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Re: [Apicius] Pear patina

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  • Correus
    I kindda figured.... What REALLY sucks is knowing it s all out there and I can t get it.  Just think of all the wonderfulfoodstufs we could have if it weren t
    Message 1 of 18 , May 29, 2013
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      I kindda figured....

      What REALLY sucks is knowing it's all out there and I can't get it.  Just think of all the wonderfulfoodstufs we could have if it weren't for some of our food import laws.

      Correus




      ________________________________
      From: "lilinah@..." <lilinah@...>
      To: Apicius@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Wednesday, May 29, 2013 5:04 PM
      Subject: Re: [Apicius] Pear patina



       
      First, sorry about that errant post, i hit some key on my keyboard and it sent an unedited message i was going to reply to.

      What i meant to send:

      I wrote:
      > I grew up in the American Midwest and when i moved to California i was
      > astonished at the enormous variety of fruits and vegetables available -
      > as a kid i'd only seen one or two types of plums and two or three types
      > of pears and one or two kinds of lettuce.

      Correus replied:
      > Welcome to my world.........

      Yeah, that's why i wrote that. I understand it can be difficult to find more than a limited variety of many things in some places, or nothing at all.

      Anahita



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Lucia Clark
      Well, it seems that Bosc and Anjou are best for cooking. Just google best pears for cooking In my orchard in Umbria when I was a child, we had a Bosc pear
      Message 2 of 18 , May 29, 2013
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        Well, it seems that Bosc and Anjou are best for cooking. Just google "best
        pears for cooking" In my orchard in Umbria when I was a child, we had a
        Bosc pear tree, and we only ate the pears baked. In a wood burning
        oven...but now I am bragging, sorry

        Those are the kind that will hold their firm flesh best

        Avete

        Lucia







        _____

        From: Apicius@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Apicius@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
        lilinah@...
        Sent: Wednesday, May 29, 2013 5:39 PM
        To: Apicius@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [Apicius] Pear patina





        Ross wrote:
        > @ LuciaClark
        >
        > My wife was heading toward the flagship Eataly store and she was asking me
        "What
        > kind of pears should I get?" And I said, any decent looking ordinary
        looking
        > pears. And she got some good looking ordinary looking pears. So I am
        afraid I
        > don't know what the exact variety is. :-( They looked like pears. :-(

        Pears don't look one way.

        Pears can have cool green skin, yellow-green with rosy-blush areas, yellow
        skin, rose pink skin, rough tan skin with a yellow-green undercolor. What
        color were yours? Here are two pages with photos of a few types:
        http://www.fruitsinfo.com/pears.htm
        and
        http://www.usapears.com/Recipes%20And%20Lifestyle/Now%20Serving/Pears%20and%
        20Varieties.aspx
        (this link will probably wrap - you can go to http://www.usapears.com/ ,
        select "Recipes and Lifestyle" from drop down menu, then under "Now Serving"
        select "Pear Varieties")

        Pears can have a variety of shapes - while they are usually larger on the
        blossom end than on the stem end, some are longer, some rounder, some almost
        oval, some shaped like apples. Pears of one of my favorite varieties are
        almost flat circles, crisp, and sweet, and not good cooked.

        I grew up in the American Midwest and when i moved to California i was
        astonished at the enormous variety of fruits and vegetables available - as a
        kid i'd only seen one or two types of plums and two or three types of pears
        and one or two kinds of lettuce.

        Anahita





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Correus
        WHY would you leave a place like Umbria!?!?!?!    I knew you ere there as a child and have often wondered. Correus ________________________________ From:
        Message 3 of 18 , May 29, 2013
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          WHY would you leave a place like Umbria!?!?!?!    I knew you ere there as a child and have often wondered.

          Correus




          ________________________________
          From: Lucia Clark <luciaclark@...>
          To: Apicius@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Wednesday, May 29, 2013 6:12 PM
          Subject: RE: [Apicius] Pear patina



           
          Well, it seems that Bosc and Anjou are best for cooking. Just google "best
          pears for cooking" In my orchard in Umbria when I was a child, we had a
          Bosc pear tree, and we only ate the pears baked. In a wood burning
          oven...but now I am bragging, sorry

          Those are the kind that will hold their firm flesh best

          Avete

          Lucia

          _____

          From: Apicius@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Apicius@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
          lilinah@...
          Sent: Wednesday, May 29, 2013 5:39 PM
          To: Apicius@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [Apicius] Pear patina

          Ross wrote:
          > @ LuciaClark
          >
          > My wife was heading toward the flagship Eataly store and she was asking me
          "What
          > kind of pears should I get?" And I said, any decent looking ordinary
          looking
          > pears. And she got some good looking ordinary looking pears. So I am
          afraid I
          > don't know what the exact variety is. :-( They looked like pears. :-(

          Pears don't look one way.

