Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

'Saadhak' & Scientist

Expand Messages
  • vagabondindia
    Question: There is a big laboratory in Presidency college, but their research is not increasing our national wealth in any way – why is it so? Shri Shri
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 10, 2012

      Question: There is a big laboratory in Presidency college, but their research is not increasing our national wealth in any way – why is it so?

      Shri Shri Thakur: That is because one cannot be committed to a fulltime employment and simultaneously doing (real) research work.1 The research which is inspired from the thought of addressing the need of the country, caring  for the welfare of the fellow countrymen by ensuring continued improvement upon their health, education, wealth and peace, is the real research and this is what is endorsed by the `Arya-dharma' as well. The scientists of other developed nations verily do this and so without beating the drums of dharma they happen to be the real dhaarmik.

      Question: People say there is no connection between science and dharma – rather they are like the opposite poles. Science increases worldly comfort whereas dharma brings in renunciation.

      Shri Shri Thakur: Science itself is the guide to the nectarine path of life. Science verily shows us how to lead a blissful life, how to live and grow unabatedly.2 That is why dharma itself invites science. Science is the vision of spirituality. In the process of realising the soul, all that it beholds gradually become visible. The knowledge gained in this process is the real science, and also the real spirituality.


      Question: Well, are the realisations of a scientist and a saadhak (ascetic practitioner) similar? How were the ancient saadhaks and sages of our country? Were they essentially the same scientists as we know today?

      Shri Shri Thakur: The realisation of a scientist comes through observation, the realisation of a saadhak also comes through observation. However, a scientist goes about analysing matter, whereas a saadhak is always in search for the cause behind it. This results in a difference of perception between them.  A saadhak develops his perception through sensation, on the other hand, a scientist's perception comes through particular sense-organs – along with inference. If a scientist develops similar attitude then he can become a saadhak.

      Question: What is this attitude of a saadhak?

      Shri Shri Thakur: If a scientist becomes a  research-man and a saadhak, befitting the age, then all the visions which come in front of him, come through sensation. Now if there be the attitude to materialise these visions physically through apt research, then only there develops a harmony between observation through sensation and observation through analysis – through which the perfect sensation of things can be acquired.3 The attitude of a saadhak verily means that he wants to analyse his complexes to find out the root cause and since these complexes come out through our interactions with surroundings, that brings about his deep affinity towards the `cause'.4

      Foot notes:

      1 – "Almost all paid work is done from desire, not from impulse: the work itself is more or less irksome, but the payment for it is desired. The serious activities that fill a man's working hours are, except in a few fortunate individuals, governed mainly by purposes, not by impulses towards those activities." ― `Principles of social reconstruction' by BERTRAND RUSSELL

      2 – "Science can, if it chooses, enable our grandchildren to live the good life, by giving them knowledge, self-control and characters productive of harmony rather than strife…..Then at least we shall have won our freedom." ― `What I believe' by BERTRAND RUSSELL

      3– "Saint Augustine – one of the four great fathers of the Latin Church. None can deny the greatness of Augustine's soul – his enthusiasm, his unceasing search after truth, his affectionate disposition, his ardour, his self-devotion. No single name has ever exercised such power over the Christian Church, and no mind ever made so deep an impression upon Christian thought. He was more profound than Ambrose, his spiritual father. In him scholastics and mysteries popes and the opponents of the papal supremacy, have seen their champion. He was the function on which Luther rested the thoughts by which he sought to lift the past of the Church out of the rut"

      4 – "It is not the exceptional individual in this world who is to enjoy this supreme vision by means of some process of self-discipline or self-abnegation: it is rather the soul-principle in every individual that at all times possesses the universal knowledge, as that of a queen in her realm, and that makes the mind and the senses in their respective lower planes to acquire a knowledge of both the macrocosm and the microcosm — of the universe at large and of the smaller but equally perfect universe of its own body. This knowledge even includes many things that never come to the individual's conscious intelligence, but remain in the secret and sacred sanctuary of the subconscious, where only the universal control of a divine guardian is active…..the delights which the body and soul are capable of enjoying together are not genuine and true unless they have some further connection, and terminate in the veneration and love of God ; that is, unless they have reference to this love and ultimate end, in a connection with which the sense of delight most essentially consists……..Swedenborg's transition from the attitude of the rigidly mechanical physicist and the speculative philosopher to that of the illumined seer and the exponent of a philosophy no longer human only, but angelic constitutes an experience unique in the annals of human thought." - Swedenborg and the 'Sapientia angelica' by Frank Sewall


      [Ref: Nana Prasange Vol.1, Ninth Edition, Dec-2001, Page 44-47]

      [Note : The original transcript is in Bengali and is translated here by Subrata Ghosh. The words, highlighted in bold are, however, originally used by Shri Shri Thakur Anukulchandra ji Himself]


    • VIJAYANJI
      Shri Shivkur Bapuji Talpade, the Indian who flew an unmanned aircraft, eight years before Wright. Orville Wright demonstrated on December 17th 1903 that it was
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 10, 2012

        Shri Shivkur Bapuji Talpade, the Indian who flew an unmanned aircraft, eight years before Wright.

        Orville Wright demonstrated on December 17th 1903 that it was possible for a ‘manned heavier than air machine to fly’. But, in 1895, eight years earlier, the Sanskrit scholar Shivkar Bapuji Talpade had designed a basic aircraft called Marutsakthi (meaning Power of Air) based on Vedic technology and had it take off unmanned before a large audience in the Chowpathy beach of Bombay. The importance of the Wright brothers lies in the fact, that it was a manned flight for a distance of 120 feet and Orville Wright became the first man to fly. But Talpade’s unmanned aircraft flew to a height of 1500 feet before crashing down and the historian Evan Koshtka, has described Talpade as the ‘first creator of an aircraft’.

        As the world observes the one hundredth anniversary of the first manned flight, it is interesting to consider the saga of India’s 19th century first aircraft inventor for his design was entirely based on the rich treasury of India’s Vedas. Shivkar Bapuji Talpade was born in 1864 in the locality of Chirabazar at Dukkarwadi in Bombay.

        He was a scholar of Sanskrit and from his young age was attracted by the Vaimanika Sastra (Aeronautical Science) expounded by the great Indian sage Maharishi Bhardwaja. One western scholar of Indology Stephen-Knapp has put in simple words or rather has tried to explain what Talpade did and succeeded!

        According to Knapp, the Vaimanika Shastra describes in detail, the construction of what is called, the mercury vortex engine the forerunner of the ion engines being made today by NASA. Knapp adds that additional information on the mercury engines can be found in the ancient Vedic text called Samaranga Sutradhara. This text also devotes 230 verses, to the use of these machines in peace and war. The Indologist William Clarendon, who has written down a detailed description of the mercury vortex engine in his translation of Samaranga Sutradhara quotes thus ‘Inside the circular air frame, place the mercury-engine with its solar mercury boiler at the aircraft center. By means of the power latent in the heated mercury which sets the driving whirlwind in motion a man sitting inside may travel a great distance in a most marvellous manner. Four strong mercury containers must be built into the interior structure. When these have been heated by fire through solar or other sources the vimana (aircraft) develops thunder-power through the mercury.

        NASA (National Aeronau-tical and Space Administra-tion) world’s richest/ most powerful scientific organisation is trying to create an ion engine that is a device that uses a stream of high velocity electrified particles instead of a blast of hot gases like in present day modern jet engines. Surprisingly according to the bi-monthly Ancient Skies published in USA, the aircraft engines being developed for future use by NASA by some strange coincidence also uses mercury bombardment units powered by Solar cells! Interestingly, the impulse is generated in seven stages. The mercury propellant is first vapourised fed into the thruster discharge chamber ionised converted into plasma by a combination with electrons broke down electrically and then accelerated through small openings in a screen to pass out of the engine at velocities between 1200 to 3000 kilometres per minute! But so far NASA has been able to produce an experimental basis only a one pound of thrust by its scientists a power derivation virtually useless. But 108 years ago Talpade was able to use his knowledge of Vaimanika Shastra to produce sufficient thrust to lift his aircraft 1500 feet into the air!

