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Gods course

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  • Manny Olds
    Okay, so tell me about this one. What are your first thoughts? Even I dunno, looks okay would be information. What particular points would you like a course
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 12, 2002
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      Okay, so tell me about this one. What are your first thoughts? Even "I
      dunno, looks okay" would be information.

      What particular points would you like a course like this to hit? What
      seems important *to you*?

      I. Gods.

      Texts: Tacitus, Prose Edda, Poetic Edda, Ynglingasaga; bits from other
      sagas, Saxo, Bede. Some good, basic "Vikings" book (Viking
      Achievement?) to provide cultural context. Rives translation of Tacitus
      will help do the same for Continental tradition. A-S may be a good
      idea, also. Turville-Petre if possible; HRED and Dubois otherwise.
      "Rites and Religions of the Anglo-Saxons"

      Attention to critical use of sources and interpretation within cultural
      context; consideration of pitfalls and limitations of translation;
      attention to conflicting accounts (e.g., Balder in Snorri vs. Saxo).
    • Lorrie Wood
      ... I would have listed the Eddas before Tacitus, personally. -- Lorrie
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 12, 2002
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        On Tue, Mar 12, 2002 at 03:51:11PM -0500, Manny Olds wrote:
        > Okay, so tell me about this one. What are your first thoughts? Even "I
        > dunno, looks okay" would be information.
        >
        > What particular points would you like a course like this to hit? What
        > seems important *to you*?

        I would have listed the Eddas before Tacitus, personally.

        -- Lorrie
      • J Blain
        Manny et al, First, what are the aims of the course, and what would be its (more or less measurable) learning outcomes? When people are creating a new course
        Message 3 of 5 , Mar 12, 2002
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          Manny et al,
          First, what are the aims of the course, and what would be its (more
          or less measurable) learning outcomes?
          When people are creating a new course at a college, they start with
          these, and then work backwards from there.

          Jenny

          >Okay, so tell me about this one. What are your first thoughts? Even "I
          >dunno, looks okay" would be information.
          >
          >What particular points would you like a course like this to hit? What
          >seems important *to you*?
          >
          >I. Gods.
          >
          >Texts: Tacitus, Prose Edda, Poetic Edda, Ynglingasaga; bits from other
          >sagas, Saxo, Bede. Some good, basic "Vikings" book (Viking
          >Achievement?) to provide cultural context. Rives translation of Tacitus
          >will help do the same for Continental tradition. A-S may be a good
          >idea, also. Turville-Petre if possible; HRED and Dubois otherwise.
          >"Rites and Religions of the Anglo-Saxons"
          >
          >Attention to critical use of sources and interpretation within cultural
          >context; consideration of pitfalls and limitations of translation;
          >attention to conflicting accounts (e.g., Balder in Snorri vs. Saxo).
        • Kevin Steffen
          I agree with Lorrie, and might even put Tacitus after Ynglingsaga. That was the order I could find them, and even then, I ended up with the wrong books of
          Message 4 of 5 , Mar 12, 2002
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            I agree with Lorrie, and might even put Tacitus after Ynglingsaga. That
            was the order I could find them, and even then, I ended up with the
            wrong books of Tacitus at first.

            Definitely, some sort of critical reading guidelines would help,
            including the variance in primary and secondary texts, how to do (good)
            research. How do you place the social context of the author and the
            effect of the viewpoint. Actually, shouldn't this all be included in a
            (presumably quick) intro to the course?

            Manny Olds wrote:

            > Okay, so tell me about this one. What are your first thoughts? Even "I
            > dunno, looks okay" would be information.
            >
            > What particular points would you like a course like this to hit? What
            > seems important *to you*?
            >
            > I. Gods.
            >
            > Texts: Tacitus, Prose Edda, Poetic Edda, Ynglingasaga; bits from other
            > sagas, Saxo, Bede. Some good, basic "Vikings" book (Viking
            > Achievement?) to provide cultural context. Rives translation of Tacitus
            > will help do the same for Continental tradition. A-S may be a good
            > idea, also. Turville-Petre if possible; HRED and Dubois otherwise.
            > "Rites and Religions of the Anglo-Saxons"
            >
            > Attention to critical use of sources and interpretation within cultural
            > context; consideration of pitfalls and limitations of translation;
            > attention to conflicting accounts (e.g., Balder in Snorri vs. Saxo).
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            > Asatru-U-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            >
            >
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            >
            >
            >
            >
          • tsdoughty@aol.com
            ... I m not equally familiar with all the sources, but here s my take. 1. Prose & Poetic Eddas probably represent the core. 2. Tacitus - yes; important for
            Message 5 of 5 , Mar 13, 2002
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              oldsma@... writes:

              > Texts: Tacitus, Prose Edda, Poetic Edda, Ynglingasaga; bits from other
              > sagas, Saxo, Bede. Some good, basic "Vikings" book (Viking
              > Achievement?) to provide cultural context. Rives translation of Tacitus
              > will help do the same for Continental tradition. A-S may be a good
              > idea, also. Turville-Petre if possible; HRED and Dubois otherwise.
              > "Rites and Religions of the Anglo-Saxons"
              >

              I'm not equally familiar with all the sources, but here's my take.

              1. Prose & Poetic Eddas probably represent the core.
              2. Tacitus - yes; important for another viewpoint in time/space/context; the
              references to gods and spiritual practices are few, but important. There is
              a list of references to religious practices in the Heathenbooks files.
              Rives' notes are excellent to use.
              3. Ynglinga and other sagas. I haven't read most of these yet, but I hear
              there's some important stuff.
              4. Saxo. Yes. Good for point out that differing versions of god myths
              exist, and also that writers had differing explanations for the nature of
              deity: gods vs. mortal heroes.
              5. Viking books. I haven't compared them and most look about the same to
              me. Is Viking Achievement the best of the lot?
              6. Turville-Petre gets my vote. I wish I could afford to buy a copy.

              Tim



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