent common ancestor of humanity,
      Journal of Theoretical Biology,
      Volume 261, Issue 2, 21 November 2009, Pages 238-247, ISSN 0022-5193,
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jtbi. 2009.08.006.
      Abstract:
      How many generations ago did the common ancestor of all present-day
      individuals live, and how does inbreeding affect this estimate? The
      number of ancestors within family trees determines the timing of the
      most recent common ancestor of humanity. However, mating is often
      non-random and inbreeding is ubiquitous in natural populations. Rates
      of pedigree growth are found for multiple types of inbreeding. This
      data is then combined with models of global population structure to
      estimate biparental coalescence times. When pedigrees for regular
      systems of mating are constructed, the growth rates of inbred
      populations contain Fibonacci n-step constants. The timing of the most
      recent common ancestor depends on global population structure, the
      mean rate of pedigree growth, mean fitness, and current population
      size. Inbreeding reduces the number of ancestors in a pedigree,
      pushing back global common ancestry times. These results are
      consistent with the remarkable findings of previous studies: all
      humanity shares common ancestry in the recent past.

      Keywords: Biparental coalescence; Genealogy; Inbreeding; MRCA; Theory



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    • jerry
      hello again and happy new year. i ve been reading up on the q haplotype.  it spread west over the eurasion continent though not very much so, and its
      Message 3 of 4 , Jan 1, 2010
      • 0 Attachment
        hello again and happy new year. i've been reading up on the q haplotype.  it spread west over the eurasion continent though not very much so, and its found at aprox. a 5% rate on the shetland islands and in iceland and norway, too. do you know if the shetland island and scandinavian q is similar to ashenazi q? if so, are there theories on how it got to scandinavia and britiain? also, is q a caucasion haplotype or is it an asian one?
        thanks,
        jerry p.

         

        From: Rebekah Canada <rebekahthorn@...>
        To: Q (Ashkenazi Group) <Ashkenazi-Q@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Sat, December 19, 2009 12:39:54 AM
        Subject: [Ashkenazi-Q] ARTICLE: Inbreeding, pedigree size, and the most recent common ancestor of humanity [3 Attachments]

         

        Hi Group,
         
        I have decided to send this paper because it has such great tables and charts.
         
         
        Best,
        Rebekah
         
        Joseph Lachance,
        Inbreeding, pedigree size, and the most recent common ancestor of humanity,
        Journal of Theoretical Biology,
        Volume 261, Issue 2, 21 November 2009, Pages 238-247, ISSN 0022-5193,
        DOI: 10.1016/j.jtbi. 2009.08.006.
        Abstract:
        How many generations ago did the common ancestor of all present-day
        individuals live, and how does inbreeding affect this estimate? The
        number of ancestors within family trees determines the timing of the
        most recent common ancestor of humanity. However, mating is often
        non-random and inbreeding is ubiquitous in natural populations. Rates
        of pedigree growth are found for multiple types of inbreeding. This
        data is then combined with models of global population structure to
        estimate biparental coalescence times. When pedigrees for regular
        systems of mating are constructed, the growth rates of inbred
        populations contain Fibonacci n-step constants. The timing of the most
        recent common ancestor depends on global population structure, the
        mean rate of pedigree growth, mean fitness, and current population
        size. Inbreeding reduces the number of ancestors in a pedigree,
        pushing back global common ancestry times. These results are
        consistent with the remarkable findings of previous studies: all
        humanity shares common ancestry in the recent past.

        Keywords: Biparental coalescence; Genealogy; Inbreeding; MRCA; Theory

      • Rebekah Canada
        Hi Jerry, The Shetland Island and Scandinavian Qs are all Q1a3 (Q-M346). They are not related to Ashkenazi Q in many many thousands of years. I would describe
        Message 4 of 4 , Feb 6, 2010
        • 0 Attachment
          Hi Jerry,

          The Shetland Island and Scandinavian Qs are all Q1a3 (Q-M346). They are not related to Ashkenazi Q in many many thousands of years.

          I would describe Q in general as Eurasian and of the Americas. The Q --also the R1b one for what it is worth-- mutation happened in Central Asia but there has been a large geographic spreed since.

          Best,
          Rebekah

          On Fri, Jan 1, 2010 at 8:52 PM, jerry <gjprag77@...> wrote:


          hello again and happy new year. i've been reading up on the q haplotype.  it spread west over the eurasion continent though not very much so, and its found at aprox. a 5% rate on the shetland islands and in iceland and norway, too. do you know if the shetland island and scandinavian q is similar to ashenazi q? if so, are there theories on how it got to scandinavia and britiain? also, is q a caucasion haplotype or is it an asian one?
          thanks,
          jerry p.


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