        According to Indian scholar Acharya, ‘Vaimanika Shastra deals about aeronautics including the design of aircraft the way they can be used for transportation and other applications in detail. The knowledge of aeronautics is described in Sanskrit in 100 sections, eight chapters, 500 principles and 3000 slokas including 32 techniques to fly an aircraft. In fact, depending on the classifications of eras or Yugas in modern Kaliyuga aircraft used are called Krithakavimana flown by the power of engines by absorbing solar energies!’ It is feared that only portions of Bharadwaja’s masterpiece Vaimanika Shas-tra survive today.

        The question that comes to one’s mind is, what happened to this wonderful encyclopaedia of aeronautical knowledge accumulated by the Indian savants of yore, and why was it not used? But in those days, such knowledge was the preserve of sages, who would not allow it to be misused, just like the knowledge of atomic bombs is being used by terrorists today!

        According to scholar Ratnakar Mahajan who wrote a brochure on Talpade. ‘Being a Sanskrit scholar interested in aeronautics, Talpade studied and consulted a number of Vedic treatises like Brihad Vaimanika Shastra of Maharishi Bharadwaja Vimanachandrika of Acharya Narayan Muni Viman yantra of Maharish Shownik Yantra Kalp by Maharishi Garg Muni Viman Bindu of Acharya Vachaspati and Vimana Gyanarka Prakashika of Maharishi Dhundiraj’. This gave him confidence that he can build an aircraft with mercury engines. One essential factor in the creation of these Vedic aircraft was the timing of the Suns Rays or Solar energy (as being now utilised by NASA) when they were most effective to activate the mercury ions of the engine. Happily for Talpade Maharaja Sayaji Rao Gaekwad of Baroda a great supporter of the Sciences in India, was willing to help him and Talpade went ahead with his aircraft construction with mercury engines. One day in 1895 (unfortunately the actual date is not mentioned in the Kesari newspaper of Pune which covered the event) before an curious scholarly audience headed by the famous Indian judge/ nationalist/ Mahadeva Govin-da Ranade and H H Sayaji Rao Gaekwad Talpade had the good fortune to see his un manned aircraft named as ‘Marutsakthi’ take off, fly to a height of 1500 feet and then fall down to earth.

        But this success of an Indian scientist was not liked by the Imperial rulers. Warned by the British Government the Maharaja of Baroda stopped helping Talpade. It is said that the remains of the Marutsakthi were sold to ‘foreign parties’ by the relatives of Talpade in order to salvage whatever they can out of their loans to him. Talpade’s wife died at this critical juncture and he was not in a mental frame to continue with his researches. But his efforts to make known the greatness of Vedic Shastras was recognised by Indian scholars, who gave him the title of Vidya Prakash Pra-deep.

        Talpade passed away in 1916 un-honoured, in his own country.

        As the world rightly honours the Wright Brothers for their achievements, we should think of Talpade, who utilised the ancient knowledge of Sanskrit texts, to fly an aircraft, eight years before his foreign counterparts.
        Copyright,1999 The Printers (Mysore) Private Ltd.


        --- On Sat, 11/2/12, vagabondindia <vagabondindia@...> wrote:

        From: vagabondindia <vagabondindia@...>
        Subject: [Aryakrishti Vedic Dharma] 'Saadhak' & Scientist
        To: Aryakrishti-Vedic-Dharma@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Saturday, 11 February, 2012, 11:59 AM

         

        Question: There is a big laboratory in Presidency college, but their research is not increasing our national wealth in any way – why is it so?

        Shri Shri Thakur: That is because one cannot be committed to a fulltime employment and simultaneously doing (real) research work.1 The research which is inspired from the thought of addressing the need of the country, caring  for the welfare of the fellow countrymen by ensuring continued improvement upon their health, education, wealth and peace, is the real research and this is what is endorsed by the `Arya-dharma' as well. The scientists of other developed nations verily do this and so without beating the drums of dharma they happen to be the real dhaarmik.

        Question: People say there is no connection between science and dharma – rather they are like the opposite poles. Science increases worldly comfort whereas dharma brings in renunciation.

        Shri Shri Thakur: Science itself is the guide to the nectarine path of life. Science verily shows us how to lead a blissful life, how to live and grow unabatedly.2 That is why dharma itself invites science. Science is the vision of spirituality. In the process of realising the soul, all that it beholds gradually become visible. The knowledge gained in this process is the real science, and also the real spirituality.


        Question: Well, are the realisations of a scientist and a saadhak (ascetic practitioner) similar? How were the ancient saadhaks and sages of our country? Were they essentially the same scientists as we know today?

        Shri Shri Thakur: The realisation of a scientist comes through observation, the realisation of a saadhak also comes through observation. However, a scientist goes about analysing matter, whereas a saadhak is always in search for the cause behind it. This results in a difference of perception between them.  A saadhak develops his perception through sensation, on the other hand, a scientist's perception comes through particular sense-organs – along with inference. If a scientist develops similar attitude then he can become a saadhak.

        Question: What is this attitude of a saadhak?

        Shri Shri Thakur: If a scientist becomes a  research-man and a saadhak, befitting the age, then all the visions which come in front of him, come through sensation. Now if there be the attitude to materialise these visions physically through apt research, then only there develops a harmony between observation through sensation and observation through analysis – through which the perfect sensation of things can be acquired.3 The attitude of a saadhak verily means that he wants to analyse his complexes to find out the root cause and since these complexes come out through our interactions with surroundings, that brings about his deep affinity towards the `cause'.4

        Foot notes:

        1 "Almost all paid work is done from desire, not from impulse: the work itself is more or less irksome, but the payment for it is desired. The serious activities that fill a man's working hours are, except in a few fortunate individuals, governed mainly by purposes, not by impulses towards those activities." ― `Principles of social reconstruction' by BERTRAND RUSSELL

        2 "Science can, if it chooses, enable our grandchildren to live the good life, by giving them knowledge, self-control and characters productive of harmony rather than strife…..Then at least we shall have won our freedom." ― `What I believe' by BERTRAND RUSSELL

        3"Saint Augustine – one of the four great fathers of the Latin Church. None can deny the greatness of Augustine's soul – his enthusiasm, his unceasing search after truth, his affectionate disposition, his ardour, his self-devotion. No single name has ever exercised such power over the Christian Church, and no mind ever made so deep an impression upon Christian thought. He was more profound than Ambrose, his spiritual father. In him scholastics and mysteries popes and the opponents of the papal supremacy, have seen their champion. He was the function on which Luther rested the thoughts by which he sought to lift the past of the Church out of the rut"

        4 "It is not the exceptional individual in this world who is to enjoy this supreme vision by means of some process of self-discipline or self-abnegation: it is rather the soul-principle in every individual that at all times possesses the universal knowledge, as that of a queen in her realm, and that makes the mind and the senses in their respective lower planes to acquire a knowledge of both the macrocosm and the microcosm — of the universe at large and of the smaller but equally perfect universe of its own body. This knowledge even includes many things that never come to the individual's conscious intelligence, but remain in the secret and sacred sanctuary of the subconscious, where only the universal control of a divine guardian is active…..the delights which the body and soul are capable of enjoying together are not genuine and true unless they have some further connection, and terminate in the veneration and love of God ; that is, unless they have reference to this love and ultimate end, in a connection with which the sense of delight most essentially consists……..Swedenborg's transition from the attitude of the rigidly mechanical physicist and the speculative philosopher to that of the illumined seer and the exponent of a philosophy no longer human only, but angelic constitutes an experience unique in the annals of human thought." - Swedenborg and the 'Sapientia angelica' by Frank Sewall