          Pears can have cool green skin, yellow-green with rosy-blush areas, yellow
          skin, rose pink skin, rough tan skin with a yellow-green undercolor. What
          color were yours? Here are two pages with photos of a few types:
          http://www.fruitsinfo.com/pears.htm
          and
          http://www.usapears.com/Recipes%20And%20Lifestyle/Now%20Serving/Pears%20and%
          20Varieties.aspx
          (this link will probably wrap - you can go to http://www.usapears.com/ ,
          select "Recipes and Lifestyle" from drop down menu, then under "Now Serving"
          select "Pear Varieties")

          Pears can have a variety of shapes - while they are usually larger on the
          blossom end than on the stem end, some are longer, some rounder, some almost
          oval, some shaped like apples. Pears of one of my favorite varieties are
          almost flat circles, crisp, and sweet, and not good cooked.

          I grew up in the American Midwest and when i moved to California i was
          astonished at the enormous variety of fruits and vegetables available - as a
          kid i'd only seen one or two types of plums and two or three types of pears
          and one or two kinds of lettuce.

          Anahita

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • anahita_al_shazhiyya
          ... I dunno bout that... I live in California and this state grows amazing stuff, some only available locally in season. And my local Berkeley Bowl (yeah, i
          Message 4 of 18 , May 29, 2013
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            Correus wrote:
            > What REALLY sucks is knowing it's all out there and I can't get it. Just think of
            > all the wonderfulfoodstufs we could have if it weren't for some of our food import
            > laws.

            I dunno 'bout that...

            I live in California and this state grows amazing stuff, some only available locally in season. And my local Berkeley Bowl (yeah, i live in Berkeley) has astonishing produce. Plus we have regular farmers' markets in a different neighborhood each day of the week. And we have so many different ethnic groups, i can get *almost* anything...

            As for food import laws, some actually protect our health (there's some "Mexican vanilla extract" that does not include vanilla...), some actually protect our agriculture from devastating invasive pests (and as a Californian, i REALLY do appreciate that), and, yeah, some just protect industries with clout.

            Maybe some day you could take a road trip with a cooler to California and pick up some stuff here and bring it home to experiment with - probably can't get a rolling bag full of fresh produce onto an airplane :-)

            There's a lot available via mail order. It's also possible that some of us in bigger cities could mail you some hard-to-find ingredients - although not fresh produce.

            Anahita
          • Correus
            Don t get me wrong...I do understand the need for some of the food laws - and agree with most of them - especially when it comes to agriculture. Some of the
            Message 5 of 18 , May 29, 2013
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              Don't get me wrong...I do understand the need for some of the food laws - and agree with most of them - especially when it comes to agriculture.

              Some of the laws I wish could be changed deal more with items like sausage, lardo, cheese etc that aren't allowed in.  Some things just taste better without all the additives and such.




              ________________________________
              From: "lilinah@..." <lilinah@...>
              To: Apicius@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Wednesday, May 29, 2013 7:44 PM
              Subject: Re: [Apicius] Pear patina



               
              Correus wrote:
              > What REALLY sucks is knowing it's all out there and I can't get it. Just think of
              > all the wonderfulfoodstufs we could have if it weren't for some of our food import
              > laws.

              I dunno 'bout that...

              I live in California and this state grows amazing stuff, some only available locally in season. And my local Berkeley Bowl (yeah, i live in Berkeley) has astonishing produce. Plus we have regular farmers' markets in a different neighborhood each day of the week. And we have so many different ethnic groups, i can get *almost* anything...

              As for food import laws, some actually protect our health (there's some "Mexican vanilla extract" that does not include vanilla...), some actually protect our agriculture from devastating invasive pests (and as a Californian, i REALLY do appreciate that), and, yeah, some just protect industries with clout.

              Maybe some day you could take a road trip with a cooler to California and pick up some stuff here and bring it home to experiment with - probably can't get a rolling bag full of fresh produce onto an airplane :-)

              There's a lot available via mail order. It's also possible that some of us in bigger cities could mail you some hard-to-find ingredients - although not fresh produce.

              Anahita



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Ross
              Wow... I knew about all of the different varieties of apples but had no idea of so many different kinds of pears. Ours would have been yellow-green with
              Message 6 of 18 , May 29, 2013
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                Wow... I knew about all of the different varieties of apples but had no idea of so many different kinds of pears.

                Ours would have been "yellow-green with rosy-blush areas". Actually they looked like this:

                http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/cf/Pears.jpg

                The caption underneath the picture said "European Pear" and this is what we're used to seeing in the New York area, hence my description.

