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Re: [Asatru-U] Section 5F comments

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  • Ann Sheffield
    Section on Death and the Afterlife. This touches on the soul complex , but there is no real agreement among heathens about what the parts are, how they
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 20, 2000
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      Section on Death and the Afterlife.

      This touches on the "soul complex", but there is no real agreement among
      heathens about what the parts are, how they interact, or what happens to
      them after death. I also think that claiming that the soul-parts
      (whatever they are) foreshadow modern psychology is stretching things a
      bit.

      Communicating the complexity, and the similar complexity of afterlife
      possibilities, of this to new people will be difficult. (Some day, Joe
      Mandato and I will actually write our article on death, and I'll be
      surprised if it runs to less that 30 pages...) If nobody else leaps
      into the breach, I'll take a crack at it once I get through my major
      comments on the rest of the outline.

      BTW, Going through all this is making me very much aware of how much
      work Kadlin, Rick, Tim et al. have done - thank you all!

      Wassail,

      Groa
    • Ann Sheffield
      An attempt at a revised intro. for the Death and the Afterlife section: Both the nature of the human soul and its fate after death are of great interest to
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 21, 2000
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        An attempt at a revised intro. for the "Death and the Afterlife"
        section:

        Both the nature of the human soul and its fate after death are of great
        interest to Heathens, but there is no clear consensus about either, and
        Asatru makes no promises of "eternal reward". The only certainty is:

        Cattle die and kinsmen die,
        thyself too soon must die,
        but one thing never, I ween, will die, --
        fair fame of one who has earned.

        (Havamal; Olive Bray's translation)

        Part of this ambiguity comes from the fragmented nature of the sources.
        There are hints that Heathens did not think in terms of a single,
        unified "soul", but instead saw human beings as complexes of biological,
        intellectual/emotional, and spiritual components. Some modern Heathens
        have suggested various decriptions of this "soul complex", but none has
        yet been widely accepted. Similarly, the lore describes many possible
        fates - from feasting in Valhall to living on in the grave-mound to
        meddling in the affairs of one's descendants - for the dead. The
        article below provides a first introduction to some of these concepts
        about the self and death.

        Wassail,

        Groa
      • Kadlin Waltheofsdottir
        I like Groa s revised version of the section introduction for soul & afterlife. I freely admit, I was flailing on that one & you guys caught me at it! I
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 21, 2000
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          I like Groa's revised version of the section introduction for soul &
          afterlife. I freely admit, I was flailing on that one & you guys
          caught me at it! I think the length of Groa's intro is not a
          problem, because there is only one article in the section.

          --Kadlin
        • tcku@aol.com
          Excellent Groa! Anything more really would have to get into the different stories of wights and mounds, and summoning the dead for information. Wassail! Night
          Message 4 of 4 , Nov 21, 2000
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            Excellent Groa! Anything more really would have to get into the different
            stories of wights and mounds, and summoning the dead for information.

            Wassail!

            Night Winds

            > An attempt at a revised intro. for the "Death and the Afterlife"
            > section:
            >
            > Both the nature of the human soul and its fate after death are of great
            > interest to Heathens, but there is no clear consensus about either, and
            > Asatru makes no promises of "eternal reward". The only certainty is:
            >
            > Cattle die and kinsmen die,
            > thyself too soon must die,
            > but one thing never, I ween, will die, --
            > fair fame of one who has earned.
            >
            > (Havamal; Olive Bray's translation)
            >
            > Part of this ambiguity comes from the fragmented nature of the sources.
            > There are hints that Heathens did not think in terms of a single,
            > unified "soul", but instead saw human beings as complexes of biological,
            > intellectual/emotional, and spiritual components. Some modern Heathens
            > have suggested various decriptions of this "soul complex", but none has
            > yet been widely accepted. Similarly, the lore describes many possible
            > fates - from feasting in Valhall to living on in the grave-mound to
            > meddling in the affairs of one's descendants - for the dead. The
            > article below provides a first introduction to some of these concepts
            > about the self and death.
            >
            > Wassail,
            >
            > Groa
            >
            >



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