        [Ref: Nana Prasange Vol.1, Ninth Edition, Dec-2001, Page 44-47]

        [Note : The original transcript is in Bengali and is translated here by Subrata Ghosh. The words, highlighted in bold are, however, originally used by Shri Shri Thakur Anukulchandra ji Himself]


      • SUNDEEP MOHNOT
        Absolutely interesting fact. Knew a bit but thanks for the details. I think we should compile all these kind of facts which are unknown or ignored due to
        Message 3 of 6 , Feb 12, 2012
          Absolutely interesting fact. Knew a bit but thanks for the details.
          I think we should compile all these kind of facts which are unknown or ignored due to vested interests. Like the ZERO, Surgery, Arthshastra, Pneumonics, Value of PI, astrology, astronomy, medicine, equations, Manusmriti, etc. all by Indians which was done before the world even understood the meaning.
          PLEASE take initiative to spread this word to the world. We are not super power, WE WERE ALWAYS THE SUPER POWER. Rest came later.
          Sundeep K Mohnot
          +91-9324449631
          www.sundeepmohnot.com


          From: VIJAYANJI <vijayankiliyil@...>
          To: Aryakrishti-Vedic-Dharma@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Saturday, February 11, 2012 12:07 PM
          Subject: [Aryakrishti Vedic Dharma] The first air craft was made by an Indian

           
          Shri Shivkur Bapuji Talpade, the Indian who flew an unmanned aircraft, eight years before Wright.

          Orville Wright demonstrated on December 17th 1903 that it was possible for a ‘manned heavier than air machine to fly’. But, in 1895, eight years earlier, the Sanskrit scholar Shivkar Bapuji Talpade had designed a basic aircraft called Marutsakthi (meaning Power of Air) based on Vedic technology and had it take off unmanned before a large audience in the Chowpathy beach of Bombay. The importance of the Wright brothers lies in the fact, that it was a manned flight for a distance of 120 feet and Orville Wright became the first man to fly. But Talpade’s unmanned aircraft flew to a height of 1500 feet before crashing down and the historian Evan Koshtka, has described Talpade as the ‘first creator of an aircraft’.

          As the world observes the one hundredth anniversary of the first manned flight, it is interesting to consider the saga of India’s 19th century first aircraft inventor for his design was entirely based on the rich treasury of India’s Vedas. Shivkar Bapuji Talpade was born in 1864 in the locality of Chirabazar at Dukkarwadi in Bombay.

          He was a scholar of Sanskrit and from his young age was attracted by the Vaimanika Sastra (Aeronautical Science) expounded by the great Indian sage Maharishi Bhardwaja. One western scholar of Indology Stephen-Knapp has put in simple words or rather has tried to explain what Talpade did and succeeded!

          According to Knapp, the Vaimanika Shastra describes in detail, the construction of what is called, the mercury vortex engine the forerunner of the ion engines being made today by NASA. Knapp adds that additional information on the mercury engines can be found in the ancient Vedic text called Samaranga Sutradhara. This text also devotes 230 verses, to the use of these machines in peace and war. The Indologist William Clarendon, who has written down a detailed description of the mercury vortex engine in his translation of Samaranga Sutradhara quotes thus ‘Inside the circular air frame, place the mercury-engine with its solar mercury boiler at the aircraft center. By means of the power latent in the heated mercury which sets the driving whirlwind in motion a man sitting inside may travel a great distance in a most marvellous manner. Four strong mercury containers must be built into the interior structure. When these have been heated by fire through solar or other sources the vimana (aircraft) develops thunder-power through the mercury.

          NASA (National Aeronau-tical and Space Administra-tion) world’s richest/ most powerful scientific organisation is trying to create an ion engine that is a device that uses a stream of high velocity electrified particles instead of a blast of hot gases like in present day modern jet engines. Surprisingly according to the bi-monthly Ancient Skies published in USA, the aircraft engines being developed for future use by NASA by some strange coincidence also uses mercury bombardment units powered by Solar cells! Interestingly, the impulse is generated in seven stages. The mercury propellant is first vapourised fed into the thruster discharge chamber ionised converted into plasma by a combination with electrons broke down electrically and then accelerated through small openings in a screen to pass out of the engine at velocities between 1200 to 3000 kilometres per minute! But so far NASA has been able to produce an experimental basis only a one pound of thrust by its scientists a power derivation virtually useless. But 108 years ago Talpade was able to use his knowledge of Vaimanika Shastra to produce sufficient thrust to lift his aircraft 1500 feet into the air!

          According to Indian scholar Acharya, ‘Vaimanika Shastra deals about aeronautics including the design of aircraft the way they can be used for transportation and other applications in detail. The knowledge of aeronautics is described in Sanskrit in 100 sections, eight chapters, 500 principles and 3000 slokas including 32 techniques to fly an aircraft. In fact, depending on the classifications of eras or Yugas in modern Kaliyuga aircraft used are called Krithakavimana flown by the power of engines by absorbing solar energies!’ It is feared that only portions of Bharadwaja’s masterpiece Vaimanika Shas-tra survive today.

          The question that comes to one’s mind is, what happened to this wonderful encyclopaedia of aeronautical knowledge accumulated by the Indian savants of yore, and why was it not used? But in those days, such knowledge was the preserve of sages, who would not allow it to be misused, just like the knowledge of atomic bombs is being used by terrorists today!

          According to scholar Ratnakar Mahajan who wrote a brochure on Talpade. ‘Being a Sanskrit scholar interested in aeronautics, Talpade studied and consulted a number of Vedic treatises like Brihad Vaimanika Shastra of Maharishi Bharadwaja Vimanachandrika of Acharya Narayan Muni Viman yantra of Maharish Shownik Yantra Kalp by Maharishi Garg Muni Viman Bindu of Acharya Vachaspati and Vimana Gyanarka Prakashika of Maharishi Dhundiraj’. This gave him confidence that he can build an aircraft with mercury engines. One essential factor in the creation of these Vedic aircraft was the timing of the Suns Rays or Solar energy (as being now utilised by NASA) when they were most effective to activate the mercury ions of the engine. Happily for Talpade Maharaja Sayaji Rao Gaekwad of Baroda a great supporter of the Sciences in India, was willing to help him and Talpade went ahead with his aircraft construction with mercury engines. One day in 1895 (unfortunately the actual date is not mentioned in the Kesari newspaper of Pune which covered the event) before an curious scholarly audience headed by the famous Indian judge/ nationalist/ Mahadeva Govin-da Ranade and H H Sayaji Rao Gaekwad Talpade had the good fortune to see his un manned aircraft named as ‘Marutsakthi’ take off, fly to a height of 1500 feet and then fall down to earth.

          But this success of an Indian scientist was not liked by the Imperial rulers. Warned by the British Government the Maharaja of Baroda stopped helping Talpade. It is said that the remains of the Marutsakthi were sold to ‘foreign parties’ by the relatives of Talpade in order to salvage whatever they can out of their loans to him. Talpade’s wife died at this critical juncture and he was not in a mental frame to continue with his researches. But his efforts to make known the greatness of Vedic Shastras was recognised by Indian scholars, who gave him the title of Vidya Prakash Pra-deep.

          Talpade passed away in 1916 un-honoured, in his own country.

          As the world rightly honours the Wright Brothers for their achievements, we should think of Talpade, who utilised the ancient knowledge of Sanskrit texts, to fly an aircraft, eight years before his foreign counterparts.
          Copyright,1999 The Printers (Mysore) Private Ltd.