                They were still rather firm when I poached them by the way (should have mentioned that earlier) with white or just off-white flesh.
              • anahita_al_shazhiyya
                ... We ve got a whole passel of folks around here who make their own cheeses - including aged cheeses - and make their own preserved meats - The Saluminati ;-P
                Message 7 of 18 , May 29, 2013
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                  Correus wrote:
                  > Don't get me wrong...I do understand the need for some of the food laws - and
                  > agree with most of them - especially when it comes to agriculture.
                  >
                  > Some of the laws I wish could be changed deal more with items like sausage, lardo,
                  > cheese etc that aren't allowed in. Some things just taste better without all the
                  > additives and such.

                  We've got a whole passel of folks around here who make their own cheeses - including aged cheeses - and make their own preserved meats - The Saluminati ;-P I think at least one friend is using a slightly altered dorm fridge as her cheese aging "cave". Most of them live in The City (that's San Francisco), so they're doing it in flats and apartments.

                  Ken Albala has a Facebook page for preserved foods, and i know there are some books out there (i could probably get you some titles). Maybe you could look into some of that.

                  Anahita
                • Lucia Clark
                  I ask myself the same question, often! It s just that life took me away. I lived around Rome and eventually in the city, but we always spent part of the
                  Message 8 of 18 , May 30, 2013
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                    I ask myself the same question, often! It's just that life took me away. I
                    lived around Rome and eventually in the city, but we always spent part of
                    the summer and fall in Umbria, my father's place of origin. I always go back
                    there when I visit Italy. Just to hear the talk and smell the smells (and
                    taste the food) it is good for my soul. I try to recreate what I can where I
                    live now, like planting red roses under my windows, keeping the laurel and
                    the fig trees and the herb garden, baking the bread the old fashion
                    way...anything that reminds me of that enchanted place

                    Ciao

                    Lucia



                    _____

                    From: Apicius@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Apicius@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
                    Correus
                    Sent: Wednesday, May 29, 2013 7:16 PM
                    To: Apicius@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: Re: [Apicius] Pear patina





                    WHY would you leave a place like Umbria!?!?!?! I knew you ere there as a
                    child and have often wondered.

                    Correus

                    ________________________________
                    From: Lucia Clark <luciaclark@...
                    <mailto:luciaclark%40luciadentice.com> >
                    To: Apicius@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Apicius%40yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Wednesday, May 29, 2013 6:12 PM
                    Subject: RE: [Apicius] Pear patina



                    Well, it seems that Bosc and Anjou are best for cooking. Just google "best
                    pears for cooking" In my orchard in Umbria when I was a child, we had a
                    Bosc pear tree, and we only ate the pears baked. In a wood burning
                    oven...but now I am bragging, sorry

                    Those are the kind that will hold their firm flesh best

                    Avete

                    Lucia

                    _____

                    From: Apicius@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Apicius%40yahoogroups.com>
                    [mailto:Apicius@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Apicius%40yahoogroups.com> ] On
                    Behalf Of
                    lilinah@... <mailto:lilinah%40earthlink.net>
                    Sent: Wednesday, May 29, 2013 5:39 PM
                    To: Apicius@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Apicius%40yahoogroups.com>
                    Subject: Re: [Apicius] Pear patina

                    Ross wrote:
                    > @ LuciaClark
                    >
                    > My wife was heading toward the flagship Eataly store and she was asking me
                    "What
                    > kind of pears should I get?" And I said, any decent looking ordinary
                    looking
                    > pears. And she got some good looking ordinary looking pears. So I am
                    afraid I
                    > don't know what the exact variety is. :-( They looked like pears. :-(

                    Pears don't look one way.

                    Pears can have cool green skin, yellow-green with rosy-blush areas, yellow
                    skin, rose pink skin, rough tan skin with a yellow-green undercolor. What
                    color were yours? Here are two pages with photos of a few types:
                    http://www.fruitsinfo.com/pears.htm
                    and
                    http://www.usapears.com/Recipes%20And%20Lifestyle/Now%20Serving/Pears%20and%
                    <http://www.usapears.com/Recipes%20And%20Lifestyle/Now%20Serving/Pears%20and
                    %25>
                    20Varieties.aspx
                    (this link will probably wrap - you can go to http://www.usapears.com/ ,
                    select "Recipes and Lifestyle" from drop down menu, then under "Now Serving"
                    select "Pear Varieties")

                    Pears can have a variety of shapes - while they are usually larger on the
                    blossom end than on the stem end, some are longer, some rounder, some almost
                    oval, some shaped like apples. Pears of one of my favorite varieties are
                    almost flat circles, crisp, and sweet, and not good cooked.

                    I grew up in the American Midwest and when i moved to California i was
                    astonished at the enormous variety of fruits and vegetables available - as a
                    kid i'd only seen one or two types of plums and two or three types of pears
                    and one or two kinds of lettuce.

                    Anahita

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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