          --- On Sat, 11/2/12, vagabondindia <vagabondindia@...> wrote:

          From: vagabondindia <vagabondindia@...>
          Subject: [Aryakrishti Vedic Dharma] 'Saadhak' & Scientist
          To: Aryakrishti-Vedic-Dharma@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Saturday, 11 February, 2012, 11:59 AM

           
          Question: There is a big laboratory in Presidency college, but their research is not increasing our national wealth in any way – why is it so?
          Shri Shri Thakur: That is because one cannot be committed to a fulltime employment and simultaneously doing (real) research work.1 The research which is inspired from the thought of addressing the need of the country, caring  for the welfare of the fellow countrymen by ensuring continued improvement upon their health, education, wealth and peace, is the real research and this is what is endorsed by the `Arya-dharma' as well. The scientists of other developed nations verily do this and so without beating the drums of dharma they happen to be the real dhaarmik.
          Question: People say there is no connection between science and dharma – rather they are like the opposite poles. Science increases worldly comfort whereas dharma brings in renunciation.
          Shri Shri Thakur: Science itself is the guide to the nectarine path of life. Science verily shows us how to lead a blissful life, how to live and grow unabatedly.2 That is why dharma itself invites science. Science is the vision of spirituality. In the process of realising the soul, all that it beholds gradually become visible. The knowledge gained in this process is the real science, and also the real spirituality.

          Question: Well, are the realisations of a scientist and a saadhak (ascetic practitioner) similar? How were the ancient saadhaks and sages of our country? Were they essentially the same scientists as we know today?
          Shri Shri Thakur: The realisation of a scientist comes through observation, the realisation of a saadhak also comes through observation. However, a scientist goes about analysing matter, whereas a saadhak is always in search for the cause behind it. This results in a difference of perception between them.  A saadhak develops his perception through sensation, on the other hand, a scientist's perception comes through particular sense-organs – along with inference. If a scientist develops similar attitude then he can become a saadhak.
          Question: What is this attitude of a saadhak?
          Shri Shri Thakur: If a scientist becomes a  research-man and a saadhak, befitting the age, then all the visions which come in front of him, come through sensation. Now if there be the attitude to materialise these visions physically through apt research, then only there develops a harmony between observation through sensation and observation through analysis – through which the perfect sensation of things can be acquired.3 The attitude of a saadhak verily means that he wants to analyse his complexes to find out the root cause and since these complexes come out through our interactions with surroundings, that brings about his deep affinity towards the `cause'.4
          Foot notes:
          1 "Almost all paid work is done from desire, not from impulse: the work itself is more or less irksome, but the payment for it is desired. The serious activities that fill a man's working hours are, except in a few fortunate individuals, governed mainly by purposes, not by impulses towards those activities." ― `Principles of social reconstruction' by BERTRAND RUSSELL
          2 "Science can, if it chooses, enable our grandchildren to live the good life, by giving them knowledge, self-control and characters productive of harmony rather than strife…..Then at least we shall have won our freedom." ― `What I believe' by BERTRAND RUSSELL
          3"Saint Augustine – one of the four great fathers of the Latin Church. None can deny the greatness of Augustine's soul – his enthusiasm, his unceasing search after truth, his affectionate disposition, his ardour, his self-devotion. No single name has ever exercised such power over the Christian Church, and no mind ever made so deep an impression upon Christian thought. He was more profound than Ambrose, his spiritual father. In him scholastics and mysteries popes and the opponents of the papal supremacy, have seen their champion. He was the function on which Luther rested the thoughts by which he sought to lift the past of the Church out of the rut"
          4 "It is not the exceptional individual in this world who is to enjoy this supreme vision by means of some process of self-discipline or self-abnegation: it is rather the soul-principle in every individual that at all times possesses the universal knowledge, as that of a queen in her realm, and that makes the mind and the senses in their respective lower planes to acquire a knowledge of both the macrocosm and the microcosm — of the universe at large and of the smaller but equally perfect universe of its own body. This knowledge even includes many things that never come to the individual's conscious intelligence, but remain in the secret and sacred sanctuary of the subconscious, where only the universal control of a divine guardian is active…..the delights which the body and soul are capable of enjoying together are not genuine and true unless they have some further connection, and terminate in the veneration and love of God ; that is, unless they have reference to this love and ultimate end, in a connection with which the sense of delight most essentially consists……..Swedenborg's transition from the attitude of the rigidly mechanical physicist and the speculative philosopher to that of the illumined seer and the exponent of a philosophy no longer human only, but angelic constitutes an experience unique in the annals of human thought." - Swedenborg and the 'Sapientia angelica' by Frank Sewall

          [Ref: Nana Prasange Vol.1, Ninth Edition, Dec-2001, Page 44-47]

          [Note : The original transcript is in Bengali and is translated here by Subrata Ghosh. The words, highlighted in bold are, however, originally used by Shri Shri Thakur Anukulchandra ji Himself]



        • Yashendra
          The name of Shri Talpade s aircraft was `Marut- Sakha . It had not flown. It just went up in the air and came down. At Mumbai s famous Chowpatty ( Girgaum) on
          Message 4 of 6 , Feb 13, 2012

            The name of Shri Talpade's aircraft was `Marut- Sakha'. It had not flown. It just went up in the air and came down. At Mumbai's famous Chowpatty ( Girgaum) on Marine Drive.

            In 1996-97, I had made a telefilm on this subject for Zee TV.  That gave me an opportunity to research this entire issue. I also visited Talpade's house in Chirabazar, Mumbai. Its within walking distance from Metro Cinema. It was converted into a laundry then.

            Talpade was a professor at the JJ School of Architecture. Vijayan ji has given all essential details about what he did. ….. Talpade's aircraft's remains were sold to HAL ( Bangalore). I tried my best to locate where it went but failed to get any lead. However, I did find one person with immense information- Mr. Regret Iyer.

            The entire text of Maharshi Bharadwaj's `Vaimanik Shastra' has been available in the File Section of this forum since many years.  Some information was also posted under the heading:  

            Ancient Indian Aircraft Technology, on Mar 6, 2006. Message post No: 323
            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Aryakrishti-Vedic-Dharma/message/323

            While researching on Talpade, I came across Mr. Naren Seth in Mumbai. Kavita Paudwal ( singer Anuradha Paudwal's daughter) was the one who took me to his residence at Kemp's Corner.  He has been an explorer on Sage Bharadwaja's treatise.  He wanted to actually manufacture some part of the aircraft according to the technology available in this ancient treatise. For that he selected `Chumbak Mani', a kind of magnet which is one of the components prescribed for the Vimanas.  It required 4 materials as per the shlokas given.  He deciphered the meaning and prepared a scientific project on this.  With the help of the Institute of Science ( perhaps TIFR also), he succeeded in making it. It was sent to the IIT, Mumbai, for verification, and was duly certified by them as a new kind of magnet.

            I had  interviewed Mr. Naren Seth on camera, and the concerned scientists at the Institute of Science and the IIT as well.  Prof Om Prakash of IIT was actually baffled by the use such multi-component materials.

            Mr. Naren Seth had used his own meagure resources to finance this project, and was not supported by anyone. He was also ridiculed by most of the scientists as they questioned his "right to do research" as Mr. Seth had degree in agriculture ! He overcame all this to succeed in his project.

            This was a great achievement. …. Mr. Naren Seth became a good friend of mine. We tried to explore several avenues to raise money to further his research, but failed to get any response. …. ….  There was a lady ( with a unique surname, perhaps Parsi),who was first Indian women to do something ( I don't remember what !) in the field of aviation. She read about my film in a newspaper and called me at her Shivaji Park residence. She was based in the US. She promised me to arrange financial help, but that also did not materialize.

            Over the years,  we have been on the lookout for sponsor for this great scientific project but of no avail. 

            I also went to Kolkata to meet Dr. Dilip Kanjilal, the author of `Vimanas in Ancient India'.  He has helped the world renowned explorer Erich von Däniken who has wriiten the famous book ` Chariots of the Gods'.   Mr. Kanjilal told me that Talpade had written a 2 volume book on how hi manufactured his aircraft `Marut Sakha'. Its titled ` Viman Kalecha Shodh' ( in Marathi).  One Bengali family of Kolkata had given the 1st volume to Mr. Kanjilal. But the family had refused to show the 2nd volume due to some inexplicable reasons. 

            I took that family's address from Mr. Kanjilal and requested them a lot to see that book and get a Xerox. But, this family remained adamant and quite rude in refusing.  I suspect that this book holds crucial technology.

            When I visited "Mumbai Marathi Granth Sangrahalay" ( library), I found Talpade's books listed in the catalogue, but they were missing from the shelf.  The library could not trace them.

            `Aryakrishti Vedic Sadhna Vihar' is our Charitable Trust, and it's our serious wish to undertake a scientific research project on this subject. Lack of resources hasn't allowed us to do proceed further.
            In my individual capacity as a film maker, I look to make films on such subjects so that I get at least some funding. That helps to some extent.

            Yashendra

             





            --- In Aryakrishti-Vedic-Dharma@yahoogroups.com, VIJAYANJI <vijayankiliyil@...> wrote:
            >
            > Shri Shivkur Bapuji
            > Talpade, the Indian who flew an unmanned aircraft, eight years before Wright.
            >
            >
            >
            > Orville Wright demonstrated on December 17th
            > 1903 that it was possible for a ‘manned heavier than air machine to fly’. But,
            > in 1895, eight years earlier, the Sanskrit scholar Shivkar Bapuji Talpade had
            > designed a basic aircraft called Marutsakthi (meaning Power of Air) based on
            > Vedic technology and had it take off unmanned before a large audience in the
            > Chowpathy beach of Bombay. The importance of the Wright brothers lies in the
            > fact, that it was a manned flight for a distance of 120 feet and Orville Wright
            > became the first man to fly. But Talpade’s unmanned aircraft flew to a height
            > of 1500 feet before crashing down and the historian Evan Koshtka, has described
            > Talpade as the ‘first creator of an aircraft’.
            >
            >
            >
            > As the world observes the one hundredth
            > anniversary of the first manned flight, it is interesting to consider the saga
            > of India’s 19th century first aircraft inventor for his design was entirely
            > based on the rich treasury of India’s Vedas. Shivkar Bapuji Talpade was born in
            > 1864 in the locality of Chirabazar at Dukkarwadi in Bombay.
            >
            >
            >
            > He was a scholar of Sanskrit and from his
            > young age was attracted by the Vaimanika Sastra (Aeronautical Science)
            > expounded by the great Indian sage Maharishi Bhardwaja. One western scholar of
            > Indology Stephen-Knapp has put in simple words or rather has tried to explain
            > what Talpade did and succeeded!
            >
            >
            >
            > According to Knapp, the Vaimanika Shastra
            > describes in detail, the construction of what is called, the mercury vortex
            > engine the forerunner of the ion engines being made today by NASA. Knapp adds
            > that additional information on the mercury engines can be found in the ancient
            > Vedic text called Samaranga Sutradhara. This text also devotes 230 verses, to
            > the use of these machines in peace and war. The Indologist William Clarendon,
            > who has written down a detailed description of the mercury vortex engine in his
            > translation of Samaranga Sutradhara quotes thus ‘Inside the circular air frame,
            > place the mercury-engine with its solar mercury boiler at the aircraft center.
            > By means of the power latent in the heated mercury which sets the driving
            > whirlwind in motion a man sitting inside may travel a great distance in a most
            > marvellous manner. Four strong mercury containers must be built into the
            > interior structure. When these have been heated by fire through solar or other
            > sources the vimana (aircraft) develops thunder-power through the mercury.
            >
            >
            >
            > NASA (National Aeronau-tical and Space
            > Administra-tion) world’s richest/ most powerful scientific organisation is
            > trying to create an ion engine that is a device that uses a stream of high
            > velocity electrified particles instead of a blast of hot gases like in present
            > day modern jet engines. Surprisingly according to the bi-monthly Ancient Skies
            > published in USA, the aircraft engines being developed for future use by NASA
            > by some strange coincidence also uses mercury bombardment units powered by
            > Solar cells! Interestingly, the impulse is generated in seven stages. The
            > mercury propellant is first vapourised fed into the thruster discharge chamber
            > ionised converted into plasma by a combination with electrons broke down
            > electrically and then accelerated through small openings in a screen to pass
            > out of the engine at velocities between 1200 to 3000 kilometres per minute! But
            > so far NASA has been able to produce an experimental basis only a one pound of
            > thrust by its scientists a power derivation virtually useless. But 108 years
            > ago Talpade was able to use his knowledge of Vaimanika Shastra to produce
            > sufficient thrust to lift his aircraft 1500 feet into the air!
            >
            >
            >
            > According to Indian scholar Acharya,
            > ‘Vaimanika Shastra deals about aeronautics including the design of aircraft the
            > way they can be used for transportation and other applications in detail. The
            > knowledge of aeronautics is described in Sanskrit in 100 sections, eight
            > chapters, 500 principles and 3000 slokas including 32 techniques to fly an
            > aircraft. In fact, depending on the classifications of eras or Yugas in modern
            > Kaliyuga aircraft used are called Krithakavimana flown by the power of engines
            > by absorbing solar energies!’ It is feared that only portions of Bharadwaja’s
            > masterpiece Vaimanika Shas-tra survive today.
            >
            >
            >
            > The question that comes to one’s mind is, what
            > happened to this wonderful encyclopaedia of aeronautical knowledge accumulated
            > by the Indian savants of yore, and why was it not used? But in those days, such
            > knowledge was the preserve of sages, who would not allow it to be misused, just
            > like the knowledge of atomic bombs is being used by terrorists today!
            >
            >
            >
            > According to scholar Ratnakar Mahajan who
            > wrote a brochure on Talpade. ‘Being a Sanskrit scholar interested in
            > aeronautics, Talpade studied and consulted a number of Vedic treatises like
            > Brihad Vaimanika Shastra of Maharishi Bharadwaja Vimanachandrika of Acharya
            > Narayan Muni Viman yantra of Maharish Shownik Yantra Kalp by Maharishi Garg
            > Muni Viman Bindu of Acharya Vachaspati and Vimana Gyanarka Prakashika of
            > Maharishi Dhundiraj’. This gave him confidence that he can build an aircraft
            > with mercury engines. One essential factor in the creation of these Vedic
            > aircraft was the timing of the Suns Rays or Solar energy (as being now utilised
            > by NASA) when they were most effective to activate the mercury ions of the
            > engine. Happily for Talpade Maharaja Sayaji Rao Gaekwad of Baroda a great
            > supporter of the Sciences in India, was willing to help him and Talpade went
            > ahead with his aircraft construction with mercury engines. One day in 1895
            > (unfortunately the actual date is not mentioned in the Kesari newspaper of Pune
            > which covered the event) before an curious scholarly audience headed by the
            > famous Indian judge/ nationalist/ Mahadeva Govin-da Ranade and H H Sayaji Rao
            > Gaekwad Talpade had the good fortune to see his un manned aircraft named as
            > ‘Marutsakthi’ take off, fly to a height of 1500 feet and then fall down to
            > earth.
            >
            >
            >
            > But this success of an Indian scientist was
            > not liked by the Imperial rulers. Warned by the British Government the Maharaja
            > of Baroda stopped helping Talpade. It is said that the remains of the
            > Marutsakthi were sold to ‘foreign parties’ by the relatives of Talpade in order
            > to salvage whatever they can out of their loans to him. Talpade’s wife died at
            > this critical juncture and he was not in a mental frame to continue with his
            > researches. But his efforts to make known the greatness of Vedic Shastras was
            > recognised by Indian scholars, who gave him the title of Vidya Prakash
            > Pra-deep.
            >
            >
            >
            > Talpade passed away in 1916 un-honoured, in
            > his own country.
            >
            >
            >
            > As the world rightly honours the Wright
            > Brothers for their achievements, we should think of Talpade, who utilised the
            > ancient knowledge of Sanskrit texts, to fly an aircraft, eight years before his
            > foreign counterparts.
            >
            > Copyright,1999 The Printers (Mysore) Private
            > Ltd.
            > --- On Sat, 11/2/12, vagabondindia vagabondindia@... wrote:
            >
            > From: vagabondindia vagabondindia@...
            > Subject: [Aryakrishti Vedic Dharma] 'Saadhak' & Scientist
            > To: Aryakrishti-Vedic-Dharma@yahoogroups.com
            > Date: Saturday, 11 February, 2012, 11:59 AM
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >  
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Question: There
            > is a big laboratory in Presidency college, but their research is not
            > increasing our national wealth in any way â€" why is it so?Shri Shri Thakur: That is because one cannot be committed to a fulltime employment and simultaneously doing (real) research work.1
            > The research which is inspired from the thought of addressing the need
            > of the country, caring  for the welfare of the fellow countrymen by
            > ensuring continued improvement upon their health, education, wealth and
            > peace, is the real research and this is what is endorsed by the
            > `Arya-dharma' as well. The scientists of other developed nations verily
            > do this and so without beating the drums of dharma they happen to be the
            > real dhaarmik. Question: People
            > say there is no connection between science and dharma â€" rather they are
            > like the opposite poles. Science increases worldly comfort whereas
            > dharma brings in renunciation.Shri Shri Thakur: Science itself is the guide to the nectarine path of life. Science verily shows us how to lead a blissful life, how to live and grow unabatedly.2 That
            > is why dharma itself invites science. Science is the vision of
            > spirituality. In the process of realising the soul, all that it beholds
            > gradually become visible. The knowledge gained in this process is the
            > real science, and also the real spirituality.
            > Question: Well, are the realisations of a scientist and a saadhak (ascetic practitioner) similar? How were the ancient saadhaks and sages of our country? Were they essentially the same scientists as we know today?Shri Shri Thakur: The realisation of a scientist comes through observation, the realisation of a saadhak also comes through observation.
            > However, a scientist goes about analysing matter, whereas a saadhak is
            > always in search for the cause behind it. This results in a difference
            > of perception between them.  A saadhak develops his perception through sensation, on the other hand, a scientist's perception comes through particular sense-organs â€" along with inference. If a scientist develops similar attitude then he can become a saadhak.Question: What is this attitude of a saadhak?Shri Shri Thakur: If a scientist becomes a  research-man and a saadhak, befitting the age, then all the visions which come in front of him, come through sensation. Now if there be the attitude to materialise these visions physically through apt research, then only there develops a harmony between observation through sensation and observation through analysis â€" through which the perfect sensation of things can be acquired.3
            > The attitude of a saadhak verily means that he wants to analyse his
            > complexes to find out the root cause and since these complexes come out
            > through our interactions with surroundings, that brings about his deep
            > affinity towards the `cause'.4Foot notes:1 â€" "Almost
            > all paid work is done from desire, not from impulse: the work itself is
            > more or less irksome, but the payment for it is desired. The serious
            > activities that fill a man's working hours are, except in a few
            > fortunate individuals, governed mainly by purposes, not by impulses
            > towards those activities." ― `Principles of social reconstruction' by BERTRAND RUSSELL2 â€" "Science
            > can, if it chooses, enable our grandchildren to live the good life, by
            > giving them knowledge, self-control and characters productive of harmony
            > rather than strife…..Then at least we shall have won our freedom." ― `What I believe' by BERTRAND RUSSELL3â€" "Saint
            > Augustine â€" one of the four great fathers of the Latin Church. None can
            > deny the greatness of Augustine's soul â€" his enthusiasm, his unceasing
            > search after truth, his affectionate disposition, his ardour, his
            > self-devotion. No single name has ever exercised such power over the
            > Christian Church, and no mind ever made so deep an impression upon
            > Christian thought. He was more profound than Ambrose, his spiritual
            > father. In him scholastics and mysteries popes and the opponents of the
            > papal supremacy, have seen their champion. He was the function on which
            > Luther rested the thoughts by which he sought to lift the past of the
            > Church out of the rut"4 â€" "It
            > is not the exceptional individual in this world who is to enjoy this
            > supreme vision by means of some process of self-discipline or
            > self-abnegation: it is rather the soul-principle in every individual
            > that at all times possesses the universal knowledge, as that of a queen
            > in her realm, and that makes the mind and the senses in their respective
            > lower planes to acquire a knowledge of both the macrocosm and the
            > microcosm â€" of the universe at large and of the smaller but equally
            > perfect universe of its own body. This knowledge even includes many
            > things that never come to the individual's conscious intelligence, but
            > remain in the secret and sacred sanctuary of the subconscious, where
            > only the universal control of a divine guardian is active…..the delights
            > which the body and soul are capable of enjoying together are not
            > genuine and true unless they have some further connection, and terminate
            > in the veneration and love of God ; that is, unless they have reference
            > to this love and ultimate end, in a connection with which the sense of
            > delight most essentially consists……..Swedenborg's transition from the
            > attitude of the rigidly mechanical physicist and the speculative
            > philosopher to that of the illumined seer and the exponent of a
            > philosophy no longer human only, but angelic constitutes an experience
            > unique in the annals of human thought." - Swedenborg and the 'Sapientia angelica' by Frank Sewall
            > [Ref: Nana Prasange Vol.1, Ninth Edition, Dec-2001, Page 44-47]
            >
            > [Note
            > : The original transcript is in Bengali and is translated here by
            > Subrata Ghosh. The words, highlighted in bold are, however, originally
            > used by Shri Shri Thakur Anukulchandra ji Himself]
            >
          • Sapna D
            Thanks for sharing this wounderful document... ... From: Yashendra Subject: [Aryakrishti Vedic Dharma] Re: The first air craft was
            Message 5 of 6 , Feb 13, 2012
              Thanks for sharing this wounderful document...

              --- On Mon, 13/2/12, Yashendra <yashendra108@...> wrote:

              From: Yashendra <yashendra108@...>
              Subject: [Aryakrishti Vedic Dharma] Re: The first air craft was made by an Indian
              To: Aryakrishti-Vedic-Dharma@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Monday, 13 February, 2012, 17:26

               


              The name of Shri Talpade's aircraft was `Marut- Sakha'. It had not flown. It just went up in the air and came down. At Mumbai's famous Chowpatty ( Girgaum) on Marine Drive.

              In 1996-97, I had made a telefilm on this subject for Zee TV.  That gave me an opportunity to research this entire issue. I also visited Talpade's house in Chirabazar, Mumbai. Its within walking distance from Metro Cinema. It was converted into a laundry then.

              Talpade was a professor at the JJ School of Architecture. Vijayan ji has given all essential details about what he did. ….. Talpade's aircraft's remains were sold to HAL ( Bangalore). I tried my best to locate where it went but failed to get any lead. However, I did find one person with immense information- Mr. Regret Iyer.

              The entire text of Maharshi Bharadwaj's `Vaimanik Shastra' has been available in the File Section of this forum since many years.  Some information was also posted under the heading:  

              Ancient Indian Aircraft Technology, on Mar 6, 2006. Message post No: 323
              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Aryakrishti-Vedic-Dharma/message/323

              While researching on Talpade, I came across Mr. Naren Seth in Mumbai. Kavita Paudwal ( singer Anuradha Paudwal's daughter) was the one who took me to his residence at Kemp's Corner.  He has been an explorer on Sage Bharadwaja's treatise.  He wanted to actually manufacture some part of the aircraft according to the technology available in this ancient treatise. For that he selected `Chumbak Mani', a kind of magnet which is one of the components prescribed for the Vimanas.  It required 4 materials as per the shlokas given.  He deciphered the meaning and prepared a scientific project on this.  With the help of the Institute of Science ( perhaps TIFR also), he succeeded in making it. It was sent to the IIT, Mumbai, for verification, and was duly certified by them as a new kind of magnet.

              I had not interviewed Mr. Naren Seth on camera, and the concerned scientists at the Institute of Science and the IIT.  Prof Om Prakash of IIT was actually baffled by the use such multi-component materials.

              Mr. Naren Seth had used his own meagure resources to finance this project, and was not supported by anyone. He was also ridiculed by most of the scientists as they questioned his "right to do research" as Mr. Seth had degree in agriculture ! He overcame all this to succeed in his project.

              This was a great achievement. …. Mr. Naren Seth became a good friend of mine. We tried to explore several avenues to raise money to further his research, but failed to get any response. …. ….  There was a lady ( with a unique surname, perhaps Parsi),who was first Indian women to do something ( I don't remember what !) in the field of aviation. She read about my film in a newspaper and called me at her Shivaji Park residence. She was based in the US. She promised me to arrange financial help, but that also did not materialize.

               

              Over the years,  we have been on the lookout for sponsor for this great scientific project but of no avail. 

              I also went to Kolkata to meet Dr. Dilip Kanjilal, the author of `Vimanas in Ancient India'.  He has helped the world renowned explorer Erich von Däniken who has wriiten the famous book ` Chariots of the Gods'.   Mr. Kanjilal told me that Talpade had written a 2 volume book on how hi manufactured his aircraft `Marut Sakha'. Its titled ` Viman Kalecha Shodh' ( in Marathi).  One Bengali family of Kolkata had given the 1st volume to Mr. Kanjilal. But the family had refused to show the 2nd volume due to some inexplicable reasons. 

              I took that family's address from Mr. Kanjilal and requested them a lot to see that book and get a Xerox. But, this family remained adamant and quite rude in refusing.  I suspect that this book holds crucial technology.

              When I visited "Mumbai Marathi Granth Sangrahalay" ( library), I found Talpade's books listed in the catalogue, but they were missing from the shelf.  The library could not trace them.

              `Aryakrishti Vedic Sadhna Vihar' is our Charitable Trust, and it's our serious wish to undertake a scientific research project on this subject. Lack of resources hasn't allowed us to do proceed further.

              In my individual capacity as a film maker, I look to make films on such subjects so that I get at least some funding. That helps to some extent.

              Yashendra

               

              --- In Aryakrishti-Vedic-Dharma@yahoogroups.com, VIJAYANJI <vijayankiliyil@...> wrote:
              >
              > Shri Shivkur Bapuji
              > Talpade, the Indian who flew an unmanned aircraft, eight years before Wright.
              >
              >
              >
              > Orville Wright demonstrated on December 17th
              > 1903 that it was possible for a ‘manned heavier than air machine to fly’. But,
              > in 1895, eight years earlier, the Sanskrit scholar Shivkar Bapuji Talpade had
              > designed a basic aircraft called Marutsakthi (meaning Power of Air) based on
              > Vedic technology and had it take off unmanned before a large audience in the
              > Chowpathy beach of Bombay. The importance of the Wright brothers lies in the
              > fact, that it was a manned flight for a distance of 120 feet and Orville Wright
              > became the first man to fly. But Talpade’s unmanned aircraft flew to a height
              > of 1500 feet before crashing down and the historian Evan Koshtka, has described
              > Talpade as the ‘first creator of an aircraft’.
              >
              >
              >
              > As the world observes the one hundredth
              > anniversary of the first manned flight, it is interesting to consider the saga
              > of India’s 19th century first aircraft inventor for his design was entirely
              > based on the rich treasury of India’s Vedas. Shivkar Bapuji Talpade was born in
              > 1864 in the locality of Chirabazar at Dukkarwadi in
            • DR Vidyardhi NANDURI
              SUB:ARC PROPULSION SYSTEMPlasma Arc Propulsion helps automatically - Mercury Arc Propulsion. This can be easily be attempted if some one is serious. BOOKS BY
              Message 6 of 6 , Feb 14, 2012
                SUB:ARC PROPULSION SYSTEM
                Plasma Arc Propulsion helps automatically - Mercury Arc Propulsion. This can be easily be attempted if some one is serious.
                BOOKS BY VIDYARDHI NANDURI [1993-2011]  http://vidyardhicosmology.blogspot.com/ 

                To: Aryakrishti-Vedic-Dharma@yahoogroups.com
                From: vijayankiliyil@...
                Date: Fri, 10 Feb 2012 22:37:07 -0800
                Subject: [Aryakrishti Vedic Dharma] The first air craft was made by an Indian

                 

                Shri Shivkur Bapuji Talpade, the Indian who flew an unmanned aircraft, eight years before Wright.

                Orville Wright demonstrated on December 17th 1903 that it was possible for a ‘manned heavier than air machine to fly’. But, in 1895, eight years earlier, the Sanskrit scholar Shivkar Bapuji Talpade had designed a basic aircraft called Marutsakthi (meaning Power of Air) based on Vedic technology and had it take off unmanned before a large audience in the Chowpathy beach of Bombay. The importance of the Wright brothers lies in the fact, that it was a manned flight for a distance of 120 feet and Orville Wright became the first man to fly. But Talpade’s unmanned aircraft flew to a height of 1500 feet before crashing down and the historian Evan Koshtka, has described Talpade as the ‘first creator of an aircraft’.

                As the world observes the one hundredth anniversary of the first manned flight, it is interesting to consider the saga of India’s 19th century first aircraft inventor for his design was entirely based on the rich treasury of India’s Vedas. Shivkar Bapuji Talpade was born in 1864 in the locality of Chirabazar at Dukkarwadi in Bombay.

                He was a scholar of Sanskrit and from his young age was attracted by the Vaimanika Sastra (Aeronautical Science) expounded by the great Indian sage Maharishi Bhardwaja. One western scholar of Indology Stephen-Knapp has put in simple words or rather has tried to explain what Talpade did and succeeded!

                According to Knapp, the Vaimanika Shastra describes in detail, the construction of what is called, the mercury vortex engine the forerunner of the ion engines being made today by NASA. Knapp adds that additional information on the mercury engines can be found in the ancient Vedic text called Samaranga Sutradhara. This text also devotes 230 verses, to the use of these machines in peace and war. The Indologist William Clarendon, who has written down a detailed description of the mercury vortex engine in his translation of Samaranga Sutradhara quotes thus ‘Inside the circular air frame, place the mercury-engine with its solar mercury boiler at the aircraft center. By means of the power latent in the heated mercury which sets the driving whirlwind in motion a man sitting inside may travel a great distance in a most marvellous manner. Four strong mercury containers must be built into the interior structure. When these have been heated by fire through solar or other sources the vimana (aircraft) develops thunder-power through the mercury.

                NASA (National Aeronau-tical and Space Administra-tion) world’s richest/ most powerful scientific organisation is trying to create an ion engine that is a device that uses a stream of high velocity electrified particles instead of a blast of hot gases like in present day modern jet engines. Surprisingly according to the bi-monthly Ancient Skies published in USA, the aircraft engines being developed for future use by NASA by some strange coincidence also uses mercury bombardment units powered by Solar cells! Interestingly, the impulse is generated in seven stages. The mercury propellant is first vapourised fed into the thruster discharge chamber ionised converted into plasma by a combination with electrons broke down electrically and then accelerated through small openings in a screen to pass out of the engine at velocities between 1200 to 3000 kilometres per minute! But so far NASA has been able to produce an experimental basis only a one pound of thrust by its scientists a power derivation virtually useless. But 108 years ago Talpade was able to use his knowledge of Vaimanika Shastra to produce sufficient thrust to lift his aircraft 1500 feet into the air!

                According to Indian scholar Acharya, ‘Vaimanika Shastra deals about aeronautics including the design of aircraft the way they can be used for transportation and other applications in detail. The knowledge of aeronautics is described in Sanskrit in 100 sections, eight chapters, 500 principles and 3000 slokas including 32 techniques to fly an aircraft. In fact, depending on the classifications of eras or Yugas in modern Kaliyuga aircraft used are called Krithakavimana flown by the power of engines by absorbing solar energies!’ It is feared that only portions of Bharadwaja’s masterpiece Vaimanika Shas-tra survive today.

                The question that comes to one’s mind is, what happened to this wonderful encyclopaedia of aeronautical knowledge accumulated by the Indian savants of yore, and why was it not used? But in those days, such knowledge was the preserve of sages, who would not allow it to be misused, just like the knowledge of atomic bombs is being used by terrorists today!

                According to scholar Ratnakar Mahajan who wrote a brochure on Talpade. ‘Being a Sanskrit scholar interested in aeronautics, Talpade studied and consulted a number of Vedic treatises like Brihad Vaimanika Shastra of Maharishi Bharadwaja Vimanachandrika of Acharya Narayan Muni Viman yantra of Maharish Shownik Yantra Kalp by Maharishi Garg Muni Viman Bindu of Acharya Vachaspati and Vimana Gyanarka Prakashika of Maharishi Dhundiraj’. This gave him confidence that he can build an aircraft with mercury engines. One essential factor in the creation of these Vedic aircraft was the timing of the Suns Rays or Solar energy (as being now utilised by NASA) when they were most effective to activate the mercury ions of the engine. Happily for Talpade Maharaja Sayaji Rao Gaekwad of Baroda a great supporter of the Sciences in India, was willing to help him and Talpade went ahead with his aircraft construction with mercury engines. One day in 1895 (unfortunately the actual date is not mentioned in the Kesari newspaper of Pune which covered the event) before an curious scholarly audience headed by the famous Indian judge/ nationalist/ Mahadeva Govin-da Ranade and H H Sayaji Rao Gaekwad Talpade had the good fortune to see his un manned aircraft named as ‘Marutsakthi’ take off, fly to a height of 1500 feet and then fall down to earth.

                But this success of an Indian scientist was not liked by the Imperial rulers. Warned by the British Government the Maharaja of Baroda stopped helping Talpade. It is said that the remains of the Marutsakthi were sold to ‘foreign parties’ by the relatives of Talpade in order to salvage whatever they can out of their loans to him. Talpade’s wife died at this critical juncture and he was not in a mental frame to continue with his researches. But his efforts to make known the greatness of Vedic Shastras was recognised by Indian scholars, who gave him the title of Vidya Prakash Pra-deep.

                Talpade passed away in 1916 un-honoured, in his own country.

                As the world rightly honours the Wright Brothers for their achievements, we should think of Talpade, who utilised the ancient knowledge of Sanskrit texts, to fly an aircraft, eight years before his foreign counterparts.
                Copyright,1999 The Printers (Mysore) Private Ltd.


                --- On Sat, 11/2/12, vagabondindia <vagabondindia@...> wrote:

                From: vagabondindia <vagabondindia@...>
                Subject: [Aryakrishti Vedic Dharma] 'Saadhak' & Scientist
                To: Aryakrishti-Vedic-Dharma@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Saturday, 11 February, 2012, 11:59 AM

                 

                Question: There is a big laboratory in Presidency college, but their research is not increasing our national wealth in any way – why is it so?

                Shri Shri Thakur: That is because one cannot be committed to a fulltime employment and simultaneously doing (real) research work.1 The research which is inspired from the thought of addressing the need of the country, caring  for the welfare of the fellow countrymen by ensuring continued improvement upon their health, education, wealth and peace, is the real research and this is what is endorsed by the `Arya-dharma' as well. The scientists of other developed nations verily do this and so without beating the drums of dharma they happen to be the real dhaarmik.

                Question: People say there is no connection between science and dharma – rather they are like the opposite poles. Science increases worldly comfort whereas dharma brings in renunciation.

                Shri Shri Thakur: Science itself is the guide to the nectarine path of life. Science verily shows us how to lead a blissful life, how to live and grow unabatedly.2 That is why dharma itself invites science. Science is the vision of spirituality. In the process of realising the soul, all that it beholds gradually become visible. The knowledge gained in this process is the real science, and also the real spirituality.


                Question: Well, are the realisations of a scientist and a saadhak (ascetic practitioner) similar? How were the ancient saadhaks and sages of our country? Were they essentially the same scientists as we know today?

                Shri Shri Thakur: The realisation of a scientist comes through observation, the realisation of a saadhak also comes through observation. However, a scientist goes about analysing matter, whereas a saadhak is always in search for the cause behind it. This results in a difference of perception between them.  A saadhak develops his perception through sensation, on the other hand, a scientist's perception comes through particular sense-organs – along with inference. If a scientist develops similar attitude then he can become a saadhak.

                Question: What is this attitude of a saadhak?

                Shri Shri Thakur: If a scientist becomes a  research-man and a saadhak, befitting the age, then all the visions which come in front of him, come through sensation. Now if there be the attitude to materialise these visions physically through apt research, then only there develops a harmony between observation through sensation and observation through analysis – through which the perfect sensation of things can be acquired.3 The attitude of a saadhak verily means that he wants to analyse his complexes to find out the root cause and since these complexes come out through our interactions with surroundings, that brings about his deep affinity towards the `cause'.4

                Foot notes:

                1 "Almost all paid work is done from desire, not from impulse: the work itself is more or less irksome, but the payment for it is desired. The serious activities that fill a man's working hours are, except in a few fortunate individuals, governed mainly by purposes, not by impulses towards those activities." ― `Principles of social reconstruction' by BERTRAND RUSSELL

                2 "Science can, if it chooses, enable our grandchildren to live the good life, by giving them knowledge, self-control and characters productive of harmony rather than strife…..Then at least we shall have won our freedom." ― `What I believe' by BERTRAND RUSSELL

                3"Saint Augustine – one of the four great fathers of the Latin Church. None can deny the greatness of Augustine's soul – his enthusiasm, his unceasing search after truth, his affectionate disposition, his ardour, his self-devotion. No single name has ever exercised such power over the Christian Church, and no mind ever made so deep an impression upon Christian thought. He was more profound than Ambrose, his spiritual father. In him scholastics and mysteries popes and the opponents of the papal supremacy, have seen their champion. He was the function on which Luther rested the thoughts by which he sought to lift the past of the Church out of the rut"

                4 "It is not the exceptional individual in this world who is to enjoy this supreme vision by means of some process of self-discipline or self-abnegation: it is rather the soul-principle in every individual that at all times possesses the universal knowledge, as that of a queen in her realm, and that makes the mind and the senses in their respective lower planes to acquire a knowledge of both the macrocosm and the microcosm — of the universe at large and of the smaller but equally perfect universe of its own body. This knowledge even includes many things that never come to the individual's conscious intelligence, but remain in the secret and sacred sanctuary of the subconscious, where only the universal control of a divine guardian is active…..the delights which the body and soul are capable of enjoying together are not genuine and true unless they have some further connection, and terminate in the veneration and love of God ; that is, unless they have reference to this love and ultimate end, in a connection with which the sense of delight most essentially consists……..Swedenborg's transition from the attitude of the rigidly mechanical physicist and the speculative philosopher to that of the illumined seer and the exponent of a philosophy no longer human only, but angelic constitutes an experience unique in the annals of human thought." - Swedenborg and the 'Sapientia angelica' by Frank Sewall


                [Ref: Nana Prasange Vol.1, Ninth Edition, Dec-2001, Page 44-47]

                [Note : The original transcript is in Bengali and is translated here by Subrata Ghosh. The words, highlighted in bold are, however, originally used by Shri Shri Thakur Anukulchandra ji Himself]


              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.